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Was Bluray a Flop?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Mods feel free to move this to the lounge if it doesn't belong here as non ski related.

 

Went and spent some time flipping through the movie racks at the store this weekend.  I was somewhat surprised to see that there are still as many things available on DVD as there are on Bluray, perhaps even more still on DVD.  What is most evident is that the streaming, on demand content seem to be what people use the Bluray for way more than watching Bluray disks.  I would appear that the Roku and streaming content devices are already more successful and popular than the Bluray disk format.  Would anyone else agree that the Bluray just never fulfilled expectations? 

 

I realize that the DVD is also pretty much over, but would call that format a bigger success than Bluray overall.

post #2 of 29
I think while it was successful (at least in Australia) for a couple of years, it was superseded very quickly by internet streaming, which didn't require people to get off the couch to use/purchase.
post #3 of 29

I think at this point any media on a hard format does not have a chance. BluRay was just too late and on the cusp of downloadable media.  There are movies that I have had on almost every format, The Blue Brothers come to mind. my first copy was on Beta that I paid $39.95 for, then had Laser Disc, DVD, DVD HD and BluBRay then Blu RAY SE. 

post #4 of 29
Here I've been buying two disk sets for that day I have a BluRay player..
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 

If the Bluray player didn't also stream movie and TV content from the internet the penetration would probably be less than 10% of DVD diffusion.  Game consoles also cannibalized the Bluray market share since they also play the disks and stream internet content.

post #6 of 29

There is still hope for BluRay!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 
Quote:
 Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
,,,

Exactly. 

 

In truth, I almost completely agree with Ronin about a lot of what he says. And it's precisely why there exists no video of my skiing.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Plenty exists, I just haven't posted it. I am planning on producing a 6 DVD BluRay compilation. 

From what I hear the beer pong will videos will sell much better

 
post #7 of 29

One place that Blu-ray is growing rapidly is for long term, near-line storage of massive datasets.   Amazon's "Glacier" service is powered by many racks of blue ray players/disks serviced by robots.

Facebook does some of its backup using a similar system.

 

http://storagemojo.com/2014/04/25/amazons-glacier-secret-bdxl/

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Game consoles also cannibalized the Bluray market share since they also play the disks and stream internet content.

 

That's not cannibalizing the market at all.  The market isn't the players; no one really expects to make very much money selling hardware.  The market is the content, that's where the money is.  And being able to play blurays on PS3's and PS4's just broadens the market.

 

Anyway Phil's right.  Bluray just came too late and too close to the start of the migration away from physical media.

post #9 of 29

I can't say it was unsuccessful but I never bought bluray until I got the Xbox one.  When I do buy Bluray I make sure it has the digital copy because I think a service like Vudu is where the future is heading

post #10 of 29
Bluray is one of our big success stories here at Luddites-R-US. So late at technology adoption that it came and went before we wasted any money on it:-)
post #11 of 29

Great for video games.

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post
 

 

That's not cannibalizing the market at all.  The market isn't the players; no one really expects to make very much money selling hardware.  The market is the content, that's where the money is.  And being able to play blurays on PS3's and PS4's just broadens the market.

 

 

IDK..  The game consoles are still pretty spendy hardware sets.  And, the content is now mostly streamed or downloaded.  It isn't the same thing as buying a $30 printer that takes $40 in ink cartridges every week or two.  Hardware in video game consoles is still a solid product category.  Bluray and DVD were intended to eat some cost to sell the disks but not so much anymore.  Game consoles still command a premium though..

 

FWIW. we bought or made hundreds of DVDs over the past decade but probably only bought four or five Bluray discs before download/streaming became the medium of choice.  I packed up the movie wall unit and stored it while the living room floors were being sanded and refinished.  I'm not even sure I will ever put the discs back on the shelf because we hardly ever use them now.  I play more vinyl than CDs in a player.  90%+ of the media we use day to day is on hard drives or clouds easily accessible from anywhere.

