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I am 14 and 165cm/5ft 5in. Would a 163/166cm tall ski be fine? [New Zealand]

post #1 of 61
Thread Starter 

As the title says. I HAVE read the FAQ about skis being from chin to nose. As being a teenager, I am obviously growing and am expected to be 170cm tall all grown up. Would http://www.snowride.co.nz/shop/Skis/Atomic+Skis/Atomic+D2+VF+75+neox+12+Binding+2013.html or http://www.rrsport.co.nz/product/2015-Volkl-Mens-Bridge-Ski?p=123329 be good? BTW I am a 7 on this guide http://www.snowride.co.nz/Buying+Guides/Ski+Buying+Guide.html

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 61
I think weight is also an issue here, better supply that as well. On first glance, the length would be fine. Might almost be a bit short due to the full rocker on the Volkl. But, the bigger question is, these seem to be totally different skis. Why are you naming these particular ones? Are you planning on getting both?
post #3 of 61
Thread Starter 

These were the 2 recommended to me by a friend who skis. I am more of a slalom person so I'm leaning towards the Atomics. My max budget is $1000 and that was the best skis for slalom stuff I could find. My weight is 55kg.

post #4 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZacDaMan72 View Post
 

As the title says. I HAVE read the FAQ about skis being from chin to nose. As being a teenager, I am obviously growing and am expected to be 170cm tall all grown up. Would http://www.snowride.co.nz/shop/Skis/Atomic+Skis/Atomic+D2+VF+75+neox+12+Binding+2013.html or http://www.rrsport.co.nz/product/2015-Volkl-Mens-Bridge-Ski?p=123329 be good? BTW I am a 7 on this guide http://www.snowride.co.nz/Buying+Guides/Ski+Buying+Guide.html

 

Thanks!

Welcome to EpicSki!  Good for you for finding the FAQ.  Where do you ski most often?  I'm guessing you are in New Zealand.  Correct?

post #5 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZacDaMan72 View Post
 

These were the 2 recommended to me by a friend who skis. I am more of a slalom person so I'm leaning towards the Atomics. My max budget is $1000 and that was the best skis for slalom stuff I could find. My weight is 55kg.

Be careful of advice from friends who ski.  They will tell you what they like and want.  Not what you need.  More questions to help you get the answers you seek:


1. You say you are more of a slalom person.  What do you mean by that?  Do you mean you race?  Or you like short turns on groomers?  

2. Will you be buying online?  Are you thinking of buying two pairs?

3. What type of runs do you usually do?  

4. What type of turns do you usually make?

5. How many days a year do you ski?  

6. Where do you ski?  

7. Are you interested more in groomer skiing, racing, off-piste skiing in the trees, bumps, terrain park?

 

Skis can be very specialized these days.  Here you'll get lots of good advice on which skis are for what.

post #6 of 61

You've been offered a sports car, and an SUV of sorts... very different creatures. What are your ski goals? Gates? Park? Free skiing? 

post #7 of 61
Thread Starter 

I do live in New Zealand :)

 

1. Slalom as in competition slalom. I am doing slalom for my school team. 

2. Yes. No

3. Blacks and a few blues (ones that have long downhill sections)

4. I'm getting more into carving but still mostly do parallel

5. Usually around 40 days if season starts in the second school holiday (not this year). If not around 32 days.

6. Turoa, New Zealand. http://www.mtruapehu.com/content/library/Turoa_Trail_Map_2013_v5.pdf

7. Groomer skiing and racing. We don't have any exciting off-piste places and no trees :/ I do so a bit of mogul.

 

My skiing goals are to get really smooth carving to improve my times in competitions.

These are the 3 places I am getting skis online, but where me and my family ski (Ohakune) there's 3 good ski shops so I might actually order skis after my first trip there (ski team training weekend in some weeks) after seeing what they have.

