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post #271 of 286
When you ski the zipper line , do you actively retract your get to absorb the mogul, with very little impact or do you slam into the bump, letting you legs be pushed into absorption?

On slopes under 30 degrees, I generally try to retract
post #272 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

When you ski the zipper line , do you actively retract your get to absorb the mogul, with very little impact or do you slam into the bump, letting you legs be pushed into absorption?

On slopes under 30 degrees, I generally try to retract

For me it is more about speed...  Faster = more active (avalement), slower = more passive (Reploiment).

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by 4ster - 6/20/14 at 6:17pm
post #273 of 286

I thought I'd bump this thread with a re-run of a little story I previously posted about learning to ski through mileage:

 

In 30 years of skiing, I can point to 30 days that made me into the skier I am today.  Between semesters in college I bought a 30 day pass to Mary Jane.  This was before cheap passes, and I couldn't afford a season pass or lessons.   I had a group of friends who were great skiers and I could barely keep up (I'm fortunate to still ski with most today!), so I needed to improve.  

 

I was extremely motivated to get better and decided that maxing out my mileage in 30 days was my best hope, and all I could afford.  I skied 28 out of 30 days, everyday except Christmas and New Years.  I drove 130 miles round trip each day from Denver to Mary Jane.  I also checked out all the books and magazines on skiing from the local libraries and read them at night.   I was eating, breathing and sleeping skiing.

 

I mostly skied by myself, but occasionally would ski with a buddy and get some tips.  I made a rule that I couldn't go home until I skied every run that was open at least once, regardless of snow conditions.  The entire mountain was open by the second week.  They had just installed the high speed quad at the Jane, so there were no lines and it was a quick 8 mins lift to bumps, bumps and more bumps.   I believe this is where my Advil addiction started smile.gif

 

At first I had to stop numerous times on each run.  By the end of the 30 days I was skiing most runs top to bottom and I had skied myself into pretty good shape.  I was also much more smooth and efficient... better technique can develop out of necessity.   

 

When my out of state college friends returned from Xmas break they were amazed at how much I improved.   I remember them being dumbstruck.  They couldn't believe what they were seeing.  I went from pretty sucky to a decent skier in 30 days.   If you want to get better quickly, give it a try... YMMV!!

 

I originally posted that in this related thread that's worth a read to hear other's experiences on learning:

http://www.epicski.com/t/120578/taking-lessons-figuring-it-out-on-your-own-reading-how-to-books-etc/

post #274 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I also checked out all the books and magazines on skiing from the local libraries and read them at night.   I was eating, breathing and sleeping skiing.

 

I mostly skied by myself, but occasionally would ski with a buddy and get some tips

 

Basically you were taught by instructors through their writing supplemented with tips received on the hill from skiers that knew enough to identify areas that could be improved. And you spent 30 days putting that instruction to practice. That's a solid way to improve if you want to avoid the $$$ required for profession on-the-hill instruction. Much better than doing it with no instruction at all. I know guys that ski 100+ days per year that are still intermediate hacks because they eschew all forms of instruction.

post #275 of 286

I've been watching from sidelines here for a while.  I've enjoyed this thread especially in relation to the natural thing and what feels right and works. 

 

I came across a few things that I thought related well to some of the discussion earlier and I thought I would share. 

 

In skiing I have been aware of some debate about how much hip angulation someone should have. 


Here are a couple articles that discuss what this top race coach believes is the proper modern technique. He thinks that this way should become more prominent as time goes on.  Seems like an interesting point of view. The first one especially relates. 
1) http://www.youcanski.com/en/coaching/incline-to-win.htm

2) http://www.youcanski.com/en/coaching/tendencies.htm 

I enjoyed the interski video linked to earlier.  After looking closely and relating some of the topic of this thread, I think that in my own eye, the Italians may appear to be skiing the most naturally. They're way seems to mostly fit with what's in the article above. It seems to have a natural flow and I don't see any kinking or anything like that in their skiing.

