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I Was Friends With An Internet Troll

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Some Internet Trolls are apparently quite likeable in real life. Some, not so much...

 

http://www.xojane.com/it-happened-to-me/i-was-friends-with-an-internet-troll

 

Reading that instantly brought to mind the creepy bookstore scene in Your Friends & Neighbors.

post #2 of 27
Moving to lounge, more applicable topic there.
post #3 of 27

The worst one I'm real friends with, lifelong family friends, doesn't drink at all.  Pretty sure he'd be happier if he drank a LOT!  Instead he just hones resentments against everyone and everything.  Thinks he's a genius and everyone else is a moron.  Truly delusional.

post #4 of 27
This is the picture of an Internet troll in real life: an unhappy, substance-abusing, violent, unemployed liar with no friends. I know this isn't the story of every Internet troll, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was the story of many of them.

 

 

Hah!^  The people that seemingly have their shit together are the worst trolls.  We call them sociopaths in the real world.  Scary thing is they run our government and media and banks.  I am enjoying how trolling as become a "thing" lately and is popping up in these news articles and blog posts all over. 

post #5 of 27

You might be interested in this story. I think there are also different levels of trolls. Some have a specific agenda. Probably common is that you'll never "win" with them.

 

"Don't Feet the Haters: Confessions of an Internet Troll"

http://99u.com/articles/25151/dont-feed-the-haters-the-confessions-of-a-former-troll

post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
Hah!^  The people that seemingly have their shit together are the worst trolls.  We call them sociopaths in the real world.  Scary thing is they run our government and media and banks.

 

I was thinking along the same lines recently, binge watching on Netflix seasons 1 and 2 of "House of Cards". How "Shakespearean" the story struck me - lying, deception, betrayal, greed, murder, etc. Not mapping exactly to any specific piece, but The Scottish Play comes to mind. Looking forward to see what becomes of "Lady Macbeth" in coming seasons, now that Frank has become King, er, President.   ;-)

 

Of course Shakespeare nailed human nature pretty well several hundred years ago, which is why his works are timeless, and still so interesting and relevant today. Kevin Spacey has had a fairly successful 10+ year run as Artistic Director of The Old Vic Theatre Company. It would be interesting to know what his input has been and get his take on the HoC storyline as it relates to Shakespeare. Maybe when the whole thing has wrapped he'll get into that.

post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
 

 

Hah!^  The people that seemingly have their shit together are the worst trolls.  We call them sociopaths in the real world. 

 

High functioning sociopath, if you don't mind.

 

post #8 of 27
Quote:

Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 

Looking forward to see what becomes of "Lady Macbeth" in coming seasons, now that Frank has become King, er, President.   ;-)

 

My understanding is that the Netflix House of Cards very closely follows the plot of the BBC series of the same name which was  made back in the nineties.  So, if you want to find out what happens  you could always rent that.  I won't give anything away here.

post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 

Ah, right. Forgot about the BBC series, which I haven't seen, but knew about. Perhaps it took some inspiration from The Bard?

 

In any event, no, don't want to know the outcome ahead of time. As with "Who killed Laura Palmer" and lots of quality series stuff on (cable) tv since the journey is the reward.  ;-)

post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Ah, right. Forgot about the BBC series, which I haven't seen, but knew about. Perhaps it took some inspiration from The Bard?

 

 

Unlikely. 

 

I don't think very many BBC writers are familiar with Shakespeare.  (c:

post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
Hah!^  The people that seemingly have their shit together are the worst trolls.  We call them sociopaths in the real world.  Scary thing is they run our government and media and banks.

 

I was thinking along the same lines recently, binge watching on Netflix seasons 1 and 2 of "House of Cards". How "Shakespearean" the story struck me - lying, deception, betrayal, greed, murder, etc. Not mapping exactly to any specific piece, but The Scottish Play comes to mind.

 

 

The original  maps directly to Richard III.      In the middle of season 1 there is even a scene in which they reveal it to the clueless - Ian Richardson and Diane Fletcher are indoors , and Ian Richardson holds his paper up and talks about acting all Richard III to the press.

The game of "I will say what I am about to do only in a different context" is all over that series.     For example, the "gaining trust and  training followers" method Urquhart tells his wife he's going to use on Matty is also exactly the method he then proceeds to use on you, the viewer.

post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 

I just recently watched Al Pacino's "Looking For Richard", and thought about "Richard III" as a possible inspiration for the American HoC, but...  Maybe the American version is an inspired bit of a mashup of different works by Shakespeare? Certainly more than one features a bloody/ruthless lust for and ascension to power.

 

Interestingly Kevin Spacey was featured prominently in "Looking For Richard", and put on a notable production of "Richard III" at The Old Vic with himself in the title role.

 

Methinks I'll wait till American HoC finishes up after what I'm guessing will be another season, maybe two, then watch the original BBC version.

post #13 of 27

Minority report.

I watched the BBC version several years ago and liked it.  When the American version came along, I watched it at first but didn't enjoy traveling over the same territory with new characters, not one of which I found admirable in any way.  For me it wasn't knowing the general plot trajectory and the actual end that made me stop watching.  It was not enjoying the journey.   

post #14 of 27

I watched the original BBC production when it was shown on PBS sometime in the early nineties.  Amazingly, the show was written and produced before anyone had heard of Monica Lewinski.   IIRC, Russell Baker provided the intros and explicitly discussed the parallels with Lady MacBeth.