 

http://www.snowcentre.co.nz/Store/c/skis

http://www.rrsport.co.nz/category/Snow/Skis?c=15

http://www.snowride.co.nz/shop/Skis.html

post #8 of 61
Well, clearly the Atomics are closer to your needs, but I'm sure that someone will chime in with several other choices.
post #9 of 61
Originally Posted by ZacDaMan72 View Post
 

I do live in New Zealand :)

 

1. Slalom as in competition slalom. I am doing slalom for my school team. 

2. Yes. No

3. Blacks and a few blues (ones that have long downhill sections)

4. I'm getting more into carving but still mostly do parallel

5. Usually around 40 days if season starts in the second school holiday (not this year). If not around 32 days.

6. Turoa, New Zealand. http://www.mtruapehu.com/content/library/Turoa_Trail_Map_2013_v5.pdf

7. Groomer skiing and racing. We don't have any exciting off-piste places and no trees :/ I do so a bit of mogul.

 

My skiing goals are to get really smooth carving to improve my times in competitions.

These are the 3 places I am getting skis online, but where me and my family ski (Ohakune) there's 3 good ski shops so I might actually order skis after my first trip there (ski team training weekend in some weeks) after seeing what they have.

 

http://www.snowcentre.co.nz/Store/c/skis

http://www.rrsport.co.nz/category/Snow/Skis?c=15

http://www.snowride.co.nz/shop/Skis.html

 

 

Do you already own slalom race skis, in which case you are buying a second pair?  

Or are you going to use what you buy for free skiing as well as for racing?  If this is the case, which is more important to you, racing or free skiing?

post #10 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post


Do you already own slalom race skis, in which case you are buying a second pair?  
Or are you going to use what you buy for free skiing as well as for racing?  If this is the case, which is more important to you, racing or free skiing?

I don't already own skis my size, I usually just hired them after age 11. What's more important for me is a tough decision but I would go for free skiing, but like fast free skiing.
post #11 of 61

How much can you spend on these?

post #12 of 61

So we have a 14 year old who's interested in racing, enrolled in a racing program for several years, and does not yet own skis.  He rents slalom skis for the season.

He wants to know what skis to buy and how long they should be.  He doesn't yet know much about the different properties of skis that are built into their design.

His mountain has no exciting off-piste runs so he stays on the groomers. He skis bumps some.  He gets 32-40 days on snow during the season.

His goal is to learn to carve slalom sized turns better on piste, and to better his times in the gates.  He's focused on clean carving.

He's got $1,000 to spend.  He lives in New Zealand. 

 

 

 

@ZacDaMan72, at my mountain, which serves as home to some serious race training programs for people like you, the race kids ski around the mountain on their slalom race skis all of the time when free-skiing.  They learn to use those slalom boards on everything because that's what they are always on.  My guess is that if you want better slalom times, you buy slalom skis and ski them all the time.  Build your skills on those skis.  

 

Do you own your own boots yet?  If no, let's talk about spending some of that $$ on boots and buying used slalom race skis in your size.  If yes, let's find out how those boots fit.

 

I bet others will have suggestions for you.  This is summer, so there are not that many active folks reading.  Be patient.  You'll get good advice.

Calling all race coaches, @Jamt and everyone else, this guy needs advice. 


Edited by LiquidFeet - 6/29/14 at 3:59pm
post #13 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

So we have a 14 year old who's interested in racing, enrolled in a racing program for several years, and does not yet own skis.  He rents slalom skis for the season.
He wants to know what skis to buy and how long they should be.  He doesn't yet know much about the different properties of skis that are built into their design.
His mountain has no exciting off-piste runs so he stays on the groomers. He skis bumps some.  He gets 32-40 days on snow during the season.
His goal is to learn to carve slalom sized turns better on piste, and to better his times in the gates.  He's focused on clean carving.
He's got $1,000 to spend.  He lives in New Zealand. 



@ZacDaMan72
, at my mountain, which serves as home to some serious race training programs for people like you, the race kids ski around the mountain on their slalom race skis all of the time when free-skiing.  They learn to use those slalom boards on everything because that's what they are always on.  My guess is that if you want better slalom times, you buy slalom skis and ski them all the time.  Build your skills on those skis.  

Do you own your own boots yet?  If no, let's talk about spending some of that $$ on boots and buying used slalom race skis in your size.  If yes, let's find out how those boots fit.

I bet others will have suggestions for you.  This is summer, so there are not that many active folks reading.  Be patient.  You'll get good advice.
Calling all race coaches, @Jamt
 and everyone else, this guy needs advice. 