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

IDK..  The game consoles are still pretty spendy hardware sets.  And, the content is now mostly streamed or downloaded.  It isn't the same thing as buying a $30 printer that takes $40 in ink cartridges every week or two.  Hardware in video game consoles is still a solid product category.  Bluray and DVD were intended to eat some cost to sell the disks but not so much anymore.  Game consoles still command a premium though..

 

Check this out: http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2013-09-20-sony-expects-to-recoup-playstation-4-hardware-loss-at-launch

 

At launch time last year, Sony was expecting to *lose* $60 on each PS4 sold.  The xbox one is in the same boat, as were the previous generation consoles.  By the end of a console's life cycle, the hardware itself is finally making a profit because the specs never change but component prices drop over the years.  But in general, game consoles are absolutely intended to make money by selling you games.

post #14 of 29

We use bluray data drives to back up our audio files.  Years ago it was CD's, then DVD's now Bluray.  When thumb drives come down in price more we may use those, but for now it's the best option.  

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post
 

 

Check this out: http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2013-09-20-sony-expects-to-recoup-playstation-4-hardware-loss-at-launch

 

At launch time last year, Sony was expecting to *lose* $60 on each PS4 sold.  The xbox one is in the same boat, as were the previous generation consoles.  By the end of a console's life cycle, the hardware itself is finally making a profit because the specs never change but component prices drop over the years.  But in general, game consoles are absolutely intended to make money by selling you games.


I suspect part of that isn't due to their desire to field a loss leader but also due to price wars with competitors.  They all launch their new thing every other holiday season against each other right?   They'd give them away for free or close to it if they really had to though right?

post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

We use bluray data drives to back up our audio files.  Years ago it was CD's, then DVD's now Bluray.  When thumb drives come down in price more we may use those, but for now it's the best option.  

 

Don't real servers and drives have the potential to wear out or fail?  I thought everything servers and hard discs needs back up back ups hahahaha.  DVD/Bluray discs should stay discs for centuries but they probably won't have a device to read them easily,

post #17 of 29

The neighborhood where I live has insufficient bandwidth for reliably smooth streaming. As a result, I still rent Blurays. Don't own many, though.

 

Certain classics of cinematography do demand ownership in a high definition wide aspect ratio format.

post #18 of 29
The repeater or whatever is too far from our house to get over a certain bandwidth/speed. The cable company refuses to run line out as far as we are. So, yeah, still relying on Netflix envelopes.

And the satellite guy just got done removing two trees so we could have TV. He told us next we're going to have to relocate the dish.
post #19 of 29

Besides, there's better selection, far closer to what I *want* to watch than I what I happen to be steered to,  in the envelopes anyway.

 

But, yes, if Blu Ray doesn't suck it up and get a 4K format, it's going to be a de facto flop.     And Sony will really need to jump into the drivers seat on that one.
 

 

 

 

 

post #20 of 29

I have a library of about 200 DVDs in my Vermont condo and rarely watch them anymore.  The Roku delivers really sharp video.  Once in a while I have the urge to watch something I can't get on Netflix.

 

Haven't watched Napoleon Dynamite in a while.  It's available on DVD from Netflix but not streaming.

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

We use bluray data drives to back up our audio files.  Years ago it was CD's, then DVD's now Bluray.  When thumb drives come down in price more we may use those, but for now it's the best option.

Why not just use an external hard drive they take up about an equivalent size of a stack of discs.

 

Quick search on Amazon yields a 2 TB external hard drive for 79.99 and 50 dual layer Blu Rays for 119.90

 

2048 Gb at 79.99 yields 3.9 cents/GB

 

50*50gb=2500 Gb at 119.90 yields 4.9 cents/GB

post #22 of 29
Hard drives are not good long-term storage. If sitting without being powered up they die. I'm talking about for a number of years.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 

In another somewhat related :ahijack:

 

I can't help but wonder about the growing number of people that trust free or low cost cloud storage for their photos and videos without hard disk back ups.  I know it isn't feasible for the kid that uses only a smartphone or tablet... but imagine the global angst if one day YouTube or Instagram suddenly announced they were folding (spun off their parent corp) and had to delete all content from their servers and liquidate their assets.  People would be freaking out all over the place hahahahaha..

