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I need some help picking gear [first purchase after renting for a long time, NYC]

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

So I've been skiing rental for a long time now, and renting gear is no longer financially smart, based on the amount of times I go.

 

I'm into aerials, tricks, downhill carving, and I ski fairly aggressively, compared to most. I need some help finding gear that's quality, comfortable, and reliable, and skis that fit the criteria. What would you guys recommend? I'm a beginner as far as buying these things goes, I only own a helmet, goggles, and balaclava. I'm 6'3" if that matters.

 

And help would be greatly appreciated. 

post #2 of 19
post #3 of 19

+1 for the Official Epic response.

post #4 of 19
X3 get to a great boot fitter near to where you ski most of the time. Tell us where you live and ski we can tell you someone to go to.

Wear your everyday shoes when you go to get fitted, there's a long process, about 2 hours is what you should set aside to buy boots. They really are that important.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
I live in Westchester County, New York.
post #6 of 19
So you ski in NY state ? or VT ?
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
New York
post #8 of 19

May be one of the locals will chime in soon with a boot fitter for you. 

 

Have you had a chance to look at the links in the second post ?

 

May be read Ski Magazines Sept issue for reviews of skis for something that may appeal to you.

 

What brand or skis have you been renting ?

 

Have you taken lessons ?

 

Do you know your skill level?

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

Brand: No idea, haven't went since winter

Lessons: No, completely self-taught

Skill level: I'd say out of 5, a 3.7 or so

 

I want a nice setup for the reasons listed above (aerials, tricks, and downhill carving) and because when I go to college (upstate) it'll be an activity that takes up my time when I'm not studying.

 

All the reviews I read for Rossignol, Saloman, and Full Tilt have been very good, but I assume most are just people who haven't really had many other boots.

post #10 of 19

Westchester County is close enough to NYC to make it worth the trip to see Jeff Rich.  But be sure to make an appointment.

 

Jeff Rich

U.S. Orthotic Center

515 Madison Avenue
New York NY 10022

email: drbalance@msn.com

(212) 832-1648

 

And don't fixate on brand of boot.  The best boot for you is the one that fits the best, regardless of brand or color.

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks. How does the process work? I set up an appointment, tell him what I'm looking for, and go from there?

 

How much does the service cost?

post #12 of 19

Boot fitting usually is included in the price of the boots. Generally, you will will need orthotics, which will have their own charge. To get mtcyclist to respond directly to your question, an email will be sent to him if you either quote his post or put the @ in front of his name like: @Nuff.

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuff View Post
 

Thanks. How does the process work? I set up an appointment, tell him what I'm looking for, and go from there?

 

How much does the service cost?

The process should take a couple hours.  That's why getting an appointment is the best approach.

 

Here is a thread from a couple years ago that mentions a few boot fitters in the Tri-State area:

http://www.epicski.com/t/107980/looking-for-a-reputable-boot-fitting-shop-in-the-tristate-area-ny-nj-ct

 

Another new member, @Jonathan Keller got his gear at Emilios in Forest Hills.  Apparently the place has been around for quite a while.  He just started skiing this winter.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

 

Here is a thread from a couple years ago that mentions a few boot fitters in the Tri-State area:

http://www.epicski.com/t/107980/looking-for-a-reputable-boot-fitting-shop-in-the-tristate-area-ny-nj-ct

 

Another new member, @Jonathan Keller got his gear at Emilios in Forest Hills.  Apparently the place has been around for quite a while.  He just started skiing this winter.

Good information in the linked thread.  

 

Read this, http://www.epicski.com/a/ski-boots-the-most-important-piece-of-gear-you-will-own  and then head over to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology.  That will give you a good introduction to the process of boot fitting.  Just remember that if the boot feels "comfy" when you first put it on, it is too big.  The correct size boot should feel pretty tight when you first try it on because it will loosen up over time.  A fitter can fix too small but nothing can be done about too big.

post #15 of 19

Boots are definitely where its at.  I sleep in mine they are so darn comfortable. 

 

Regarding skis, you sound like you're looking for an all mountain twin tip.  From personal experience I would recommend either the Volkl Bridge or the Salomon Shogun.  The Volkl is narrower at the waist and may prove to be a better east coast ski.  The Shogun (which they no longer make btw) is about 100mm underfoot and floats exceptionally well in deeper snow yet doesn't really compromise anything on hardpack.  The Shogun also has a bamboo core which makes it really poppy and playful.  I've skied both in just about every set of conditions I can think of and they hold up fine.  The only differences I can think of are that the Shoguns perform better in deep snow, while the Bridge is a bit more aggressive on piste. 

post #16 of 19

This thread from the Beginner Zone includes a video related to the boot fitting process:

http://www.epicski.com/t/116467/buying-boots-what-does-that-boot-flex-mean

 

Here is a fairly typical description for the ability levels used by many ski schools in the U.S.  The better you can describe your ability level, the more you can help a boot fitter put you in the optimal boot.

 

Level One: "Never-Ever"
Level One skiers are first time skiers who have never skied before.

Level Two
Level Two skiers are cautious novices who are able to do a " snow plow" (wedge) turn both ways and are able to stop, but linking turns smoothly may be difficult. zSB(3,3)Level Two skiers may have skied once or twice before.

Level Three
Level Three skiers are confident novices who are able to stop and make round snow plow turns on easy beginner trails.

Level Four
Level Four skiers are cautious intermediate skiers who can link turns but still moderate speed. Level Four skiers ski in a small wedge and their skis may even be parallel at the end of the turn on green or easy blue trails. Level Four is a transition level in which skiers will begin to ski more blue intermediate runs.

Level Five
Level Five skiers are intermediates who are confident on easy blue runs and ski mostly parallel but may at times use the wedge to begin a turn or to stop. Level Five skiers may be cautious on intermediate trails that are slightly steep or icy.

Level Six
Level Six skiers confidently make parallel turns on blue runs but do not ski many advanced trails. Level Six skiers use their poles to time turns. A Level Six skier is interested in learning to ski better on more challenging terrain.

Level Seven
Level Seven skiers ski controlled parallel turns and can ski very well on blue trails. Level Seven skiers can control their speed and rhythm on black diamond trails, but they are looking to ski on challenging trails with better style. Level Seven skiers can adjust the size and length of their turns and are learning to ski on a variety of different types of snow and terrain.

Level Eight
Level Eight skiers ski with good technique on all terrain and snow conditions. Level Eight skiers can ski moguls and are able to ski black diamond trails with confidence using carved turns.

Level Nine
Level Nine skiers enjoy the challenge of difficult ski trails and ski moguls, steeps, and other black diamond terrain.

post #17 of 19
The best thing about getting skis at Emilio's is lifetime free tuning. And for me, they are very very convenient. I got a decent for on my boots there, though it could be better. Having read about the process more and more, I do not have a perfect fit, just an average one. However, still much better than the fit of any rental boot, and cheaper than renting, even if I replace the boot in a year or two (which will be likely once I have a better idea of what I want/need in a boot).
post #18 of 19
Oh yea, Nuff, wear thin or ultra thin ski socks for the boot fitting. Even a liner sock will do.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 

All noted. Thanks for the help guys. I'll try out that boot-fitter in the city when time comes. 

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