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Slo Mo - inspiring video

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

post #2 of 25

I like it.

post #3 of 25

I like it.

post #4 of 25
To say that I like it is not enough. as a skating instructor....I find it awesome and very inspiring. The downside is...well, I'll never be able to "cash in and do things I love"...
Edited by Nobody - 5/9/14 at 11:09am
post #5 of 25

This film leaves me conflicted.
On the one hand, I respect this man for his willingness to jump off the treadmill and into a pair of skates. No one could question, after looking at his face, the amount of joy that percolates up as he glides so effortlessly along the boardwalk.

That being said, what would the world be like if everyone just gave up on everything and just did what they liked. This man has skills in two medical specialties. Society has rewarded him handsomely with both status and the kind of treasure it likely takes to "do what you want" in southern California. He has the capacity to heal. There is no greater good.
To my mind, a life is best lived in a harmonious balance between doing what we want and what we can to contribute to our place on earth.

This man has not achieved that elevated stasis. Rather, he has moved from one unhappy extreme to what may ultimately prove to be another unhappy extreme. 

Frankly, I would hope one day that his blades should lead him unexpectedly to a medical clinic for the indigent. At the end of that day he may feel a sense of satisfaction that he once felt as a young physician and healer. Then he will smile inside and out.

D1

post #6 of 25

He's going blind.  That was the precipitating event for his stopping his practice.  

At least that's what I got from the video.  Quote from video:

"So I was thinking if I’m going blind, losing my vision and it’s affecting my work, and my work is very unsatisfactory to start with…why don’t I just cash it in and start a whole new life."

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 

Exactly, he said he was misreading xrays and couldn't recognize faces.  Not sure that it was a physical problem in his eyes or a brain condition, but he couldn't practice anymore.

post #8 of 25

This came along at the right moment in my week, as I struggle in my own life with doubts and disappointments of many colors. Yes, there are very real questions about the seriousness of "first world problems" - or even, in this case, "1% problems" - that arise from this video. (He has plenty of money and can live in California where he can skate every day in comfort and not have to worry about where his next meal is coming from.) I think it's possible to them put aside temporarily and talk about the kernel that speaks to us. I don't think SMJ is one of the one percent, but clearly it speaks to him, right? I'm certainly not in the one percent and it speaks to me. The kernel is, essentially, that love is infectious, and that you can't spread that germ around unless you're infected yourself. So you'd better be doing something you love, or you are not spreading. And if you are not spreading, you are not helping.

 

And yes, @deliberate1, I get what you're saying and part of me agrees. Meanwhile, do note that this is you all over, dude, even though you're still putting in the billable hours. You are wise like this guy.

 

Couple of quotes from the film:

 

"There an aspect to lateral acceleration that makes many of us feel good."  [Hear that, Bears?]

 

"I'm trying to get to the end of my life without becoming an asshole again."

post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 

I'm with you qc.  even if one doesn't go all the way and give up their lives to skate every day - I can relate to the emotional power of movement through space, as can all of us.  He just brings it to another level.  Talk about one foot skiing!

post #10 of 25

"Do what you want" said Lionel Dahmer to his son Geoffry...

 

Some lives are lived in the extreme, your experience may vary.

 

"Do what you want" sounds pretty good for me at this moment - in my twenties it would have been a disaster. I needed to do a lot of things that I didn't want to do and now I'm better for it.

post #11 of 25

Though I love the idea of being able to "do what I want", if everyone did that, most of us wouldn't be able to do what we want.  This includes Slomo, unless we are assuming that somebody wants to make Studio apartments, roller blades and everything else that we all need so we can do what we want.

 

The trick is finding the balance.  I spend somewhere around 60 or 70 hours a week doing what I don't want, thinking about it or getting ready to do it, so my family and I can spend some time doing what we want.  I don't really want to work out but if I don't, I don't get to do what I want and I definitely won't be able to do it for as long.  So, I work out.  I don't want to get up at 0430 every morning so I have enough time to do that before work, but I do anyways.  I'm quite sure I don't want to drive 40 minutes to the place I now refer to as "The Pit of Despair" but I do because we actually do good things for this country's national defense, and I like being able to pay my mortgage and buy nice things for my wife and kids.  I also get to buy nice things for me, like skis.  With those, I can then go do the things I like.  To buy them, someone in Slovenia has to make them, whether they want to or not.

 

How many of us became instructors so we had easier access to what we really want - skiing - and did the instructor things as a means to get it.  Some of us along the way found out that we really like instructing and coaching and it became what we want; just didn't know it yet.

 

Our existence is based on a barter system of being willing to do what you don't want so you can do what you do want.  The fortunate find things that they really like doing, maybe even love doing and do that to get them what they want.  The exceptionally fortunate that are doing that are actually doing what they want.

