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Five Ten Shoes vs Clipless - Page 7

post #181 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
 

If you can make all your climbs and descents clipped, then consider riding more difficult trails.  

 

lol I can make them because I am clipped in. I am a lot of things but I am not someone to shy away from difficult trails up or down and like I said I am faster than most......skill wise I am not that good but I have 31 inch quads and can out pedal nearly anyone especially in short spurts.  

 

:ROTF  Well, I'm not going to argue with fat quads and (nearly) the fastest sprinter on his block. But if you'll go back and read, my point is that there are some places that are so tough that they have to be hiked.  If you're not aware of them, that's fine, but your mission-posting about clipless pedals makes it look like you don't know about those tough place and/or that you only ride stuff that is within your comfort zone...NTTAWWT.

 

Quote:
 seriously dude do you even MTB? I have not seen one piece of stoke or advice from you. 

 

Oh, I'm a total Barney.  I read this forum to learn things, but I find that every now and then I can help someone - in this case, you.  

post #182 of 198

Alsacia is loving her Hope pedals. Did you ever get setup on flats yet Trish? Whiteroom had his 2nd ride on new 5.10 Minnaars yesterday. They are interesting because they allow the cleat to go way back so you stand on the pedals like you would on a flat. I think the jury is still out on that one.

post #183 of 198
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

Alsacia is loving her Hope pedals. Did you ever get setup on flats yet Trish? Whiteroom had his 2nd ride on new 5.10 Minnaars yesterday. They are interesting because they allow the cleat to go way back so you stand on the pedals like you would on a flat. I think the jury is still out on that one.

Actually, I got the shoes but not the pedals, just prior to our trip two weeks ago.  Now that I'm back home I'll get on the pedals.

 

I should call Hope to get some more info on availability in my area. 

post #184 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post


eh I do not think you are following.

I'm following. I am just waiting for some video that is more than pumping or berm riding biggrin.gif
post #185 of 198

Some of the trails I ride when in Santa Barbara have stretches where hike a bike is absolutely required no matter what you're riding or who you are.  They are just physically impossible to clear... and pretty tough to clear even on the way back down (but do-able for very good riders).

 

I do agree, though, that flats probably lead to more hike a biking than is always necessary.

post #186 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

I do agree, though, that flats probably lead to more hike a biking than is always necessary.

My shins are starting to agree smile.gif. Although I also have stuff uphill where you can forget about pedal clearance from 5 to 7 o'clock. Hiking, we are.

One thing I wonder about clipless is if you have to unclip on a rough uphill, are you toast because you need some runway to clip back in (both shoes)?

We decided to ride the fave downhill on the upside in order to take the new section down. Good choice biggrin.gif.
post #187 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

One thing I wonder about clipless is if you have to unclip on a rough uphill, are you toast because you need some runway to clip back in (both shoes)?

 

It varies a lot obviously depending on how tough the terrain is in comparison to your skill level, and how good you are at clipping in... but in my experience if I think I'm starting up in a tricky spot, I just won't clip that second foot in until I've got a little momentum.  It's not a big deal to do a couple pedal revolutions unclipped to get moving again.  I find that I can *usually* clip that second foot in with the proper pressure and a little wiggle as long as I'm in the right spot on the pedal; I don't have to stop pedaling completely to do it.

 

Note: this is with SPD cleats and pedals that are set relatively loose, I don't know if it's easier or harder with other types or with a different tension setting.

post #188 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

One thing I wonder about clipless is if you have to unclip on a rough uphill, are you toast because you need some runway to clip back in (both shoes)?

 

It varies a lot obviously depending on how tough the terrain is in comparison to your skill level, and how good you are at clipping in... but in my experience if I think I'm starting up in a tricky spot, I just won't clip that second foot in until I've got a little momentum.  It's not a big deal to do a couple pedal revolutions unclipped to get moving again.  I find that I can *usually* clip that second foot in with the proper pressure and a little wiggle as long as I'm in the right spot on the pedal; I don't have to stop pedaling completely to do it.

 

Note: this is with SPD cleats and pedals that are set relatively loose, I don't know if it's easier or harder with other types or with a different tension setting.

 

Yeah, there are a lot of variables with this, notably including what the bottom of your particular pair of shoes looks like. Some "MTB" shoes (like Sidis) are essentially road shoes with the holes drilled differently and a couple of tiny strips of rubber glued on for decoration. They're like ice skates when you're not clipped in. Others (example: Giro Privateer) have good coverage of real tread that helps you to pedal briefly even when not clipped in. Similarly, a pedal with a bit of a platform helps a lot. For example, these:

 

But mostly it's a skill that you learn by necessity. And yes, you always need a runway. But for some people in some situations the runway is six inches, while for others it's twenty feet.

post #189 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

Yeah, there are a lot of variables with this, notably including what the bottom of your particular pair of shoes looks like. Some "MTB" shoes (like Sidis) are essentially road shoes with the holes drilled differently and a couple of tiny strips of rubber glued on for decoration. They're like ice skates when you're not clipped in. Others (example: Giro Privateer) have good coverage of real tread that helps you to pedal briefly even when not clipped in.

