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Please rate my stance in this picture - Page 8

post #211 of 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

Yep! Most people know that when you are talking square o the HILL means Fallline

 

I wouldn't, the square-T above is not an instrument de ski!

 

 

Both Hips parallel to direction ski are traveling vs. not parallel, how is that

I got it, right thought wrong wording I think.

 

Square to the hill implies..... Perpendicular to the general direction of travel........ might be better? In the sense that you travel down the hill so your shoulder remain square to the hill so to speak.

post #212 of 225

Simple... pelvis/shoulders should be square to the resultant force vector. Skiing square in the negative generally means a person skiing with hips/shoulders perpendicular to the skis at all time. Shoulders square to the hill is an oversimplification, but yes, the skis are going one direction, the pelvis/shoulders are facing down the fall line*.

 

* the shorter the turn radius, the more this is likely to be so. The longer, see the first sentence.

post #213 of 225

See " wall position"  theory  USSA Giant Slalom Technique and Tactics.  Can't follow the "resultant force vector".     YM

post #214 of 225
Thread Starter 

So I skied last week with my new Volkl Tigersharks from Mogsie on our 300 ft vertical home hill, 150 acres, Ohio hill. This is the perfect ski in a 174 for a small hill. Loved the little carver. 

 

As was noted my form needs work and I picked out working on angulation by pinching my hips. This stopped my shoulder from dropping,  my hand from dropping and falling back and I just cannot explain it but my stance was more forward to me as in added the anglelation. I definitely liked the edge feeling and it seemed like more edge and more control. I just do not understand what made me move forward over the ski. 

 

What would you suggest as my next exercise?

post #215 of 225
Thread Starter 

I want to thank all of you for helping me to ski better. As I stated I just pretty much ran high speed greens and blues for the speed I thought. I had taken a few years off from skiing and I had lost angulation. I did not realize it but I know something was wrong when my speed was so fast in a blue lesson class I had to ski out of it because I could not keep my speed down. I knew something was wrong as I was unable to scrub any speed off. 

 

Last year I went to Sunday river and signed up for 3 days of lessons. In a very short time I learned to set my hip so I could angulate and let the skis come across my body. This keeps my shoulders level, my arms out in front, my belly pointed down the hill and total control in my speed. I am sure I am not explaining it correctly. With the new angulation my speed was cut in half and I could ski at any speed I wanted to. This new feeling of carving and confidence really notched up my enjoyment of skiing if that was possible as I breathe snow!

 

Thanks again to all of you who helped me. I really appreciate it!

post #216 of 225

Hey, levy1, I wondered how your Sunday River week went.  Glad to hear you enjoyed it.

post #217 of 225

Obviously I'm way late here but I scanned this with interest.

Angulation: what you do to balance on an edged ski.

If there's a body part out of whack it's probably got something to do with something going on with the feet and what is happening on the snow.

No one wants to fall and we naturally do what we need to to stay upright.

The suggestion to ski with Bud or some other top bootfitter was the best one I saw.

Good Luck

Have fun

post #218 of 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

@metaphor "square" is used in general to mean a right angle. As in " Did you check the frame for square?" or " make that square to ..."
There we go with those words again.

Tog, it's one of those words that can be used many different ways.  In addition to referring to a right angle, it can also be used to describe level, or parallel.  In the case of how it's used in skiing, in the form of "skiing square", it means body facing the direction the skis are pointing, the parallel usage of the term.  But if that seems too confusing, you can alternatively think of it from the perspective that lines projected through the shoulders and the hip sockets are perpendicular to the skis.  Use whichever mental picture works to let the concept be understood.  

post #219 of 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

So I skied last week with my new Volkl Tigersharks from Mogsie on our 300 ft vertical home hill, 150 acres, Ohio hill. This is the perfect ski in a 174 for a small hill. Loved the little carver. 

 

As was noted my form needs work and I picked out working on angulation by pinching my hips. This stopped my shoulder from dropping,  my hand from dropping and falling back and I just cannot explain it but my stance was more forward to me as in added the anglelation. I definitely liked the edge feeling and it seemed like more edge and more control. I just do not understand what made me move forward over the ski. 

 

What would you suggest as my next exercise?

 

Here are several drills to work on, Levy1, to keep embedding your new angulated stance.  If you think you want to try any of them, let me know and I'll provide execution details for you.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #220 of 225
Thread Starter 

Those drills look great and I would appreciate any additional info. I am really looking to improving my skiing this year. 

thank you

post #221 of 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

Those drills look great and I would appreciate any additional info. I am really looking to improving my skiing this year. 

thank you

Airplane - Do the bulk of the tipping at the waist, don't do it with just moving the arms.  Torso/shoulders tip as a unit.  Wings tip away from the turn, opposite from what an airplane would do.  Tipping starts at the start of the turn, the change of which way the wings are tipping happening in the transition between turns.

