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Best ski car that you have owned? - Page 5

post #121 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 
I'm more concerned about  handling and stopping performance on the roads I drive on 98% of the time than I am the 2%...

Except that snow tires are manageable 100% of the time, and the 2% when your all seasons are worthless is a powder day.  When I was driving to work, I was happy to have snow tires maybe 3 or 5 days a year.  Now it's one powder day every 2 or 3 years.  And it's still worth it.

It doesn't even cost that much. AWD adds $1000 + to the cost of a new car, and takes about 1 MPG all year long.  I never spent that much on snow tires, and I was gonna have to buy tires anyway.  

 

BK 


Edited by Bode Klammer - 10/12/15 at 8:52am
post #122 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmeb View Post

All this talk of snow tires, and committing to a SW CO trip that will take me over some likely-gnarly roads has got me thinking about adding a set to my AWD van. It has very good condition All-Seasons on it now that got through I70 last winter. But the extra comfort over Red Mountain Pass etc seems like it may be worth it.

Anyone have thoughts on the following few tires I've found in quick searches for a reasonable price:

- Firestone Winterforce UV @ $74.50/tire
- Hankook Winter I*Pike RS @ $86/tire
- Cooper Weather Master S/T 2 @ $84/tire. 

Could probably also finangle a family-discount via Dealer Tire if there are others very much worth considering.

Thinking I'd go un-studded as most of the drive time will be on dryish highways if that makes a difference. 

EDIT: Or maybe the solution is to just grab some chains for the really crazy days. 

I have run both the iPike and WM S/T2. If studless, the iPike for sure. I ran the S/T2 studded and it did very well. I think people make way too big of a deal about studs on dry pavement. On my minivan, nothing but a reassuring click at low speeds. Both make good summer tires once worn past good winter usage.

I get people wanting more performance on sports coupes and sports wagons, but you get so much more out of a studded tire that on a non-performance vehicle I think you lose a major advantage of going with a winter tire.

I wouldn't want to be on Red Mountain Pass trying to chain up. Tires for sure...
post #123 of 136

Consumer reports ranks them:

- Cooper (pretty high)

- Hankook (mid pack)

- Firestone (last)

 

None are recommended, though.   Michelin, Nokian, Bridgestone and Continental are the snow tires recommended by CR.

post #124 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post

Consumer reports ranks them:
- Cooper (pretty high)
- Hankook (mid pack)
- Firestone (last)

None are recommended, though.   Michelin, Nokian, Bridgestone and Continental are the snow tires recommended by CR.

That Cooper is probably the newer WSC. The S/T2 is their previous gen tire they have continued to make perhaps as the studdable option. I bought it because I could tell from the design that it was a snow tire instead of ice tire, and I studded for ice. Worked out well, in the sense at least that my wife would drive it.

I would stud any of those three tires - if going studless, you really need to buy at the top end of ratings, because the lower end are pretty mediocre.
post #125 of 136

Back before I was married I had 2 studded snow tires on my RWD cars. I kept the summer tires on the front. That was how we did it in those days. With studded tires my Chevelle would creep up a 7% grade on wet ice at 10-15 mph with the engine idling. With non-studded tires of any kind it spun the wheels on flat ice with the engine idling. I kept the off-season tires in the trunk, because I otherwise had little need for the trunk, anyway. Now that I'm married and driving FWD cars with all-seasons, I need the trunk all the time, it seems, and I don't really have any space to store 8 off-season tires. (And trunks don't hold 4 tires any more.)  I plan all my ski trips so that I can avoid conditions that my car and tires can't handle. If I still had the Chevelle, I'd still have to run 2 studded snows on the back and all-seasons on the front and I'd probably be able to find a place to squirrel away two off season tires.

 

I owned the Jimmy and the Chevelle concurrently for about two years. The Jimmy had off-road tires on it. I used it for skiing when I anticipated deep snow and the Chevelle when the roads were clear. The off-road tires with the 4WD worked fine under any conditions I encountered.

post #126 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Consumer reports ranks them:

- Cooper (pretty high)

- Hankook (mid pack)

- Firestone (last)

 

None are recommended, though.   Michelin, Nokian, Bridgestone and Continental are the snow tires recommended by CR.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post


That Cooper is probably the newer WSC. The S/T2 is their previous gen tire they have continued to make perhaps as the studdable option. I bought it because I could tell from the design that it was a snow tire instead of ice tire, and I studded for ice. Worked out well, in the sense at least that my wife would drive it.

I would stud any of those three tires - if going studless, you really need to buy at the top end of ratings, because the lower end are pretty mediocre.

 

Thanks for the tips / CR report all. I assume that studding isn't very favorable to mpg which is already pretty darn low in the van. 

 

Unfortunately I'm having a hard time locating Michelin/Nokian/Bridgestones in my size 215/70-15.