 

I've always been a believer in "Everyone contributes."  In my house, even the dog has a job.

 

The problem is when doing what we don't want completely replaces what we do want and you loose sight of what you were doing it for anyway.

 

JMO,

Ken

post #12 of 25

Darn it!  If only I had built up a thriving medical profession in neurology and psychology working at several hospitals, I too could have retired at 40 and done what I want to for the next 53 years.

post #13 of 25

I get it. L&AirC, Ghost, I don't disagree with you. There is grunt work to be done, for sure. Jesus was a carpenter. He had deadlines to meet, I suppose. Had to put gas in the pickup every week. To me the useful message in the video is a simple-to-grasp but hard to heed one that all the great spiritual leaders teach, which is that we need to STOP every day, and re-link with the things and the people that embody love and truth and beauty for us, without regard to how or whether that stopping or those things or those people advance progress on our to-do lists. To do anything less is to turn away from blessing, which ultimately is a hurtful thing to do.

 


 

Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin.

(Matthew 6:28)

 


 
The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours
(Wordsworth)
 
 

 

Now pretend you are 11 again and are at summer camp. It's after dinner, and a hundred fireflies were winking at you as you walked through the tall grass down to the campfire. Sing along with this superficially childish song that turns out not only to be moving but also very much on topic here. (NOTE: the one performance of this song that is a must-listen is Gordon Bok's original track on the Seal Djiril's Hymn album, available on Spotify here and from Amazon here.)
 
 
Brandy Tree (Otter's Song)

(E) Am Em / Em Am Em / F Em / Am G Am

I go down to the brandy tree
Take my nose and my tail with me,
All for the world and the wind to see
And never come back no more.

Down in the meadowmarsh, deep and wide,
Tumble the tangle by my side,
All for the westing wind to run
And slide in the summer rain.

     C G7 G / C G7 G / Am Em / Am G Am

     Sun, come follow my happy way;
     Wind, come walk beside me.
     Moon on the mountain, go with me:
     A wondrous way I know.

I go down to the windy sea
And the little grey seal will play with me;
Slide on the rock and dive in the bay
And sleep on the ledge at night.

     But the seal don't try to tell me
     How to fish in the windy blue:
     Seals been fishing for a thousand years,
     And he knows that I have too.

When the frog goes down to the mud to sleep
And the lamprey hide in the boulders deep,
I take my nose and my tail and go
A hundred thousand hills.

Someday, down by the brandy tree,
I'll hear the Shepherd call for me;
Call me to leave my happy ways
And the shining world I know.

     Sun on the hill, come go with me,
     My days have all been free.
     The pipes come laughing down the wind
     And that's the way I go, That's the way for me.







Words and music by Gordon Bok.
Recorded on "Seal Djiril's Hymn," FSI-48
     "I learned this song from a small otter on Sherman's Point,
Knox County, State of Maine, on a cold morning in 1966.  Thinking
it over, I wrote the refrain myself.  A thousand years (I was
told) is a long time for an otter.  So should it be for us."
post #14 of 25

Just keep carving, skating, following the line and it is all good, be it at your work or your play.

post #15 of 25
 

 

Now pretend you are 11 again and are at summer camp. It's after dinner, and a hundred fireflies were winking at you as you walked through the tall grass down to the campfire. 

 

A lovely image, my friend. Indeed, if you can reconnect with the exuberant part of you that remains forever a child and can tap into that magical wonder, you need never worrying about losing your soul. It was a joy when the 11 year old in me got to hang out in the trees and bumps with the 11 year old part of you that always comes out to play in the cold. But nary a firefly in sight.

Perhaps, ultimately, that is what this fellow lost and is attempting to recover by leaving his old path behind and striking out on a new one traveled on skates. No one, least of all me, would fault him for seeking his bliss. We are all on that journey, each in our own way. But, skating, and only skating, the same path day after day, is a constricted journey. He has found joy. That much is clear and is a blessing for him. But the joy he possesses lays only along that solitary way and is dependent on a pair of skates. I wonder if he senses the treasures that are waiting for him just beyond the reach of his blades.

Indeed, when I see him coasting through life still struggling for balance, now precariously on one foot, I am reminded of that story I learned in Hebrew school 

on a day I did not skip to go skiing.

The scene reveals a pagan who challenged the rabbis to teach him the entire Torah (aka 5 books of Moses, aka The Bible) while standing on one foot. One of the greatest of the rabbis in my tradition, the inimitable Hillel, assumed the Slo Mo pose and replied “That which is despicable to you, do not do to others. This is the whole Torah. The rest is commentary. Go and learn it.” The Golden Rule traces back to this sage who lived in the 1st century BC. Over time, it has been reinterpreted in a way that Hillel would have appreciated; that we should treat others as we would have them treat us. And doing for others is what do when we are at our very best. I think Hillel would have agreed with that as well, since he also cautioned, 

"If I am not for me, who will be. But if I am only for myself, what am I. And if not now, when." 