 

Pole touch - Poles extend at approx 45 degrees to the gound, with tips of poles always in contact with the snow.  Reach as far to the outside of the turn with your outside pole as you can.  In this picture it's my left arm/pole I'm reaching with.  The further you reach, the more you angulate.

 

Level Poles - Poles remain perpendicular to the torso.  You keep the poles level to the snow by keeping your torso upright.  Letting the torso tip while keeping the poles level to the snow by moving the hands and arms is a drill execution failure.  

 

Schlopy - Outside hand placed on hip, pushes pelvis into the turn, in this picture I'm pushing my pelvis to the right of my skis.  Inside hand and arm are held high and pushed forward, bringing the entire right side of your body forward with them.  This drill introduces something called counter, which is the turning of the pelvis towards the outside of the turn, which helps a skier angulate more strongly, and other good things.

 

All these drills are explained in detail, with slow motion video, and are introduce at a strategic point in the learning cycle, in my Building Blocks DVD instructional series.

post #222 of 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
 

Airplane - Do the bulk of the tipping at the waist, don't do it with just moving the arms.  Torso/shoulders tip as a unit.  Wings tip away from the turn, opposite from what an airplane would do.  Tipping starts at the start of the turn, the change of which way the wings are tipping happening in the transition between turns.

 

Pole touch - Poles extend at approx 45 degrees to the gound, with tips of poles always in contact with the snow.  Reach as far to the outside of the turn with your outside pole as you can.  In this picture it's my left arm/pole I'm reaching with.  The further you reach, the more you angulate.

 

Level Poles - Poles remain perpendicular to the torso.  You keep the poles level to the snow by keeping your torso upright.  Letting the torso tip while keeping the poles level to the snow by moving the hands and arms is a drill execution failure.  

 

Schlopy - Outside hand placed on hip, pushes pelvis into the turn, in this picture I'm pushing my pelvis to the right of my skis.  Inside hand and arm are held high and pushed forward, bringing the entire right side of your body forward with them.  This drill introduces something called counter, which is the turning of the pelvis towards the outside of the turn, which helps a skier angulate more strongly, and other good things.

 

All these drills are explained in detail, with slow motion video, and are introduce at a strategic point in the learning cycle, in my Building Blocks DVD instructional series.

 

Nice drill demo stills. There is no substitute for good photography and great demos that only a very good skier can provide. 

post #223 of 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

Your outside hand is leading the show. It means you've brought it around, this turns the pelvis in and you loose edge on the outside. Going into the next turn you'll have to move that much further also, probably swinging the other arm.

You may have just gotten used to this way  since the break in your leg? Using that outside arm to crank the turn around.

Hopefully, now that your alignment has been addressed you can loose this habit.

 

Lead with the inside hand, stop Heismaning the outside hand for the pole plant. (Like the trophy)


Haven't read the rest of the posts but I can agree with TOG cause he's TOG.  I would add though that with the fact the snow looks very soft and bermable (able to make a berm) haha, and your age (meaning we get a bit stiffer with a bit less range of motion in our joints) that this technique is not bad at all!  The snow conditions permit a bit more banking where the hips are more aligned than angulated.  I would love to see the transition to see how you handled it?  If in the transition the shoulders leveled out and we saw more angulation through the finish, I would say bravo!  But I really don't know Squat and many times wrong so...

post #224 of 225
Thread Starter 

In addition to the problems in the  pic I could not control my speed.It was not a problem as I loved hyper speed and I was carving beautifully, thin lines in the snow, but I had to match the green or blue to my style and find the right run. I had taken a break from skiing for several years and this is where I was at and did not know I had a problem except for skiing out of a class on a blue because I could not control my speed. I went to Sunday River because they had a super deal on lessons. It only required about two hours to adjust my hip for angulation and let the skis pass over me. All of a sudden my speed was absolutely control-able and I could ski at any speed I wanted to. I did not know what I lost until I posted this pic. I lost a little of my Austrian feed together style but more to come after additional lessons this year. As soon as the season starts I will post more pics.

Thanks for your input.

Fred

post #225 of 225
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

Your outside hand is leading the show. It means you've brought it around, this turns the pelvis in and you loose edge on the outside. Going into the next turn you'll have to move that much further also, probably swinging the other arm.

You may have just gotten used to this way  since the break in your leg? Using that outside arm to crank the turn around.

Hopefully, now that your alignment has been addressed you can loose this habit.

 

Lead with the inside hand, stop Heismaning the outside hand for the pole plant. (Like the trophy)


Haven't read the rest of the posts but I can agree with TOG cause he's TOG.  I would add though that with the fact the snow looks very soft and bermable (able to make a berm) haha, and your age (meaning we get a bit stiffer with a bit less range of motion in our joints) that this technique is not bad at all!  The snow conditions permit a bit more banking where the hips are more aligned than angulated.  I would love to see the transition to see how you handled it?  If in the transition the shoulders leveled out and we saw more angulation through the finish, I would say bravo!  But I really don't know Squat and many times wrong so...

Thank Bud, wish you were not so far away!

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