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95 to105 mm width skis - Page 2

post #31 of 44

At your weight I would pass on the Q98 and Rev 98.  They'll likely be too soft.  The Rossi E98 is exellent, but can be demanding; don't get in the back seat or you're toast.  It also wants to GO.  FAST.  It is, however, a better version of the Mantra for what the Mantra should be.  I love to drive skis from the front and even I found the Mantra rather planky, while the E98 was much better.  On the other hand, the Bonafide is a kinder, gentler, better all-rounder than the E98.  More forgiving, doesn't need to be driven, you can get in the back seat a bit and not regret it. Not terribly "exciting" on the groomers and not the best at any one thing, but the Bonafide is oustanding with its ability to be very good at many things.

 

From your list, if you want something stable, not too demanding, yet versatile and fun, the Bonafide should probably be at the very top of your demo list.

post #32 of 44
By the description, you may be a candidate for an 88 ski (see the new thread on them). But since you wantedc to stick to 100 mm one ski quivers, I'd avoid the Mantra and e98 like a plague, too stiff too expert oriented. Someone who avoids bumps just does not have the technique to ski those skis, Josh is right there (and, yes, he is better than we are). Same story with Hell and Back, Nordica skis lreally ike technical drivers (and that includes the NRGy line). Bonafide will be fine, I heard very good things about Line Supernatural 100, and Lines tend to be forgiving. I don't see anything bad in the Soul7/Sin7 choice, yes they are soft, but he is not a charging skier. Atomic Ritual or Automatic is also a fine choice. Just don't get anything too stiff, otherwise you will ski in the backseat forever.

Last advice- change the boots NOW. Modern boots are different and the sole on your old boots may be worn out to the point if being a safety hazard. That will make the biggest difference to your skiing.
post #33 of 44
Plus, boots blowing up while you are skiing can hurt..
post #34 of 44

But really, 20 year old boots that are comfy:eek  You really need new boots.  I think og's comments were pretty much right on.  As a fellow big guy, 200-210 depending on the day.  If you want any float at all, go wider and longer.  I have some Armada TST's in a 193 that you would likely love.  Lots of tip rocker so they plane up in pow and turn on a dime for the same reason.  A little softer, so they are easy to go slower on, but can still go pretty damn fast if that is what you want.  Don't let the 193 fool you, as the running length on piste is about 180 due to the tip rocker.  But the extra length for pow is mandatory for a guy your size.  There are lots of great skis out there.  Read the reviews and get something 185+ in length and 100-110 under foot and I thing you will be stoked regardless if you do your homework correctly.  Have fun shopping.  O, BTW.  Start Haus has their Nordica Blem sale going now.  Look at the El Capo in the 185.  http://www.epicski.com/t/127640/2014-nordica-blems-are-live-at-the-start-haus#post_1729950

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post


Last advice- change the boots NOW. Modern boots are different and the sole on your old boots may be worn out to the point if being a safety hazard. 

Tell that to the guys at full tilt and dalbello who bought the Raichle Flexon molds.  As far as the sole being too worn--easy enough to test--if the release torques are within spec the boots are ok as far as wear. 

 

Maybe we could just put "buy new boots" and "take lessons" at the top of the gear page and save everyone the trouble of repeating it in every thread.

post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I have NO idea what your... rant?... is about. My question was in regard to the statement there is no such thing as an "advanced intermediate". Nothing more. To me, skiers who position themselves as level 7 or 8 are advanced intermediates. They may look like experts to some people (and some of them may think they are experts), but they are not.

The guy says he is an advanced intermediate who skis with his kids, but wants to move up.

I truly have NO idea why you would quote my post in reference to whatever the heck your point was. No one is talking about leaving kids at home here. We're trying to find a guy a ski.

Sorry.... smile.gif

I was noodling a bunch of thoughts that this thread for some reason provoked and cooking dinner at the same time...kids got hungry while I was noodling and I hit "Submit" as a "save" feature. Something I generally try not to do, apologies for that.

For the OP, that nagging thought is that family skiing, at least with younger kids, is mostly a finesse game ( and maybe skiing on warfarin, too ) and it bugs me that weight alone changes that in ski selection. Part of that thought is that parents who deliberately ski with their kids are acting as instructors, intentionally or not, and what I was responding to in a not obvious way is that parents maybe should choose an "instructor ski" in order to bring their kids along to the terrain they really want to ski.

But in the case of the parent who isn't an instructor by trade, that approach is more emotionally based than pure technique based, and in a different forum maybe I'll raise the question on the IQ of skiing vs. the EQ (intelligence vs. emotional intelligence). In my experience, they are different things and the skis are more than wallpaper there, because there is some effect to what the parent is visually modeling and that probably means more than edge hold.

I'm not saying and am not qualified to say that weight doesn't turn a ski with a charging soul into one with a finesse soul, but I wonder if that is truly a gap or just a tendency to lead recommendations by weight? The whole thing infers a lot more than was asked, although I'll get off my sword and say that's the sort of thought provocation I personally like to hear.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Neustkg, you'll fold a soul rider, sin 7, and a soul 7 in any length at your weight.

