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Must watch - Kids react to old computers

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Oh how things have changed. 

post #2 of 29

Let's see Glen Plake's kids react to wooden skis, cable bindings, leather boots and wooden poles?

post #3 of 29

Wow. When I was, let's say about 10 -- if someone said "computer", most people thought "IBM", and pictured something about the size of a storage shed.

post #4 of 29

When I was 8 I got to see my first micro computer (a neighbor worked for NASA). It was about desk size and had to have switches flipped for each byte to load the registers to be booted up. By the time I got high school, the same computing power fit in your hand and was called a calculator.

post #5 of 29

When I was in second grade I remember we went on a field trip to a place with a computer.  They tried to teach us how they used stacks and stacks of these punch cards sorted in a very precise order to program the machines.

 

 

 

Then when I was in junior high they had machines that ran programs from cassette tapes.  Atari was da bomb!

post #6 of 29
I worked at Apple in the early 80s. Even the Mac first came only with one floppy drive. You really needed an external drive to make any way with it. Hard drives came about later.

"They had to go to the library."

"Who'd want to do that?"

ROFL
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

When I was in second grade I remember we went on a field trip to a place with a computer.  They tried to teach us how they used stacks and stacks of these punch cards sorted in a very precise order to program the machines.





Then when I was in junior high they had machines that ran programs from cassette tapes.  Atari was da bomb!
I think punch cards had been almost entirely replaced by tapes by the time I tried some kind of programming class in college and was required to use them for a few assignments, probably just for the purpose of learning how a computer 'thought'--or maybe to make us appreciate the new technology that made them obsolete. They were kind of fun, though.
post #8 of 29

I remember in about 8th grade we used to go in to Radio Shack at the mall when they were busy and head over to the DOS machines and do this:

 

10:Print Eat Me

20: Goto 10

Enter......................

 

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me

Eat Me.........................................

post #9 of 29
My first computer was a KIM with 1k of memory. I manually built the memory up to 2k on a add on board. Programing was machine language.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

My first computer was a KIM with 1k of memory. I manually built the memory up to 2k on a add on board. Programing was machine language.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1
You win the Internet!
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

I worked at Apple in the early 80s. Even the Mac first came only with one floppy drive. You really needed an external drive to make any way with it. Hard drives came about later.

"They had to go to the library."

"Who'd want to do that?"

ROFL

 

That was my first Mac -- 512k and a single floppy drive, 1986.  Each disk had to contain OS, program, and files.  When the 512 died, I replaced it with a Mac Plus with a whole megabyte, and maybe two floppy drive slots.  I didn't own a hard drive until grad school: 20 mb., $150.

post #12 of 29

Those were OG floppies too, not the 3.5" diskettes on the right, correct?

 

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Those were OG floppies too, not the 3.5" diskettes on the right, correct?

 

 

 

If you're asking me, no, all Macs (but not earlier Apples) had that sophisticated 3.5" diskette on the right -- 800k at first.  The drive itself lay behind a single slot in the body of the machine, no ejection button as in the photo (I don't believe that's a Mac drive).  To eject, you dragged the disk image to the trash.  If that didn't work (which occasionally it didn't), there was a little hole next to the drive into which you could insert a straightened paperclip.  Oh my, oh my.

post #14 of 29

I want to say it was mid 80s, perhaps 85 before I saw the 3.5" floppy.  This Wiki says Apple had it in 84.

post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 
To eject, you dragged the disk image to the trash.  If that didn't work (which occasionally it didn't), there was a little hole next to the drive into which you could insert a straightened paperclip.  Oh my, oh my.

I have wished that my MacMini had that feature for CDs a couple of times.

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post


You win the Internet!

To add storage was a cassette recorder, yes the ones you played music from, location of program or file was based on tone and writing down what you had saved.

 

:eek :D.

 

Thinking back, that was the state of the art back then.

post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Those were OG floppies too, not the 3.5" diskettes on the right, correct?

 

8",  5" and 3.5"  The good thing about 8 and 5 inch floppies was if you knew were to cut and punch holes you had a double sided floppy for the price of a single sided floppy I was in high school back then.

