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for your eyes only.... :) - Page 3

post #61 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Care to elaborate?
Well... It would probably be best if I didn't....

I will say this though....

Sometimes bad advice is 90% good advice...
And good advice is sometimes 90% bad...
And sometimes today's good advice completely contradicts yesterday's good advice
And then tomorrow's advice turns out to be both good and bad...

Geez... I hate it when I talk like this... wink.gif
Edited by LouD-Reno - 6/29/14 at 10:16pm
post #62 of 82

Not to worry, you must have learned something from following the old advice, and with that knowledge in hand the new advice will lead to even better learning than if you had gone straight to it. :)

post #63 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

The assumption here seems to be that everyone who's ever ran gates is a great skier... isnt the truth. The FIS points don't lie though. The other is simple semantics... A 'masters' camp is usually interchangeable with 'adult', not top level masters who happen to be going to a summer camp. smile.gif

This!    Judging by most of the participants on the video, most of these are first -timers, drawn to the camp more by the Mahre name than serious Masters racers looking to improve.  And yes, we do get complete first-imers in masters racing, and we always make sure they are very welcome, everyone has to start somewhere and work their way up the field.  But in most Divisions the general standard is a whole lot higher.  Incidentally the most populous and competitive classes in Far West masters tend to be 55-59 and 60-64.  Last season the Mens 55-59 class was normally >20% of the field with 15+ starters.  From that there were at least 6 of us who were capable of winning the class on the day, as well as finishing in top 10 overall. 

 

One of the other great aspect of Masters is that for the second run the start order is slowest first which also helps for newcomers.  And, even if you are not in contention for the podium, most people find a "target" that is a little quicker than them and focus on beating them regularly, then selecting the next "target" 

post #64 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post


When Sean was on the PSIA demo team...

Yeah... I've had the pleasure of skiing with Sean as well... in fact he was the first person to tell me my kids were better than me... (when they were 10 & 12 respectively)... he said he meant it as a complement... so I let it slide.... wink.gif

guess he was right though, cuz' everyone else says it now as well... biggrin.gif
Edited by LouD-Reno - 6/29/14 at 10:24pm
post #65 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

I would agree if it was free skiing. But training it's a different thing.

Sorry for the OT.

The thing is... at least here in psia-w... you gotta train in conditions like this... the L3 is expected to ski to "the standard" in conditions similar to these in the exam, as I have experienced 1st hand... if you haven't trained for this, extensively... you will find yourself out of your comfort zone in a hurry... in the exam... as I have experienced 1st hand wink.gif
post #66 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouD-Reno View Post


The thing is... at least here in psia-w... you gotta train in conditions like this... the L3 is expected to ski to "the standard" in conditions similar to these in the exam, as I have experienced 1st hand... if you haven't trained for this, extensively... you will find yourself out of your comfort zone in a hurry... in the exam... as I have experienced 1st hand wink.gif

 

Training for an exam is one thing. Running gates, (which jzamp is referring to) is another creature all together. Lindsey Vonn knows something about this. :)

 

... and I've yet to see gates in a PSIA exam. ;) 

post #67 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Many of those skiers in the vid are in the back seat, hanging on for dear life.  I bet they aren't going to fix that doing a couple of runs on their own.

There are other "fundamental" issues as well that they need to work on.  It's not just timing and line choice.

How do race coaches deal with that?

This particular case is a tricky one. I think a lot of the issues here show up because of fear issues skiing a salted icy rut. It hurts like ... to fall.

Difficult to practice that outside the course. Mileage in varied terrain like frozen off-groomers etc helps but not much you can do about it just by skiing a couple of runs outside the gates. 

post #68 of 82
... And summer camps for the level of skier in the vids is really about having a fun new experience and picking up a thing or two that might help their general skiing. For many, realizing how much more easy it is to 'struggle' than they're used to is a positive eye opener. Just when you think you're good, gates have a way of letting you know what you need to sort out in your skiing. That, in turn, CAN be worked on during the regular season outside the gates. smile.gif
post #69 of 82

Good point.  

post #70 of 82
Originally Posted by LouD-Reno View Post

I will say this though....

Sometimes bad advice is 90% good advice...
And good advice is sometimes 90% bad...
And sometimes today's good advice completely contradicts yesterday's good advice
And then tomorrow's advice turns out to be both good and bad...

