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Define Directional Freeride

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I find these two terms related to describing a ski confusing. FREERIDE and DIRECTIONAL. I've never really understood what a FREERIDE ski is designed for. I think I understand PARK, CARVER, ALL MOUNTAIN, BIG MOUNTAIN, BACKCUNTRY and POWDER but what the heck is FREERIDE? Related questioin-  what does DIRECTIONAL mean when related to a ski? Aren't all skis directional? If there are DIRECTIONAL skis there must also be NON-DIRECTIONAL skis. What is an example of a ski that is not a DIRECTIONAL ski?

post #2 of 8

These is a big grey area, some companies will sell skis like big twin tip, heavily rockered skis and call it freeride, others will literally call a ski freeride (http://www.praxisskis.com/products/2015-freeride.html) and it will be a more directional ski.

 

looking at the same company

 

directional/non-directional automatic/bent chetler, quest lab/rocker2 108, cochice/peacemaker

 

I understand by directional a ski with more tip than tail rocker, sometimes no tail rocker at all or a small rise, and a non-directional ski more like a big tip/tail rocker or more symmetric ski 

post #3 of 8

Freeride means an off-piste and powder-oriented all mountain ski. Fairly synonymous with Big Mountain--most of which never get anywhere near a big mountain, although maybe a broader category--I think of big mountain skis as being on the stiff, long radius side. Directional means a ski designed to ski forward, non directional is designed so it can be skied backwards. Seems pretty clear. Don't get hung up on the freeride thing. Terms like freeride, big mountain, all mountain, etc are useful ways of sorting skis on a manufacturer's website, to make it easier to narrow down the choices to what you're looking for. 

post #4 of 8

My powder skis are Rossi Sickles.  They were marketed as "backcountry freestyle jib" skis.  I love the skis, but I don't do backcountry or even know what jib means :dunno.  It's all marketing.  Demo and find a ski that works for you in spite of how it's marketed (or its topsheet).

post #5 of 8

Dimension examples:

Directional: 118/98/108

Symmetric: 118/98/118

 

Directional is designed to ski..basically..forward. Symmetric, is designed to ski regular or switch equally. As far as the rocker profiles and how they use the term "Directional Freeride" gets into the marketing aspect on how that company wants to differentiate themselves from the pack. 

post #6 of 8
Some so called freeride skis, e.g. the Rocker2 108, are typically mounted in a -3/-4 from center, or +3/+4 from a traditional mount. So forward, but not center mounted like you might have for a pure park ski. These "mid-mount" designs seem to be evolving to retain as much directional capability as possible with a playful DNA (although enter the Powertrac89 to muddy the waters on from which side the DNA lies?). Anyway, at least IMHO, the target audience is quite a bit wider than folks who can actually do real tricks or who will spend any time in the park.

@tball...your jib skis apparently mean you'd ought to be doing some tricks off of natural features smile.gif. I have a far more mundane view that the idea is finding stuff to play around on (that's different than finesse vs. charger) but you can get on 'em, to a limit, when you want to.

Freestyle line shoppers, if you will biggrin.gif.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

My powder skis are Rossi Sickles.  They were marketed as "backcountry freestyle jib" skis.  I love the skis, but I don't do backcountry or even know what jib means :dunno.  It's all marketing.  Demo and find a ski that works for you in spite of how it's marketed (or its topsheet).

backcountry=light weight (you know, for skinning). Jib means tricks, in other words twin tipped. It's not that complicated.

 

BTW Freestyle means doing tricks. Freeride means what I said above. Easy to confuse the two.

post #8 of 8

Thanks all.  I guess I do a little jibbing here and there, but since my eyes are in the front of my head I won't be taking advantage of their switch capabilities :)  They came with mounting points marked at +4, 0 and -2.   I mounted them -2 since I don't ski switch and wanted the extra tip length for powder.  Point being, you can really change the characteristics of skis like this depending on the mount point, as @NayBreak suggested above.

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