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Hard drives are not good long-term storage. If sitting without being powered up they die. I'm talking about for a number of years.

 

Yep.   Imagine migrating all that every ~3 years.

post #25 of 29

Composed produced music for TV in the 70s and 80's.  Transferred masters from tape to DAT to CD, should get them on HD soon.

 

Nothing will be readable in 1,000 years except paper.  That's what the library of congress does with anything really important.  Print it.  The Blu-rays may be intact and readable (maybe) but there will no players to read them in 1,000 years.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 The Blu-rays may be intact and readable (maybe) but there will no players to read them in 1,000 years.

 

 

People say that, but I don't really believe it.     By that point we will have technology that can trivially read such things, much like today we have technology that can trivially recreate an Oakeshot type XVI.   By 'trivially' I mean "without significant research, with zero technological re-discovery, and at comparatively low cost to the end user".

 

I do doubt that the physical record will survive.   People have *way* too much faith in the durability of plastic and metal coatings thereon.

post #27 of 29

You're assuming the thread of human development continues without some kind of mass extinction between now and 3014 or 4014.  Asteroid, global war, plague, drought.  

 

What we see now as technological development is barely 100 years of human innovation.  10 or 20 more of those centuries and yes we would be very advanced technologically - otherwise.  Paper records might be found from creatures evolved from some small life form now alive, that will be the only one to survive the global catastrophe.  Those evolved creatures come across a DVD.  No chance.  Come across a book.   I think they'd figure it out with some time.

 

Sorry watched all of Cosmos.

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

You're assuming the thread of human development continues without some kind of mass extinction between now and 3014 or 4014.  Asteroid, global war, plague, drought.  

 

Sure, for it hardly seems germane to talk of records survival to benefit  the other options:

1) A hypothetical successor species after our total extinction, for that we would need at least one and probably three orders of magnitude  greater durability than 10 centuries.    I call this the trivial-million-or-go-home.     This sort of records survival we simply cannot do at present in-home technologies - and if we could we would have an insane trash problem on our hands.  

 

I call this the  "Using this society's resources to create records, or monuments, or anything that can survive long enough for a *second* intelligent species to evolve is a complete and total waste of resources"  argument.

 

2) Alien species visiting us after a total extinction event or a knowledge-reducing apocalypse, the aliens having roughly the same tech levels as we do right now,  except for a star drive. 

This is the only option for which knowledge storage at our present in-home tech levels makes sense.   However, as extant aliens with a star drive are unlikely, having them be at the same tech levels as us right now AND having them visit us after a knowledge apocalypse is vanishingly (vanishingly squared) less likely.      Not a particular direction I would consider prepping in.    


I call this the "Yep, they have a cosmos-spanning physics, but they'd watch Dukes of Hazard if only their computers could figure out how" scenario.    It's even appealing, in an utterly self-centered but ridiculous sort of way.

 

3) Alien species visiting us after a total extinction event or a knowledge apocalypse, but at a significantly *greater* tech levels than us right now.    You will perceive that there is no substantive difference between this scenario and the one we were discussing in previous posts


So this is not really a seriously distinct option, but we can call it the "A green tentacle can hold a super-high-res or light field camera to the bottom of a Bluray as well as a humanoid arm can"  scenario.     No separate planning required.  

 

4) /Partial/ knowledge apocalypse where we are *not* extinct but our technology level is severely reduced.   

 

I call this the Mad Max Does Mediaeval Europe scenario.   My response to this one is similar to my response to number 1), i.e. "Let's not waste resources prepping for it"  but it's modified with the addendum of "What makes you think Bluray machines will be obsolete?   It could happen next week if it could happen at all". 

post #29 of 29

Great post cantunamunch.

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