or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Proper Boot Flex

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I recently bought my first pair of boots(after 20 years of renting) and have 8 days on them so far. They are Full Tilts that came with the #6 tongue, and after a couple tweaks and custom footbeds, they fit perfectly. My question is, how can I tell if the #6 flex is right for me. Being new to good boots, I don't really know how to tell. When I was shopping for boots the fitter mentioned getting stiffer tongues down the road if I needed them, but didn't say how I would know. I would ask him, but he is 700 miles away and my season is over. One of the boots he had me try was a Lange RX 130 LV that he thought would be too stiff, but after flexing in it he said I flexed it just fine. After some internet searching, the guesses on Full Tilt #6 flex equivalency are anywhere from 60 to 100. That makes me think I could possibly up my stiffness to an 8 or 10, but not sure. I am 6 foot, 190, aggressive and fast skier, skiing groomed, trees, and bowls. Any input or advice would be great!
post #2 of 18
After attending about 10 race camps over the years one thing that was really drilled into us was always that we need to be able to flex our boots. I see so many women and men skiing who cannot flex their boots and will never learn to ski properly. I have been on a race boot with a flex of 130 just to get the proper fit for my foot. One problem I had was I always had to give a little extra push to the right ski if I was going slow. Also when I was going slow I felt I really had to work the boot to get it to flex. I had the shop cut the back of the boot out which is one way that they change the flexibility and I really like the boots much better. Then I removed the screws out of the back and I liked it even better. I decided to go one more step in I had a booster racing strapp installed on the boots and I cut one of the pieces giving me even more flex. To me the result was I ski better. I can make this ski turn quicker without as much work and I feel better balanced. I think the bottom line is you can do some things to soften up or make a boot stiffer and see if you like them better on the snow and that's going to give you the best indication of what's best for you.
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post

I recently bought my first pair of boots(after 20 years of renting) and have 8 days on them so far. They are Full Tilts that came with the #6 tongue, and after a couple tweaks and custom footbeds, they fit perfectly. My question is, how can I tell if the #6 flex is right for me. Being new to good boots, I don't really know how to tell. When I was shopping for boots the fitter mentioned getting stiffer tongues down the road if I needed them, but didn't say how I would know. I would ask him, but he is 700 miles away and my season is over. One of the boots he had me try was a Lange RX 130 LV that he thought would be too stiff, but after flexing in it he said I flexed it just fine. After some internet searching, the guesses on Full Tilt #6 flex equivalency are anywhere from 60 to 100. That makes me think I could possibly up my stiffness to an 8 or 10, but not sure. I am 6 foot, 190, aggressive and fast skier, skiing groomed, trees, and bowls. Any input or advice would be great!
I would get that stiffer tongue and try it on the snow in then you'll know. I think it's hard to tell in the shop sometimes so many different plastics on how they're going to react out in the cold
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post

I recently bought my first pair of boots(after 20 years of renting) and have 8 days on them so far. They are Full Tilts that came with the #6 tongue, and after a couple tweaks and custom footbeds, they fit perfectly. My question is, how can I tell if the #6 flex is right for me.

I wouldn't worry much about flex rating. Are you out skiing the boot, losing stability and/or responsiveness because it is over flexing? It seems like you are happy right now.

The straight answer of course is to try the other tongue(s). It's just one of those seat of the wallet things where you get to pay to play - otherwise you might not know smile.gif.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
I think I may just get a stiffer tongue and give it a shot. All I really have to lose is a few minutes and a few bucks. If I like it better, great. If not, hello eBay!
post #6 of 18

Stiffness is more a question of what type of skiing that you do. Racing and high performance go stiff, park and trick skiing go soft and anything else somewhere between. 

 

Stiffness also depends on your ability, the better you are the stiffer you can go (stiff boots are not forgiving on mistakes in input).  Skis will also play a factor (beginner skis will be over driven with stiff boots and race skis won't react well  to input from soft boots).

 

The real question is do the skis respond crisply and do what you want?  If so don't mess with it.  If not, than start tweaking.  Going stiffer is harder (if not impossible) than going softer.