I do have all equipment excluding Skis. I have only been in the team since last year, when I started high school.
post #14 of 61

I you are serious about the racing part I wouldn't get anything but a real race ski. Nothing wider than 65, 65 or so. There are usually a lot of race skis on the second hand market. Often at a good price and in good shape since many racers are sponsored and get new skis every year. If you are strong you could go with a 165, then you have something that you can use for years. 

post #15 of 61
Thread Starter 

Not too serious about racing, probably will stop after high school because in New Zealand there is no real skiing presence as in competitions and stuff...

post #16 of 61
So why not talk to your club coaches for advice and possibly their knowledge of people with an appropriate pair of skis for you? You've got another 2-4 seasons of ski racing... Your situation is not at all unlike most jr. racers around the world... You do it until 18, then 'retire' unless you're chasing things at the national level. You're on piste. You're racing/race training. Why not a race ski?
post #17 of 61

@ZacDaMan72, have you read the following review?  Maybe you can take some information from it that helps you out.  

It talks about dampness and liveliness (damp=skis handle speed without wanting to throw you), then talks about some slalom skis that handle longer turns with ease (which you'll want).

It mentions lengths (165 for slalom turners, but maybe this is for bigger guys who might be reading the review).   

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/127733/more-mag-lev-lasers-fischer-superior-pro-and-rc4-firearrow-84-and-some-civilian-saloms 

post #18 of 61
The fire arrow 84 would kill him. He doesn't weigh enough to make it work. If it's a non race ski he's looking for, something like a head supershape magnum or speed might be the way to go.
post #19 of 61

mod hat on

I'm going to move this over to the gear forum, but leave a redirect from here up for a month. This may give Zac a little more feedback without interrupting the progress being made.

mod hat off

post #20 of 61
Have you considered buying from a north america shop that will ship to NZ? You can either get something similar for half the price or get a real top of the line ski with your budget.

The VF75 is discontinued here but was available for $350ish in stores.
post #21 of 61
$1000NZ = $875US
post #22 of 61
Thread Starter 

You have to consider shipping which is really expensive and slow from US to New Zealand, will be probably like $100 to ship it here within a month! I'll still have a look anyway..

post #23 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

So why not talk to your club coaches for advice and possibly their knowledge of people with an appropriate pair of skis for you? You've got another 2-4 seasons of ski racing... Your situation is not at all unlike most jr. racers around the world... You do it until 18, then 'retire' unless you're chasing things at the national level. You're on piste. You're racing/race training. Why not a race ski?

My club doesn't have coaches, the 2 guys who manage the club are snowboarders -_-.

post #24 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZacDaMan72 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

So why not talk to your club coaches for advice and possibly their knowledge of people with an appropriate pair of skis for you? You've got another 2-4 seasons of ski racing... Your situation is not at all unlike most jr. racers around the world... You do it until 18, then 'retire' unless you're chasing things at the national level. You're on piste. You're racing/race training. Why not a race ski?

My club doesn't have coaches, the 2 guys who manage the club are snowboarders -_-.

 

OK, that explains a lot.  You love skiing and the race program is a way to guarantee that you ski a lot.  

But it isn't a serious race program focused on winning competitions.  What does "manage the club" mean?  Do you get any real training on how to improve your carving inside or outside the gates?

Do you observe and discuss videos of yourself and your teammates?  Do you take training runs outside the gates?  Do you do drills?

And... how long have you been skiing?  Did you get coaching or instruction when you started, independent of this school race program?

 

I ask because how much you know about making turns will impact which ski will be the best choice for you.

post #25 of 61

My list of 2014 skis for you would include Head Worldcup Rebels i. SL RD in 160 cm, Fischer Worldcup RC4 SC Pro also in 160 (not Superior Pro, not Superior SC, nor any other varient) and Kastle RX SL (or RX 12 if you're more interested in having fun free skiing than winning SL races).

 

These may be out of your price range.  If you go to realskiers.com and pay for a membership you will find reviews and descriptions of previous years skis going back a long ways.  Basically pick skis with a radius of 13 m, traditional camber (i.e. no rocker- opinions vary on this), and sub 70mm waist, and at the closest to one level below FIS race level you can get (opting for FIS race if there isn't one as described above), make a list and look for a deal on used skis.

post #26 of 61
Have you considered joining you local club http://www.rsc.org.nz
This one has a racing program with interclub races.
Racing aside, the NZ club fields should be on every travelling skiers bucket list.
post #27 of 61

Honestly I think that you are best to demo skis in Ohakune before committing to purchase. Most shops will credit a couple of days demo hire towards a purchase. They will also be able to advise on the best skis suited to where you ski the most. I don't think that you are looking for a race ski though, or a predominantly off-piste ski (I suspect the north american analogy for this is more east side off-piste than western off piste conditions (i.e. not dry powder)) since you haven't explored that part of the mountain yet.