Geez... I hate it when I talk like this... wink.gif

 

Yup.  I totally know what you mean.  

post #71 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post
 
most of these are first -timers, drawn to the camp more by the Mahre name than serious Masters racers looking to improve.  And yes, we do get complete first-imers in masters racing, and we always make sure they are very welcome, everyone has to start somewhere and work their way up the field.  But in most Divisions the general standard is a whole lot higher. 

 

Okay, this answers the question I had earlier in the thread. Thanks. For some reason I had formed the impression that you had to qualify in some way to race Masters. That's what was confusing me.

 

(markojp, I'll look more carefully at your links, too. Guess I could have done my own Googling on that. Doh. Not to mention reading the USSA flyer that sought out my mailbox somehow and is now sitting at the bottom of the magazine basket in the bathroom.  :rolleyes)

post #72 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post



... and I've yet to see gates in a PSIA exam. wink.gif  

Gates have been in and out of PSIA exams from the beginning. I had to ski through gates (untimed) for both my LII and LIII back in the 1970s. Some divisions today rely on a Nastar finish as part of the requirements.
post #73 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

... And summer camps for the level of skier in the vids is really about having a fun new experience and picking up a thing or two that might help their general skiing. For many, realizing how much more easy it is to 'struggle' than they're used to is a positive eye opener. Just when you think you're good, gates have a way of letting you know what you need to sort out in your skiing. That, in turn, CAN be worked on during the regular season outside the gates. smile.gif


So true! Gates can be a very humbling experience at first because you can't "turn shop". The discipline and reaction it forces into your skiing is one of the reasons why it drives so much improvement overall.
post #74 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Gates have been in and out of PSIA exams from the beginning. I had to ski through gates (untimed) for both my LII and LIII back in the 1970s. Some divisions today rely on a Nastar finish as part of the requirements.

I'm new to the whole PSIA thing, Kneale. smile.gif Honesty, they really should be part of L3 nat'l standard in some form... IMHO of course. smile.gif
post #75 of 82

In Rocky Mountain, you have to get NASTAR silver for Level 2 and gold for Level 3. I believe you have to send in your results before taking the exam.

post #76 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

So true! Gates can be a very humbling experience at first because you can't "turn shop".

 

There was a whole thread - or part of a thread - a while ago on what "turn shopping" meant. As I recall, there was some confusion / disagreement about what the definition was. The best I could do was something like, "I can't define it, but I know it when I see it." Your post here switched light bulb on for me. From now on if it ever comes up again, I'll just say, "Well, it's the opposite of what you have to do when you run gates." It may be an indirect answer, but it nonetheless feels a pretty good one to me.

post #77 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 

 

... and I've yet to see gates in a PSIA exam. ;)

Nancy beat me to it...

 

Mike

post #78 of 82
Nancy? Shirley you're joking.
post #79 of 82

In Europe many systems require passing the EuroTest for their upper certification levels. It is basically a FIS GS course and to pass you have to be within 18% of a time equivalent of Zero FIS points.

In practice this means that on a one minute course you can be about 10 seconds slower than Ligety.

post #80 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


... and I've yet to see gates in a PSIA exam. wink.gif  

If conditions are right, and the mountain has the resources we have had to run gates. One year it was a masters GS course, not just an easy nastar.

While it was not timed, scored heavily PSIA-W has made us run plenty for LIII

Lou,

Having skied an exam with you, I would love to work with you on your skiing. It woud be good for my training as well.

Any time you are going to be at Sugarbowl, shoot me a PM. If I'm around I'll try to clear some time to take some runs with you.

Re changes in conditions causing a different reaction specifically in fore-aft balance, it should and will. You mentioned setting more forward lean, but IIRC that may be the opposite of what you need. Go talk to Bud and have him take a look at your ROM on your ankle and also your stance (in your boots and skis) or when you come to Sugarbowl, I can take a look.

I like the symetry you have begun to create. That's getting better. I agree with the several people letting you know about the pop.
And the hands.... I think we were working on that during the exam. It's better but still needs work.
post #81 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post


Lou,

Having skied an exam with you, I would love to work with you on your skiing. It woud be good for my training as well.

Any time you are going to be at Sugarbowl...

I actually will be at Sugarbowl a lot the coming season... Won't be my home mtn, but I'll have a pass so... smile.gif. Regarding the boots... I've been back and forth.... I'll explain when we're on the slopes smile.gif...

Lou
post #82 of 82
Thread Starter 

A little more Mt Hood Mahre masters camp action.... June 2014.... :)

 

 

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