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Need new binding advice

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I've had 2 binding release failures this past winter. First one was with Marker bindings that were on a pair of demo 2014 Bushwackers. The bindings were adjusted by the demo shop rep at the ski resort. They adjusted the bindings while I was standing in the bindings. He set the bindings at 6.5.  The bindings failed when I fell in chopped up powder. One ski got buried in the powder when I tried to turn. The right ski never released. I wasn't going fast.

 

The second failure was with my 4yr old Volkl  TigerShark skis.  A ski tip got stuck in a frozen rut, then the ski tail went straight up with me going forward and the binding never released. I wasn't going fast. These bindings were adjusted by a ski resort technician. he set the bindings at 6 after I told him that when set at 5 the bindings would pre-release when I skied steep crud.

 

Both times my right ankle was twisted. I don't trust the Markers anymore.

 

I'm an intermediate skier who skis every thing except trees but I don't ski fast.

 

So I bought a new pair of skis and need to buy bindings. Look Pivot bindings were recommended to me by a ski shop techie. He said while I don't need a high end BIN setting binding, the Pivot binding will provide better release protection than the Markers.

 

Is he correct? I don't fully trust shop techies anymore.

 

The new skis are Faction Prodigy . Demoed these skis twice , once in chopped up powder and once on Eastern hardpack. The skis are amazing. In the chopped up powder it was like riding in a Cadillac, and on the hardpack were easy to tip on edge and carve.

post #2 of 9

In racing I have had similar issues over the last couple of years and I will steer clear of Marker for now. They make some great bindings, but lately I been hearing this from more and more people and a few years back had pre-releases during a race out of know where!   Axial Rossignol Bindings have been good so far and I have 2 pairs of Skis with Look Pivots which I like. I need to buy a pair of Bindings and looking at another pair of Look Pivot 14s as they are very reliable as you need bindings to be! 

post #3 of 9
So based on your idea of how you ski, is that true ?

Have you gained weight since the Tigersharks were set up ?

May be your putting more pressure on the ski then you think ?

Did you tell the shop tech youra level 2 or level 3 skier for the Din setting ?

Here's my pre-release story.

On my AC40's early season on firm snow one ski came off I went forward into a uphill rise and broke my left collar bone in 4 places. Din's set at 8.5 I selected level 3+.

8 weeks later first day back on skis, 24" of snow, on my Gotama's, Din's at 8.5. making the same turn shape, the same ski came off. While I'm in the air, I remember what the Dr said, "don't fall on it". So I twist so I land on my right side. Got up, put the skis back on. Went to the bottom and turned the Din's up to 9.5.

Seem's I gained a few pounds over the months. I have not had a pre-release since. When I check my current stat's on the Din chart, yep, 9.5 is where I should be.
post #4 of 9

None of what you are experiencing should be blamed on failure . To blame this on Marker is funny to me. Bindings only release in certain directions. Toes go side to side Heels up.  The binding did what it was suppose to do (hold you in) and you call it failure. A binding won't release in every fall that might put some stress on your body, no matter what company it is from. The Pivots are great bindings. They have some of the most elastic bindings in the game. No safer, but they require more movement by the boot to exit the binding. So for your concerns I would say that is the exact opposite of what you are looking for. My advice is to ski. You will crash, if the right pressure is exerted in the right direction your binding will release if not well then your ski will stay on. People still get knee injuries and will continue to do so. No magic fix.        

post #5 of 9

While pressure required to release the binding is similar for different brands, the mechanics of the pivot points are different.  This causes different bindings to release differently for the same DIN settings.

 

I remember when I was a lot younger going from my Tyrolia 360D's to Marker M48 Racings  I had to up the DIN setting, from 8 to as high as they would go on the Markers to stop from popping the toe (dam biometric toe, stopped that sitting back and hanging in on the toes skiing).

 

Once I figured out what I was doing, the DIN came back down to reasonable levels.

 

Currently I ski Look PX15's and another set of Markers on my SL skis.  Both have the same DIN and both hold me as required.  I had a set of PX14's and those I popped on the toes for the same DIN settings as the PX14's.  PX15 and PX14 toes are different and have a different release mechanism.

post #6 of 9

As all have said above, your two  experiences, probably, are  not related to the design or functionality of Marker bindings.

 

As you are seeking new bindings, consider the new Solomon sth 2's. @Philpug mounted a pair on my new skis, and, I've been very pleased with their performance. Most bindings discussions generally conclude there is little performance difference among the major brands. One aspect of bindings that's not discussed much is how easy they are to put on and take off, the Seh 2's are great in this respect as the heel piece design is simple. It's not much of an issue when on flat ground, but, on the hill, simplicity and ease are very good binding differentiating aspects. Look pivot heels can be a PITA to get back on after a fall, I'm also not a fan of the Look PX heel release requires pushing the pole at a weird angle with a fair amount of force.

 

Philpug did a great review of these bindings here:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/119404/preview-review-2014-salomon-sth2-binding-series 


Edited by Living Proof - 4/17/14 at 8:04am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTCold View Post
 

I've had 2 binding release failures this past winter. First one the bindings failed when I fell in chopped up powder. One ski got buried in the powder when I tried to turn. The right ski never released. I wasn't going fast.

 

The second failure was with a ski tip that got stuck in a frozen rut, then the ski tail went straight up with me going forward and the binding never released. I wasn't going fast. These bindings were adjusted by a ski resort technician. he set the bindings at 6 after I told him that when set at 5 the bindings would pre-release when I skied steep crud.

 

Both times my right ankle was twisted. I don't trust the Markers anymore.

Reading this, I can imagine imagine how you had these issues and IMO, they were not necessarily the fault of the bindings.  Remember, you need to set the DIN so they stay on when you are putting more stress on the binding (like in steep crud).  Then in a situation where you are going slow, they most likely will not come off due to the lack of stress in a slow fall.  It is commonly commented on how slow twisting falls can create issues/injuries, as the bindings are not releasing.

My solution?  Ski faster with the correct DIN:snowfight

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post
 

Reading this, I can imagine imagine how you had these issues and IMO, they were not necessarily the fault of the bindings.  Remember, you need to set the DIN so they stay on when you are putting more stress on the binding (like in steep crud).  Then in a situation where you are going slow, they most likely will not come off due to the lack of stress in a slow fall.  It is commonly commented on how slow twisting falls can create issues/injuries, as the bindings are not releasing.

My solution?  Ski faster with the correct DIN:snowfight

+1

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTCold View Post
 

 The bindings failed when I fell in chopped up powder. One ski got buried in the powder when I tried to turn. The right ski never released. I wasn't going fast.

 

The second failure was with my 4yr old Volkl  TigerShark skis.  A ski tip got stuck in a frozen rut, then the ski tail went straight up with me going forward and the binding never released. I wasn't going fast. These bindings were adjusted by a ski resort technician. he set the bindings at 6 after I told him that when set at 5 the bindings would pre-release when I skied steep crud.

 

Both times my right ankle was twisted. I don't trust the Markers anymore.

 

Most bindings aren't designed to release in SLOW twisting falls... because that is also the direction of pressure where your DON'T want a ski to release when going fast mid apex of a turn.  It is quick, jarring forces that should cause a ski to release.  Is it possible to get hurt because of this design?  Yes, but it is also possible to hit the woods and rocks going very fast if your ski twists off while cranking on it intentionally.  Knee bindings attempt to address the slow twisting fall scenarios from a different perspective... Oh dear GAWD did I just say "knee binding"?:duck: 

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