Edited by jmeb - 10/12/15 at 10:58am
post #127 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post
 

Except that snow tires are manageable 100% of the time, and the 2% when your all seasons are worthless is a powder day. 

 

Disagree,  I've made several epic powder days without even needing to chain up... which has always been an available option.  Last one most of the resort staff wasn't able to make it when I was there first chair,,  No liftees at all, just a ski patrol watching the lift stop button and self service loading for two hours LOL! 

 

When a ladder falls off a work truck right in front of me in traffic on a 90 degree day in the pouring rain I'm glad I have the right shoes on 98% of the time. I'll give that EXTRA extra room the other 2% of the time and chain up if that doesn't feel like enough.

 

Moral of the story, get the most optimal set up for where you drive the most just like choosing a one ski quiver.  I'm not going to drive my fat skis around town all summer long or even all winter long when winter where I live is 50s with little snow.

post #128 of 136
I didn't notice any mpg change from studding, but the tires seemed to last longer. If you don't have a truck and can't run a good off-road traction tire, then I think that studs are by far the most cost effective and otherwise neutral to other considerations winter performance upgrade.

It's one if those FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) things that once you do it you may feel silly for having worried about it - I did. Now it does add up front cost, but the peace of mind over studless tires on ice (which mostly suck) is huge.

Lots of people say the Michelin X-ice is very good, and I believe them, but on a heavy van on steeper grades, it's studs all the way. You may notice that nobody tests winter tires uphill. It's always flat surface acceleration. And what a tire does on a flat surface may, unfortunately, not correlate well to say hairpin switchbacks on a 7% grade. That's why off-road tires are so superior. They are designed to climb (and descend), and usually have far softer compounds than dedicated winter tires.

I will go ahead and post this here now that we are descending into tire wars. First up, 2007 Nissan Quest with traction control, FWD, Cooper Wintermaster S/T2 studded. Second up, 1995 Land Cruiser, 37" Interco Trxus MT (baby Swampers), AWD (viscous coupler), but basically RWD for the purposes of what you see here except when I hammer the throttle. At 1:15 I lock the center diff and hammer it and then slam on the brakes (ABS is off now). No reason to drive that way, but you can see the level of traction.

Now this is a difficult surface - powder falling at near freezing temps, packing, and then temps drop to low teens, so the ice is 'dry' with a little powder on top. But at a 3% grade, the studless Hankooks and Hakka Q's have been completely defeated in these conditions (I almost got t-boned in the Hakkas when they suddenly let go at an intersection at very low speeds). Studs give it a fighting chance, but that wouldn't make it up Berthoud in a shoulder season cluster when the pass gets really icy.

Somebody else will get stuck before I do in the van unless I am out alone in more Cruiser suitable conditions, but I sure would hate to be on a pass with exposure with my car doing what that Quest is doing on a neighborhood road.
post #129 of 136

jmeb

Of those three the Firestone is really good for traction and your dentist will love you.

Believe me, Hakkas are worth the extra that you pay. I usually get over two seasons on a set. I have to get new ones half way through the third season usually.

I drive 300 miles per weekend plus training 4 nights a week. That is usually over 10,000 miles each season.

post #130 of 136

What is that AWD van? I'll check to see what will work on it in a Hakka.

post #131 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ View Post
 

What is that AWD van? I'll check to see what will work on it in a Hakka.

 

2001 Chevy Astro  (standard 15" wheels). 

 

Luckily I put way fewer miles on the van every winter. ~110 mi once a week (carpool the other days), and planning two ~1000mi trips this winter. 

post #132 of 136

Nokian makes that one in a Nordman 5. My dealer cost is under $100

You might be able to find it for under $100. I'd sell it for about that plus mounting and balancing.

post #133 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ View Post
 

Nokian makes that one in a Nordman 5. My dealer cost is under $100

You might be able to find it for under $100. I'd sell it for about that plus mounting and balancing.

 

Super helpful. Going to ask around for it. I'd come to you, but as much as I love Spotted Cow it's a heck of a drive. 

post #134 of 136
post #135 of 136

Well that didn't work.

I had a map of all the dealers within 100 miles of Denver.

Put your location into that link and the dealers will come up.

Good luck.

How'd you find out about Spotted Cow way out there? They only sell it in "Dairy Air".

Not my favorite. I like Staghorn Octoberfest and Cabin Fever Honey Bock. "Cow" tastes like the part of the cow it resembles. ;)

post #136 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ View Post
 

Well that didn't work.

I had a map of all the dealers within 100 miles of Denver.

Put your location into that link and the dealers will come up.

Good luck.

How'd you find out about Spotted Cow way out there? They only sell it in "Dairy Air".

Not my favorite. I like Staghorn Octoberfest and Cabin Fever Honey Bock. "Cow" tastes like the part of the cow it resembles. ;)

 

Thanks.

 

I know spotted cow and other Glarus brews from my time in the midwest. I even bought my father a few pints after he finished his first-ever bike tour with me around those parts. 

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