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Ski Cities to Move to. - Page 8

post #211 of 224
Before I figured out I preferred not drinking at all my standard beer order in the local PC pubs was Hop Rising (Squatters). 9% alcohol by volume. No problem buying it from the State stores as well.

If you think Utah's state monopoly on liquor sales is aggregious, which it is, check out John Oliver's end of season segment on state lotteries.
post #212 of 224

It's not the lower alcohol content that does me in with 3.2, it doesn't taste the same.  I don't need to get drunk, but sometimes I crave the flavor of a good beer.

 

From what I have been told, and read they either bake off the alcohol or the dilute the beer to get it to meet the 3.2 standards.  Sorry but a 3.2 beer does not taste the same as it's counterpart for me, and for many people I know.

 

I lived in Utah for 2 years, Colorado for 8, and Minnesota for roughly 30.  All 3 states have 3.2 (Minnesota in grocery stores, gas stations, etc. and is the only beer you can buy on Sundays outside of a bar/restaurant).  I haven't had a conversation with anyone that likes the 3.2 beer version as much as they like the regular version of the same beer.

 

I'm far from an expert on 3.2, and I didn't mean for my post to hijack the thread turning it into a 3.2 beer discussion.  I just don't like it, especially with the darker heavier beers that I for some reason tend to enjoy more after I ski.

post #213 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by wyowindrunner View Post
 

Lived in Evanston Wyoming (45 minutes from Park City) back in the day.  Local booze  stores and the porno shop always had a bunch of Utah plates parked in the lots.  Was always a local joke.  If you pick a place to live based on the drinking laws and beer....maybe you should consider Milwaukee or St. Louis?  Don't know how the skiing there is though.

 

Actually, for the beer, that would lend itself to NorCal / Reno again.  The home of microbrewing.

post #214 of 224
post #215 of 224

There are more bad (or meh) craft beers out there than good, so collective totals don't really mean much IMO.

post #216 of 224
Well, not sure how some dubious claim like "home" is going to ensure good beer, either.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

There are more bad (or meh) craft beers out there than good, so collective totals don't really mean much IMO.
post #217 of 224

Looks like the West Coast (the real one, not the skiing one) is craft brew Mecca.  California #1, Washington #2, Oregon #3 in the total number of craft breweries.  Makes me puffed up and proud!

 

Craft brews are very focused and when someone complains about one, you'll find a bunch of folks who think it's the best beer in the world.  The most well known and popular brewery in my town has beer that is passable by my standards, and the one that is the least popular (but still does a good business) has won a number of medals at the world beer competitions in Germany, including a couple of golds.  Their Chukanut Vienna Lager is true heaven in a glass.

post #218 of 224
Our standard college session beer was a nice 3.6% IPA. Don't want to be drinking 4.5% beer when you've got 9-10 Imperial pints to drink on a rugby session.
post #219 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Well, not sure how some dubious claim like "home" is going to ensure good beer, either.

 

Because that's where the movement got started (it's far from a dubious claim) and some of the most talented brewers in the country still make beer in NorCal.  Go check out Beer Advocate and look up the top 100 craft beers and report back.

 

And of course Oregon and Washington are right there too.

post #220 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

And people in hell want a glass of ice water.

I am going to want a beer. Preferably dark and high ABV.
post #221 of 224

Low-point beer, which is often known in America as "three-two beer" or "3 point 2 brew", is beer that contains 3.2% alcohol by weight (equivalent to 4.2% ABV).  In the United States, most reduced-alcohol beers, including Bud Light, Coors Light, and Miller Lite have 4.2% ABV.[8] This is a 16% reduction in alcohol compared to beer that has 5% ABV.   The above is taken from wikapedia.  The MillerCoors site says close to the same thing.  I never took the coors brewery tour back when there was only Coors, no Coors Light or whatever else they make now (marketed in only eleven western states- would not sell it in Washington, and Olympia would not sell beer in Colorado), people that did take the tour said that the brewery then only had three vats and one was always down for cleaning- all beer was the same-just put in different cans.  Think this thread has gone off the track?

post #222 of 224

Oberlin, Ohio, where I went to college, allowed only 3.2 beer within city limits at the time, although we could drink it at age 18. (We almost made beer in the coop, of uncertain alcohol content, dubious legality, and vile taste). No one would ever mistake Oberlin for a ski town, 

post #223 of 224

I've been drinking beer in Utah since around 1969.  Like a lot of the country back then, I was limited to mostly the big brewers, so I drank Coors, Budweiser, Fisher (local product), etc.

 

As I started traveling around the country and the bigger world in the '70s, I developed a taste for different beers.

 

In the 80's I started home-brewing so I could enjoy some of these types of beer, here in Utah.

 

When the brew pubs and craft-beers started appearing here in SLC, I quit making my own beer.

 

Ten or twelve years ago I went to a local brewer's "Beer School"

 

http://www.utahstories.com/2011/06/beer-stories-desert-edge/

 

This was before the local brewers could produce anything stronger than 4% beer.  I asked the brew master if he had no restrictions, what would he change.

 

He said he would make a true IPA and a stronger Porter.  He said that he was actually brewing most of his stuff "to style".

 

Having said all this, I drink mostly strong bottled local beer.  I would love to be able to get these same beers on tap.

 

But hey, you used to have to fill out a card in the State Liquor Store, with your name and address, hand it to the clerk, and they would fetch your bottle of booze from behind the counter!

 

So things aren't really so bad. 

 

Skiing's not too bad either, sometimes.

post #224 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzzo View Post

Before I figured out I preferred not drinking at all my standard beer order in the local PC pubs was Hop Rising (Squatters). 9% alcohol by volume. No problem buying it from the State stores as well.

If you think Utah's state monopoly on liquor sales is aggregious, which it is, check out John Oliver's end of season segment on state lotteries.

Highly recommend Hop Rising. Also, one of my favorites. And the sking is not bad either. 

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