 

I take it that when you talk about a racing you are talking about the North Island Secondary School champs which is different to what others in the northern hemisphere might perceive a race programme - NISSC is a real mixed bag as this info from their website describes:

 

The competition is an annual team event hosted by Ruapehu College on the slopes of Mount Ruapehu. An invitation is extended to all interested secondary schools. The management reserves the right to limit entries to a manageable level although to date no team has been refused entry. The majority of entries are from North Island schools although some from the South Island have entered previously.

Any South Island entries compete evenly but do not qualify for the major trophies. The races for 2013 will again be held on the
Turoa Skifield.

The courses will be set for successful completion by intermediate skiers who may have had no previous experience with gates. In 2012 junior races were held on "Yahoo", senior races on "Branchline" and the freestyle section was in the terrain park all on Turoa Skifield.

Actual race sites on Turoa for 2013 are yet to be confirmed. A large range of skier ability is evident each year, ranging from apparent complete beginner to top New Zealand skiers.

It's a great fun event and I'm sure you will enjoy it, and the training day (which in the context of serious race programmes is more like a mountain orientation day). So, correct me if I'm wrong but you're not thinking of joining a race academy or anything like that.

post #28 of 61
When your ready to buy, do a google search for the ski you want. read the reviews, then hit the shopping button up top and get prices. When I bought my last pair of skis in March 2014, that's what I did. I got a new, in the wrapper, pair of 2 year old skis. I paid $250 shipped. The site I bought from had lots of leftover new race skis for cheap money.

You don't need the latest greatest gear out there for your racing.
post #29 of 61
Thread Starter 

So after a discussion with my dad, he is not letting me buy any skis till I'm 18 (AND I WAS GOING TO PURCHASE WITH MY OWN MONEY). He insists on getting season rentals which are $375 a year. I am 14 so $375*4=$1460 compared to $899 which should last me into the early 20s. Sorry for wasting your time and expertise people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Kiwi View Post
 

Honestly I think that you are best to demo skis in Ohakune before committing to purchase. Most shops will credit a couple of days demo hire towards a purchase. They will also be able to advise on the best skis suited to where you ski the most. I don't think that you are looking for a race ski though, or a predominantly off-piste ski (I suspect the north american analogy for this is more east side off-piste than western off piste conditions (i.e. not dry powder)) since you haven't explored that part of the mountain yet.

 

I take it that when you talk about a racing you are talking about the North Island Secondary School champs which is different to what others in the northern hemisphere might perceive a race programme - NISSC is a real mixed bag as this info from their website describes:

 

The competition is an annual team event hosted by Ruapehu College on the slopes of Mount Ruapehu. An invitation is extended to all interested secondary schools. The management reserves the right to limit entries to a manageable level although to date no team has been refused entry. The majority of entries are from North Island schools although some from the South Island have entered previously.

Any South Island entries compete evenly but do not qualify for the major trophies. The races for 2013 will again be held on the
Turoa Skifield.

The courses will be set for successful completion by intermediate skiers who may have had no previous experience with gates. In 2012 junior races were held on "Yahoo", senior races on "Branchline" and the freestyle section was in the terrain park all on Turoa Skifield.

Actual race sites on Turoa for 2013 are yet to be confirmed. A large range of skier ability is evident each year, ranging from apparent complete beginner to top New Zealand skiers.

It's a great fun event and I'm sure you will enjoy it, and the training day (which in the context of serious race programmes is more like a mountain orientation day). So, correct me if I'm wrong but you're not thinking of joining a race academy or anything like that.

Yes, I am doing that but I'm doing the Waikato Secondary School's Ski & Snowboard champs. Last year I kinda got off balance because of a bump I couldn't see...

post #30 of 61
Thread Starter 

Whoops, 19, not 18.

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