The Italians: http://youtu.be/92gdN4-1GYo 


Edited by telemarkRS - 7/2/14 at 3:42pm
post #276 of 286

        

post #277 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by telemarkRS View Post
 

I've been watching from sidelines here for a while.  I've enjoyed this thread especially in relation to the natural thing and what feels right and works. 

 

I came across a few things that I thought related well to some of the discussion earlier and I thought I would share. 

 

In skiing I have been aware of some debate about how much hip angulation someone should have. 


Here is an article that discusses what this top race coach believes is the proper modern technique. He thinks that this way should become more prominent as time goes on.  Seems like an interesting point of view. 
1) http://www.youcanski.com/en/coaching/incline-to-win.htm

I enjoyed the interski video linked to earlier.  After looking closely and relating some of the topic of this thread, I think that in my own eye, the Italians may appear to be skiing the most naturally. They're way seems to mostly fit with what's in the article above. It seems to have a natural flow and I don't see any kinking or anything like that in their skiing.

The Italians: http://youtu.be/92gdN4-1GYo 

 

Nice first post.  Welcome to Epicski.

You are a tele skier?

post #278 of 286

Both : )

post #279 of 286

You race?

post #280 of 286

No, I just ski : )

post #281 of 286

Is there such a thing as "just ski?"

post #282 of 286

I used to compete but now I just ski for fun.  I like that a lot better. 

post #283 of 286

I too used to race.  I don't any more.  I get it.

post #284 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by telemarkRS View Post
 

I've been watching from sidelines here for a while.  I've enjoyed this thread especially in relation to the natural thing and what feels right and works. 

 

I came across a few things that I thought related well to some of the discussion earlier and I thought I would share. 

 

In skiing I have been aware of some debate about how much hip angulation someone should have. 


Here are a couple articles that discuss what this top race coach believes is the proper modern technique. He thinks that this way should become more prominent as time goes on.  Seems like an interesting point of view. The first one especially relates. 
1) http://www.youcanski.com/en/coaching/incline-to-win.htm

2) http://www.youcanski.com/en/coaching/tendencies.htm 

I enjoyed the interski video linked to earlier.  After looking closely and relating some of the topic of this thread, I think that in my own eye, the Italians may appear to be skiing the most naturally. They're way seems to mostly fit with what's in the article above. It seems to have a natural flow and I don't see any kinking or anything like that in their skiing.

The Italians: http://youtu.be/92gdN4-1GYo 

I read Greg's articles a few years ago, but I think he missed the point on why it can be a good idea to incline.

If you are interested in that subject this thread is a good read: http://www.epicski.com/t/119963/why-be-patient-at-turn-transition/30#post_1576917

post #285 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
 

I read Greg's articles a few years ago, but I think he missed the point on why it can be a good idea to incline.

 

Good comment. I'd go even farther and suggest that for recreational skiers its probably not a good idea to intentionally lean to start the turn.

post #286 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

When you ski the zipper line , do you actively retract your get to absorb the mogul, with very little impact or do you slam into the bump, letting you legs be pushed into absorption?

On slopes under 30 degrees, I generally try to retract

For me it is more about speed...  Faster = more active (avalement), slower = more passive (Reploiment).

 

 

Interesting... I've spent the last decade trying to smooth out my bump skiing so my knees hopefully last into old age.  I think I've ended up at the same place as 4ster on this question "naturally."  This is a great example of how one can improve their skiing just by the feel of how their skis interact with the snow.

 

It's pretty easy to feel how hard you are impacting each bump and decide the maximum impact you are willing to take.  At a lower speeds you can be more passive and not exceed your maximum impact.  As you pick up your speed, though, you'll need to more actively retract to keep the impact below your personal threshold.  The nice thing about bumps is each one give you immediate feedback as to how well you are skiing.

 

The other nice thing about bumps is they are a never ending challenge.  If you think you are skiing them well, just pick up you speed.  Few can appreciate how difficult it is to ski bumps smoothly as fast as the OP (I can't!), let alone Patrick Deneen.


Edited by tball - 7/3/14 at 9:38am
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