Now that Slo Mo appears to have accomplished the first and last admonitions, perhaps he will find his way to the third, and ultimate dimension of joy.

In the meantime, Slo Mo, blade on.

D1

post #16 of 25

Well I'm not sure how this is going to be taken.    This going weekend in Maine there will be 5 followers (monk and nuns) of Thich Nhat Hanh a Zen Master.   Thich Nhat Hanh  is the Vietnamese Buddhist Monk that came to the States during the Vietnam war to promote the Peace Movement.  He has created a Spritual pactice of Mindfulness.    This Saturday in Augusta there will be a Day of Mindfulness Retreat and then on Sunday in Freeport they will be doing a free Walking Meditation all are welcome all Sunday.  Saturday there will be a charge ( not sure how much and if there is room)   I will be get more information soon.  My son is one of the Monks that will be there. If interested PM me

 

I feel that SLOMO has tap into this energy via his slow and forward direction.  I wish I had his balance.

 

Hank 

post #17 of 25

If I were to follow an established religion it would be Buddhism. And Western Maine sounds like an ideal place to get my Buddha groove on. I also wish the entire world's population would just chill the fuck out and have a Day of Mindfulness.

 

I too wish I had Slomo's balance - I suck at roller blading but I'm going to get that independent foot movement one way or the other!

post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildcat hank View Post
 

Well I'm not sure how this is going to be taken.    This going weekend in Maine there will be 5 followers (monk and nuns) of Thich Nhat Hanh a Zen Master.   Thich Nhat Hanh  is the Vietnamese Buddhist Monk that came to the States during the Vietnam war to promote the Peace Movement.  He has created a Spritual pactice of Mindfulness.    This Saturday in Augusta there will be a Day of Mindfulness Retreat and then on Sunday in Freeport they will be doing a free Walking Meditation all are welcome all Sunday.  Saturday there will be a charge ( not sure how much and if there is room)   I will be get more information soon.  My son is one of the Monks that will be there. If interested PM me

 

I feel that SLOMO has tap into this energy via his slow and forward direction.  I wish I had his balance.

 

Hank 

 

Taken with appreciation on my part!

 

I too would be a Tibetan Buddhist if I had the patience and discipline to be anything but who I am!

 

"Mindfullness" is a powerful concept.  I try to use it in my eating.  Think about what I'm eating, not just eat mindlessly.

 

So wildcat are you and your son in a race to see who gets to enlightenment first?  lol.

 

Seriously though having a son on that path must be amazing.  The only Monk I ever met was Thelonius Monk.

post #19 of 25

It is great having son on this path now.  It saved his life.

 

Mindful eating is good.   They will have meals where you don't talk the whole time until your dishes have been washed.

 

So mindful skiing and roller blading is great thing to work at.  I think SLOMO is very focused on his breathing.  That is what we all need to do.  When we are suffering remember to come back to our breath.  Same in skiing when we are out of sink ( bad run) instead of getting into our heads just focus on our breathing .

 

Hank 

 

PS my son name is Troi Hien Tai translation is True sky of the Presence Moment   or for short we call him Brother Now.

post #20 of 25
Edit: not the same guy,
Edited by WC68 - 5/13/14 at 4:28am
post #21 of 25

Wow, that's pretty far out there.   Rationality may be limiting, but it's the best model we've got, and he appears to have forsaken it.  ( I can put it down when I want to, but I use it when it serves me).

 

Why would they need to resort to some elaborate means of puttin semen and blood into EVERYBODY'S food (not a very feasible plan, even if it were to have the desired effect, which is another zillion light years beyond the probable), when they could just control the mass media through six or seven corporations for the same effect?  ;) 

 

Maybe the target audience of that "article" is more likely to believe the former theory; a lot of homeless people are paranoid schizophrenics.

post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Slomo is a bit stranger than he seems...

http://www.nz9f.com/gnosis

 

Why do you think that's the same guy?  Yes it's the same name and the San Diego connection, but could it just be another John Kitchin?

post #23 of 25
I think you're right SkiMango...

I was reading another article about Slomo. One of the replies to the article had that website. After (a little) Further research on my part, I don't think they are the same.

My apologies to Slomo
post #24 of 25

It's nice to see that The Bilderberg's have women at top level positions now - you have to stay with the times you know!

post #25 of 25

Couldn't be the same guy.  SLOMO's equanimity is visible.

 

Whoever put up that website is thinking he's seeing the truth that everyone else is missing, that there are conspiracies to conceal the truth and to spread hurt everywhere.  He's shouting with that website that bad guys are everywhere and he knows all about it while the world does not.  This guy is agitated.

 

This skater is calm.

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