 

Me I prefer a stiff boot and am currently skiing Lange WC130's,  these are the softest boot that I've skied in years.  They fit well (most important) and all my skis respond exactly as I want and expect, so they're great.  I used to ski something in the 150-160 range when I weight 130lbs wet and now I weight 170.  I'd still hop into something stiffer without worries, but nothing softer.

 

Typo correction


Edited by oldschoolskier - 5/9/14 at 8:22pm
post #7 of 18

Then there is the temperature thing.

When it is really cold almost all boots are really stiff.

In spring slush you can practically telemark with 60-80 flex boots.

I have two pair of the same Atomic shells, one 90 and the other 120.

Below zero I can't tell them apart.

At reasonable temperatures I always ski the 120's because I like to be able to pressure my tips.

 

Real race boots are different.

The whir of hair dryers as folks heat their boots enough that they can get them on is a pretty good clue that your are around the race crowd.

Panicked is a racer who can't find his dryer and can't get his cold plug boots off when he is freezing and has to pee.

post #8 of 18

Off is easy.  I can always sleep with the boots until they warm up enough to get off, but putting them on.....

 

During the 2012/13 season I skied during for a few hours during the day and left the boots and skis in the car for a few hours and went out again during the evening.  It was -20C so it took me 30 minutes to get into my boots even after 10 minutes under the hand dryer in the washroom.   Rooky mistake :nono:, I should know better.  Nearly broke my feet trying to get into the boots.

 

Make note always keep boots warm before putting them on to go skiing. :D

post #9 of 18
I have always had to fight to get my ski boot because of a race fit racing boot. This year with my somewhat new Solomons the fight became worse. I did not know if it was the boots or me turning 66. It has always been tight fit and I have had to Keep my boots under the car heater just to have a chance. No way could I ever take my boots off during the day. I was at the Boot Dr in Telluride and I asked them why the Solomon seemed to be even harder to get on. They said it was because of the materials used in the liner. In the boot accessory area I saw the product below. I thought it was "hokey" but I bought it anyway. What a lifesaver and you could probably make one yourself. Now my boots slip right on with no fight at all. You should see all the happy faces at the resort as I let the older population borrow mine.


Edited by levy1 - 5/12/14 at 4:36am
post #10 of 18
I have wanted the boot bag heater for a couple of years but I was not going to give up almost $200. After reading several positive posts and reviews I just bought one discounted down to $75. Next year I am going in hot!!!
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I have wanted the boot bag heater for a couple of years but I was not going to give up almost $200. After reading several positive posts and reviews I just bought one discounted down to $75. Next year I am going in hot!!!
icon14.gif
I got a great deal on a Hot Gear bag back when I had too-big, too-soft Wrong Boot boots even though I didn't have particularly cold feet. I came this close to selling it, but fortunately was put in Lange RS 120 SCs, which I think are a tuned-down version of the WC boots, before I got around to listing them. I absolutely adore them, and they feel great when they're on, but for a long time it felt like I was going to break an ankle putting them on or taking them off if I didn't use the heated bag, and they were a challenge even with the bag. Now that the stock liners have packed out they're much less painful to deal with, but that also means they don't perform as well, which in turn means I'll probably be setting myself up for more donning-and-doffing pain next fall with some new liners unless my boot guy can make it better with some tweaking. At least they feel marvelous while I'm wearing them.

I will say that overskiing softer skis is a real possibility with stiffer boots, but I like a stiffer ski and some camber, too, so it hasn't been a problem...so far, at least.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I have wanted the boot bag heater for a couple of years but I was not going to give up almost $200. After reading several positive posts and reviews I just bought one discounted down to $75. Next year I am going in hot!!!
icon14.gif
but that also means they don't perform as well, which in turn means I'll probably be setting myself up for more donning-and-doffing pain next fall with some new liners unless my boot guy can make it better with some tweaking. At least they feel marvelous while I'm wearing them.

I will say that overskiing softer skis is a real possibility with stiffer boots, but I like a stiffer ski and some camber, too, so it hasn't been a problem...so far, at least.