 

Excellent point.

post #190 of 198

I am anxiously awaiting a @Trekchick report on how she likes her FiveTens! I have now crashed 3 times in my new pedals/shoes and dammit, each time I tried to unclip to do a check and couldn't get out! The last one was pretty nasty. Deep gashes on my elbow and leg, and jammed my thumb. I was fine, but while finishing the ride I was rattled the entire time. That being said, it was our first trip to ride PCMR and I have to say, the trails there are great! I just desperately need a clinic.

 

Here I am pre-crash, smiling even after 4 miles of climbing!

 

post #191 of 198
Thread Starter 

Ugh, 

I got back from our road trip a week ago, have ordered my pedals and will be getting out on the bike soon.  Sorry for the delay.  Meanwhile...@contesstant you look like you're enjoying your set up. 

post #192 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Ugh, 

I got back from our road trip a week ago, have ordered my pedals and will be getting out on the bike soon.  Sorry for the delay.  Meanwhile...@contesstant you look like you're enjoying your set up. 


I am enjoying the bike and even more enjoying spending time with the amazing women I have met! They inspire me! The ride in PC was with them and Matt. Poor Matt :D We broke into three groups--Matt and one of the gals who is FAST, another gal who I have dubbed my biking "Mojo" and me, then a slower group. Yaay for not being in the slow group. My "mojo" rider sets the perfect pace for me on climbs. I tend to not pace myself very well then get really worn out. When I ride with her, I follow and am forced to slow it down a bit. 

 

While I continue debating going to flat pedals, I am going to switch back to my Shimano set up because they are definitely easier to pop out of in a hurry. I just hope they're not TOO easy to pop out of.

post #193 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 

I am anxiously awaiting a @Trekchick report on how she likes her FiveTens! I have now crashed 3 times in my new pedals/shoes and dammit, each time I tried to unclip to do a check and couldn't get out! The last one was pretty nasty. Deep gashes on my elbow and leg, and jammed my thumb. I was fine, but while finishing the ride I was rattled the entire time. That being said, it was our first trip to ride PCMR and I have to say, the trails there are great! I just desperately need a clinic.

Ouch!

 

Besides real injury, I think the worst thing about crashing is the impact on confidence, sometimes it is difficult to just shake it off if it shakes you up.

post #194 of 198
Thread Starter 

Ditto what @4ster  said.  @contesstant  Coming back from a confidence break can be tough.  I like it that you're riding with a group that is encouraging your confidence.  You go girl!!

post #195 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
 

Ouch!

 

Besides real injury, I think the worst thing about crashing is the impact on confidence, sometimes it is difficult to just shake it off if it shakes you up.


Yes, I do believe my adrenals were empty about 15 minutes later--I was toast and we still had a lot more downhill to go, and it was not beginner downhill. I must be sick in the head because I can't wait to ride again! I guess what I lack in natural talent I make up for in determination. Same holds true with skiing :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Ditto what @4ster  said.  @contesstant  Coming back from a confidence break can be tough.  I like it that you're riding with a group that is encouraging your confidence.  You go girl!!

What's funny is the ladies are in a MOMS group. When I moved here, a mutual acquaintance told me I needed to join this moms group. I don't DO moms groups. Then I met this group. Let's just say MOMS stands for something that has to do with Moms Drinking on Sundays. ;) Better yet is they all ski!

post #196 of 198
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 


Yes, I do believe my adrenals were empty about 15 minutes later--I was toast and we still had a lot more downhill to go, and it was not beginner downhill. I must be sick in the head because I can't wait to ride again! I guess what I lack in natural talent I make up for in determination. Same holds true with skiing :)

What's funny is the ladies are in a MOMS group. When I moved here, a mutual acquaintance told me I needed to join this moms group. I don't DO moms groups. Then I met this group. Let's just say MOMS stands for something that has to do with Moms Drinking on Sundays. ;) Better yet is they all ski!

Yeah, there is a different vibe in MOMS groups in Utah, Tahoe, Summit County......

A casual Sunday afternoon walk should be accompanied with a back country pack and 2 days supply of water. 

post #197 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Ditto what @4ster  said.  @contesstant  Coming back from a confidence break can be tough.  I like it that you're riding with a group that is encouraging your confidence.  You go girl!!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Yeah, there is a different vibe in MOMS groups in Utah, Tahoe, Summit County......

A casual Sunday afternoon walk should be accompanied with a back country pack and 2 days supply of water. 


So true! I went on a "hike" with them which they had dubbed the "death march." We climbed and climbed and climbed with very few switchbacks. I was about dead when we got to the top! It was great!

post #198 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

Ouch!

Besides real injury, I think the worst thing about crashing is the impact on confidence, sometimes it is difficult to just shake it off if it shakes you up.

Definitely tough. I managed a OTB yesterday. Decent drop with an immediate turn and I turned too quick. Caught myself forward and mostly got away from the bike, but hip bone on a big rock and a general beating wasn't too easy to shake off.

A friend had a road bike crash on Sat, though, and she was bloody face to lower legs. MTB is much safer smile.gif.
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