 

I haven't seen the new version yet.  I have a hard time believing anyone could improve on Ian Richardson as FU.

 

Here he is in his most famous role:

 

post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walt View Post

 

I haven't seen the new version yet.  I have a hard time believing anyone could improve on Ian Richardson as FU.

 

Nice that they chose a name for the main character in the American production so the initials were consistent. Were there cuff-links in the original?   ;-)

 

I noticed on IMDB the BBC "House of Cards" ran for one season in 1990, followed by "To Play the King" in 1993 and "The Final Cut" in 1995. When you think of the BBC "House of Cards" are you thinking of just that first season, or all three?

 

That Grey Poupon narrative had a reprise recently as well. Good stories never die.   ;-)

 

 

Along that line, I watched this recently, and quite enjoyed it...

 

 

As per LiquidFeet's post above, to each his own, but if nothing else it's an interesting time capsule.

post #16 of 27
Quote:

 

As per LiquidFeet's post above, to each his own, but if nothing else it's an interesting time capsule.

 

 

 

 

 

Talking of time capsules, you might want to have a look at the BBC's The Age of Kings  - It's 6DVDs'  worth of R2 H4P1 H4P2 H5 R3   re-segmented into televisionable episodes, with character & actor continuity and, best of all, truly continuous character arcs, esp. in Hal's case.    That sort of continuity completely changes the plays, and the time capsule value is insane (a too-young-to-drink Sean Connery does a brilliant Hotspur frex)

post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 

Wow, that looks phenomenal - thx for pointing it out!

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Age_of_Kings

 

Unfortunately not available on any streaming service or at my public library, but can be bought on DVD at Amazon. Might have to spring for it.

 

There is a cool "making of" vid on youtube...

 

post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Quote:

 

I noticed on IMDB the BBC "House of Cards" ran for one season in 1990, followed by "To Play the King" in 1993 and "The Final Cut" in 1995. When you think of the BBC "House of Cards" are you thinking of just that first season, or all three?

 

All three.  It became known as the "House of Cards Trilogy". 

 

"House of Cards" proper ends with FU becoming Prime Minister.  "To Play the King" and "The Final Cut" concern his actions while in that office.  I hope I'm not giving anything away.

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 

 

All three.  It became known as the "House of Cards Trilogy". 

 

"House of Cards" proper ends with FU becoming Prime Minister.  "To Play the King" and "The Final Cut" concern his actions while in that office.  I hope I'm not giving anything away.

 

See, after the first season of the US House of Cards, I tried out the BBC version. The depiction of women in the BBC version is very dated and stands out to the US version (the reporter character MUCH more naive about his true nature in the BBC version and generally acts "in love" with FU.

 

I really like both portrayals- they do brutally vindictive in two very different ways.

 

SPOILER ALERT- The first two seasons of the US House of Cards generally track with the BBC House of cards (the first miniseries). DO NOT WATCH the BBC version as there are significant twists that will wreck the impact in the US version.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 

 

All three.  It became known as the "House of Cards Trilogy". 

 

"House of Cards" proper ends with FU becoming Prime Minister.  "To Play the King" and "The Final Cut" concern his actions while in that office.  I hope I'm not giving anything away.

 

See, after the first season of the US House of Cards, I tried out the BBC version. The depiction of women in the BBC version is very dated and stands out to the US version (the reporter character MUCH more naive about his true nature in the BBC version and generally acts "in love" with FU.

 

I don't see that as 'dated depiction of women'.   

I see that as a completely intentional result of the writers' premise  "Mattie is not a sociopath and yet finds herself following pushed into a pattern of behaviour only true sociopaths can come out of without emotional scarring".       Which premise is born out of the overarching premise of the series:   Sociopaths in power push the people around them into patterns those same sociopaths are comfortable with

FU was never going to let Mattie get close to him unless she fitted the role of star-struck-bit-of-fluff, unlike FU, Mattie can't act an emotion without also feeling it.

Witness that an absolutely analogous process to Mattie's happens with Miles Anderson's character, particularly when his very real attachment to Penny is endangered.  

Witness that FU, as a highly functioning sociopath, controls the  people nominally above him (sociopaths also, just less competent) by allowing himself to appear pushed.

So, in effect, the BBC version takes two absolutely ancient Richard III roles (Mattie is Anne Neville; Roger is  Sir James Tyrell)  and modernises them to show the effects such roles have on the people who have to fill them.

 

Is this modern or dated?   The obvious corollary "Only sociopaths follow leaders without having some love for them" seems to me like it could have dropped out of last year's Psychology Today.


Edited by cantunamunch - 5/1/14 at 6:40am
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
post #22 of 27

wrong thread too many windows open duh!!!


Edited by Josh Matta - 5/4/14 at 12:37pm
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 

Now trolling by posting in the wrong thread? 

 

Now that's a creative approach!  Thumbs Up 

post #24 of 27

I don't know any internet trolls but I do know of a bunch of thread drifters...and they are all posing in this thread.

post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Now trolling by posting in the wrong thread? 

 

Now that's a creative approach!  Thumbs Up 

 

 

hhhahah or very just not paying attention :P

post #26 of 27

how can one post in this wrong thread? It'll just make it about something else.

This was a thread about trolls, now it's about House of Cards.

Next page maybe...The Airplane. No, we're over that. Kind of.

post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

how can one post in this wrong thread? It'll just make it about something else.

This was a thread about trolls, now it's about House of Cards.

Next page maybe...The Airplane. No, we're over that. Kind of.

Squirrel....

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