 

The things you make me remember :rolleyes .

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 
Those were OG floppies too, not the 3.5" diskettes on the right, correct?


8",  5" and 3.5"  The good thing about 8 and 5 inch floppies was if you knew were to cut and punch holes you had a double sided floppy for the price of a single sided floppy I was in high school back then.

The things you make me remember rolleyes.gif  .
5" disks for me, I think. Didn't we call them diskettes? I remember punching holes--and thinking I was totally cool!
post #19 of 29

I still have an 8" floppy somewhere.  It has my thesis on it.  Thank goodness I printed a copy before storing it, though I can't say I've read it since I printed it.

 

That's how I got into computers.  I started the project on a yellow legal pad and got three pages in when I realized I ought to get hold of one of those new-fangled computers.  I borrowed a Commodore 64 and was blown away at how easy it was to write and edit.  I never looked back.

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post


5" disks for me, I think. Didn't we call them diskettes? I remember punching holes--and thinking I was totally cool!

 

It was cool until you slipped and didn't pay attention and put a hole in the disk itself. Doh!

post #21 of 29

Apple ][s, //s, //es, //cs and ///s had 5.25" diskettes. The Mac definitely had the 3.5". Lisas had 5.25" diskettes as well, IIRC. Boy that was a long time ago. At least 4 lifetimes ago.

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

8",  5" and 3.5"  The good thing about 8 and 5 inch floppies was if you knew were to cut and punch holes you had a double sided floppy for the price of a single sided floppy I was in high school back then.

 

The things you make me remember :rolleyes .

 

 

8" Floppy for the PDP-8 in University. We weren't allowed as undergrads to use the PDP-11.

post #23 of 29

When I started my CS degree, we were using punch cards and an IBM 360, I believe. By the time I graduated, we had gone through paper terminals and then some CRT terminals. I had to create a PASCAL compiler in AL, all with cards. What joy.

post #24 of 29

After the KIM it was a WANG 2000 (no joke) at high school, we wrote basic to simulate machine code.   GIO statements, jumping in and out of loops, and so on.

 

Later we got a TRS80 and we hardwired the 2 together and wrote the code on the WANG to understand and speak to the TRS80.  It was amazing what you could do with the GIO codes.

 

BTW  GIO stands for General In Out and with them you could address and define each pin and how it sees and sends each bit.

post #25 of 29

My daughter (12 years old) recently asked me for an assignment what the biggest change  I seen in my life time.

 

My answer.....the size of computers and the power that they have (and the fact that we use them for playing games).

post #26 of 29

I remember my first boss staring at a new Apple ][+ and shaking his head.  He was the manager for a small statistical programming group that was still using punched cards along with terminals with phone line connections at the time.  When we asked what he was thinking, he said he was blown away by the fact that such a little machine, with 16K of RAM, had more memory than the huge IBM mainframe he first worked with.

 

I knew things were changing fast when I was interviewing a young woman fresh out of college for a programming job in the late 1980s and said something like "before microcomputers."  The look on her face made it clear she couldn't imagine a world without a microcomputer.

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

I still have an 8" floppy somewhere.  It has my thesis on it.  Thank goodness I printed a copy before storing it, though I can't say I've read it since I printed it.

 

 

 

We got one of the early Sony Mavica digital cameras.  I had hundreds and hundreds of photos still saved on dozens and dozens of 3.5" disks as machines started coming without 3.5" drives for them.  It took me almost as long to move them all to a hard drive as it did for me to rip all my CDs and vinyl to MP3 files.

post #28 of 29

The equivalent of Call of Duty in the 1980's:

 

"West of House
You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door.
There is a small mailbox here."

 

All text, no graphics, no sound.

 

http://thcnet.net/zork/

post #29 of 29

iPhone prototype from 2001...

 

 

The only things certain about technology are that the state-of-the-art stuff becomes obsolete and starts looking remarkably primitive in a relatively short amount of time, and in general we are not so great when it comes to predicting the future of it.

 

Which makes the actual film 2001 that much more remarkable - it still holds up pretty damn well. RIP, SK.

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