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Yet another "One Ski" thread

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I know that there are dozens of threads discussing the optimal selection for a one ski quiver and I've read most of them. While there is great advice in them, it's hard to distill it down, so I thought it may be worthwhile to repeat the exercise with some limiting parameters for that one ski recommendation:

 

  1. Assume it will be used 80% of the time in the North American west but not limited to one specific region (ie, should be able to competently handle variable western snow conditions from the Sierras to the Wasatch as well as some of the further reaches of the CanAm Rockies). The other 20% of the time, the ski will be used on the ice coast, from the Poconos up through ME High Peaks.
  2. Assume the ski must be durable and probably should use some reinforcement in its construction, such as Ti or composites.
  3. Assume the ski must be suitable for use at least down to the Level 7 ability range (ie, not limited to expert skiers).
  4. Assume that the ski needs to work well for a Level 7 skier in the 180 - 200 lb weight range.
  5. Assume the ski should have an MAP no greater than $750.

 

I'm sure we all agree that given the parameters above, one ski only is far less than ideal and will result in some compromises. While the best  answer is to have at least two sets of skis and probably more since the range of conditions is so broad, that's a different exercise.

 

Thoughts and suggestions? Are there things that haven't been properly accounted for in the exercise (which as must be obvious, is slanted toward a particular size/ability level)? Since for those of us the northern hemisphere at least, it's a long, hot slog through until ski season, I hope it will be a bit of relief to get some folks to pretend to put on their Moriarty hats (dating myself with this reference) and think snow as the weather continues to warm.

post #2 of 4

(no so) Elementary my dear poster. There are very well a dozen skis that will all do what you wan them to do. There are a lot of skis that will to the plethora of tasks you are asking for. 

 

I will start with the Nordica brothers, the NRGy90 & 100

add the following...

Line Sick Day 95

K2 Rictor90 and Annex98

Head Rev90 & Rev98

Rossi Experience 88

Volkl Mantra (100)

Salomon Quest 98

 

I am sure there are a few more that can be added but I have to run. 

 

All of these are viable choices with the narrower versions being better on the east bias and if you plan on adding a second bigger companion and the wider version for the western bias. There are some other models that are geared towards an expert/more aggressive skier that are not listed above. 

post #3 of 4

Charlie, I trust you realize a) that you haven't told us what you weigh or how tall you are, which has an impact on what skis will fit, or what you now ski on and how you like it, which will help with our sense of what you're after. And b) your list of needs is vaporware. A ski that excels out west in soft snow is not gonna excel back here on our ice. A bump ski ain't gonna rock in deep fresh. And so on. So IMO you should focus on where you do most of your skiing, and then think realistically about whether you are more likely to ski on groomers or off, on steep blacks with bumps or smoother blues without, and so on. 

 

Thread wander: Just for the record, no ski made uses titanium. Actually, no one would even like a titanium ski; it's 40% heavier than aluminum, and costs about 10X as much. It's major advantages over aluminum are double the melting temperature and greater strength, which are useful if you want to make warships out of skis to avoid the British experience in the Falklands. Rossi Smash could recommend some color schemes.

 

So whatever the marketing and graphics department or the college kid in the big box store says, says, their skis use Titanal, which is the deliberately misleading brand name for an alloy of aluminum without a drop of titanium in it, unless you want to worry about impurities and traces. But substitute "metal" for "titanium" and your point about durability is a good one. 

 

Moving along, Phil has a good list for out west with a smattering of back east. I'd argue that if you're a level 7, pretty much stick to groomers and some near off-piste, and - because of the "down to" rubric - are interested in getting better at carving turns routinely, something in the 80-90 mm range will be more useful than something in the 90-100 range. Most of the companies in the list make slightly narrower versions, or you could stick with some of the 90 mm ideas like the REV90 (which does not have metal but is a nice ski), or the E88 or Ricktor 90, which I think do. If you're a lighter guy, and are thinking more about off-piste in your future, the Blizzard Bushwacker is another ski to check out. Has a bit of metal, durable, can carve nicely, and great for what its name implies. 

 

Good luck!

post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

(no so) Elementary my dear poster. There are very well a dozen skis that will all do what you wan them to do. There are a lot of skis that will to the plethora of tasks you are asking for. 

 

I will start with the Nordica brothers, the NRGy90 & 100

add the following...

Line Sick Day 95

K2 Rictor90 and Annex98

Head Rev90 & Rev98

Rossi Experience 88

Volkl Mantra (100)

Salomon Quest 98

 

I am sure there are a few more that can be added . . .

A firm "mea culpa" as beyond points out in my use of Ti instead of simply "metal." I know that Al is 12 on the periodic table and Ti is 22 but assumed that "titanal" was Ti, just less of it than if it were an Al strip. The ingeniousness of the sports equipment marketing department is not to be underestimated.

 

And I realize that I haven't filled out the personal details to any great extent, but I am in fact that level 7 skier in the hypothetical, am in that weight range (OK, at the higher end of the given range) and really do ski something like a varied 80/20 west/east mix. Until fairly recently, I'd been renting but picked up LP90's last year and loved them, both in the deeper snow (and trees) at Alta/Snowbird/PCMR and locally in the Poconos. I recently picked up a pair of 2012 LP98s that I will look forward to trying this coming season, but also want to get an idea of what to try and demo, hence the post.

 

This year, I'll hopefully do a week at JH in early Feb, followed by another week in the SLC/PC area with a few days of eastern skiing both before and after the trip out west. I try to get off-piste and in the trees as often as possible but my skiing partners are far less adventurous, so I wind up spending more time on groomers than I'd like.

 

Some prospects that I find intriguing are the Line Influence and Liberty Variant 97 . . .Gotten some feedback on the Influence but not the Variant.


Edited by CharlieRN - 6/5/14 at 12:34pm
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