Of the skis mentioned for your ability level, the Bonafide is the easy choice. An Atomic Ritual could work well too.

Atomic 
Ritual Thumbs Up

 

Bonafide is a puss mobile!

post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Tell that to the guys at full tilt and dalbello who bought the Raichle Flexon molds.  As far as the sole being too worn--easy enough to test--if the release torques are within spec the boots are ok as far as wear. 

Maybe we could just put "buy new boots" and "take lessons" at the top of the gear page and save everyone the trouble of repeating it in every thread.

I thought the OP was in Technica TNS which is a conventional overlap design, and that generation of boots is fairly obsolete right now.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asks me about the new skis to buy and I see him/her in century-old cracked boots, I'd be a rich man (and more often than not those guys are interested in buying a Mantra or Aura...).
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post


I thought the OP was in Technica TNS which is a conventional overlap design, and that generation of boots is fairly obsolete right now.
 

Could you clarify? Are you saying that conventional overlap boots are obsolete, or that old conventional overlap boots are obsolete? I'm assuming the latter. If so, what is it that you feel has changed enough to make older boots obsolete, other than the liners, which are of course replaceable? There are some new bells and whistles--walk mode on some models for example, but as far as basic architecture and construction-what? (This is a question, not an argument.)

post #40 of 44
Could be he's refering to the newer cuff's are designed to work better with the newer skis. I have been told the newer cuff's have more lateral stiffness which help's engage the tips of the skis easier.

So as you press your shin into the boot cuff on an angle as your going to start the turn the newer cuff respone's quicker. Those may not be the correct words to explain it, but I thinnk most people will understand.

To support what he's pointing out, just look around the lift lines and see what people have on there feet. I have noticed lot's of casual skiers in old boots with newer skis. By casual skiers, I mean skier's who don't ski as much as most of here on Episki.
post #41 of 44

The TNS's are from the mid 90's at the latest. It is not so much that these are 20 years old in design but 20 years old in materials..and 20 years ago, that material was very suspect, TNS's are PRONE to breaking apart and not IF but when. The TNS, for the most pat skis well, not the best by todays modern upright design but better than many boots from that era. I would suggest considering a new boot because these will "Explode" at some point, in the meantime keep an eye at the instep of the lower shell, this is were cracking can start. 

 

As far as skis..a lot of good choices mentioned so far. By the time you demo (as suggested) everything mentioned, it will be the end of the season and a whole new selection will be offered. There are no perfect skis..all the skis mentioned will do 6 out of 10 things the same. the other 4 out of 10 are the variables. Do you want a ski that will enhance what you do well or help you do what you aren't doing that well? 

post #42 of 44
It's a legitimate question. In my limited experience the new boots are a lot softer front to back and much stiffer laterally. A modern boot also has less forward lean. Of course plastic bots that are 20 year old will break on you, unless they spent all those years in the dark closet. I did have an interesting experience earlier this year when I had to ski a couple of days on my old HotRods (Doberman shell, about ten years old), those we're stiff to the point that it really affected my skiing in a very negative way. Nothing you can't adjust to in the long run, but it illustrates the difference. My current boot is the same shell two generations later and the difference in flex pattern is significant.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

There is no such thing as an advanced intermediate biggrin.gif. Ski what you can work.

Nobody "crushes" anything skiing with their kids.

Say that after skiing with my kids!;)

post #44 of 44
Thread Starter 

Thought I would give an update.  I was going to try to demo a few pairs of skis this year, but never got a chance to hit the demo days at Copper (I have a season pass this year).  I read through this thread and looked at reviews of different skis listed and looked at prices for a few skis (volkl Mantra, Blizzard Bonafides, Rossignol Experience 98s, Nordica Hell and Backs).  I noticed most of these skis had to be skied fairly hard, then I saw something about the Atomic Alibi's.  Started reading reviews and noticed these are a more forgiving ski.  You can carve and smear turns pretty well according to this ski's review.  So I started looking at prices.  Found a new pair (187 cm) at a ski shop at Stowe ski area in VT for about $425 and free shipping.  I contacted them to see what the price would be with Marker Jester bindings.  Total price was $525 including shipping and mounting the bindings.  Got them a few months ago and took them to a local Boulder ski shop who did a binding check and gave them a free hot wax.  I was concerned about my old boots as the toe and heel pads had some wear, but the shop said they were still just fine.

 

Took them to Copper and skied the groomers fairly hard with my BIL about mid December and found that they seemed to ski shorter than my 186 cm Atomic Beta Rides (due to tip and tail rocker).  Very good on the groomers.  I thought with the 98 mm width, it would take a few days of skiing to get used to them.  I got the hang of them after one or two runs.  Skied again with my BIL and oldest daughter the next day (this time skiing more easier blues and greens).  Skied a week later with my 6 yo son only under the Kokomo lift.  

 

Very happy with this ski so far and want to try out some powder when we get a good day (probably on a weekend when I can get to the mountain just after a storm or while it is snowing).  I was amazed at how short they feel and how light they are.  I do find I catch the tails sometimes when I am skating to get started.  Something I'm not used to, yet.

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