I made a huge mistake of skiing in pain for a couple of years. I had my boots worked on in a couple of shops. The main shop where I lived finally after 2 years admitted they did not have the correct piece to enlarge the shell. After they bought the correct form I skied pain free for the first time last year. There is a boot fitter out there that can make the boots pain free. I found a great shop by asking on this forum.

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

I made a huge mistake of skiing in pain for a couple of years. I had my boots worked on in a couple of shops. The main shop where I lived finally after 2 years admitted they did not have the correct piece to enlarge the shell. After they bought the correct form I skied pain free for the first time last year. There is a boot fitter out there that can make the boots pain free. I found a great shop by asking on this forum.
I consider pain free once they're on to be pain free enough! A little struggle getting them on and off is a small price to pay.

I too went through almost two stupid years of pain in the wrong boots, going back time after time to a not very interested bootfitter who couldn't or wouldn't compensate for their softness, excessive forward lean, and completely crushed toes, assuming he even realized the boots were the problem.

Not only are the Langes comfortable; they bumped my technique a few levels, made it much easier to develop skills, and their upright cuff finally allowed me to get out of the back seat. I got my current guy's name on a women's ski forum. I figure that despite my enthusiasm and description of my skiing and ambitions, the first guy blew me off as a stocky middle aged woman who wanted comfort over all, and I was so ignorant that I didn't know any better than to take what he gave me. The new guy asks questions, listens carefully, and went through a very detailed process that ended up giving me exactly what I need. All I had to do was let him do the work. Imagine--he wants to help me ski better and have more fun!
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post

I recently bought my first pair of boots(after 20 years of renting) and have 8 days on them so far. They are Full Tilts that came with the #6 tongue, and after a couple tweaks and custom footbeds, they fit perfectly. My question is, how can I tell if the #6 flex is right for me. Being new to good boots, I don't really know how to tell. When I was shopping for boots the fitter mentioned getting stiffer tongues down the road if I needed them, but didn't say how I would know. I would ask him, but he is 700 miles away and my season is over. One of the boots he had me try was a Lange RX 130 LV that he thought would be too stiff, but after flexing in it he said I flexed it just fine. After some internet searching, the guesses on Full Tilt #6 flex equivalency are anywhere from 60 to 100. That makes me think I could possibly up my stiffness to an 8 or 10, but not sure. I am 6 foot, 190, aggressive and fast skier, skiing groomed, trees, and bowls. Any input or advice would be great!

 

One thing I don't understand I guess, is what is the correlation between #6 and the normal rating system. I see where you say that is a 60-100, where does that info come from? Just off hand at 190lbs, you need more then 60. 

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post

One thing I don't understand I guess, is what is the correlation between #6 and the normal rating system. I see where you say that is a 60-100, where does that info come from? Just off hand at 190lbs, you need more then 60. 
That comes from doing a google search which was mainly Internet forums. Full Tilt doesn't say or measure the relation between their numbers(4,6,8,10, and maybe a 12) to the standard system. The numbers online were a bunch of people guessing or educated guessing at the translation of numbers just by past experience with boots. That's why the big spread of 60-100, people guessing.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post
 

Then there is the temperature thing.

When it is really cold almost all boots are really stiff.

In spring slush you can practically telemark with 60-80 flex boots.

I have two pair of the same Atomic shells, one 90 and the other 120.

Below zero I can't tell them apart.

At reasonable temperatures I always ski the 120's because I like to be able to pressure my tips.

I've wanted to do that experiment for some time, but only have one pair of boots that are 90. Like you said, fine in cold temps, spring skiing gets dicey though.

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post


That comes from doing a google search which was mainly Internet forums. Full Tilt doesn't say or measure the relation between their numbers(4,6,8,10, and maybe a 12) to the standard system. The numbers online were a bunch of people guessing or educated guessing at the translation of numbers just by past experience with boots. That's why the big spread of 60-100, people guessing.

 

Well that is kind of an interesting way to do things. 

post #18 of 18

The higher the number the stiffer the tounge. You will have to try them to figure it out.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion