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Volkl AC50

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I have been skiing the 2010 Volkl AC50 for a couple of years and love the ski. It is time for an upgrade and I am hoping for some input. I like the all mountain feel of this ski and its california crude spring skiing ease. But I am not a fan of how heavy and stiff it is. So I am looking for an all mountain ski say 70% on and 30% off  Piste that is lighter and more flexible and in a perfect world has the capability for a smaller turn radius as the AC50 sucks in the moguls. I am not sure if my perfect ski is out there but your input would be appreciated. I was thinking of the DPS Wailer 99 Pure 3 but these are $$. any thoughts?

post #2 of 21

Volkl Kendo, go pick a pair up, you'll be amazed at how light they are, then ski them, you'll be glad you did. This is really that simple.

 

You'll ask yourself why did I spend so long on those tanks.

 

www.skiessentials.com has them with bindings for like $480 at checkout.

post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kraigy View Post
 

I have been skiing the 2010 Volkl AC50 for a couple of years and love the ski. It is time for an upgrade and I am hoping for some input. I like the all mountain feel of this ski and its california crude spring skiing ease.............. I was thinking of the DPS Wailer 99 Pure 3 but these are $$. any thoughts?

Chalk and cheese. A bulldozer verses a light finesse ski.  And you can get the DPS skis in non-Pure form i.e. without the carbon for a lot less.

 

My recommendation, something like the Stockli Stormrider 95 would make a great all round ski.

post #4 of 21
Volkl kendo stable at the highest speed possible go through bumps cut
crud cut up snow fabulous stable ski easy to turn short or long , light as a feather
post #5 of 21

+3 on the Kendo.   AC30/Mantra used to be my quiver, and the Kendo replaced both those splitting the difference perfectly.  I never liked the AC50 as it was just too stiff.  I love the Kendo in bumps, but it's a stiffer ski so many don't... but you are coming off the AC50 so you'll be fine.

post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kraigy View Post
 

... I am looking for an all mountain ski say 70% on and 30% off  Piste ... the AC50 sucks in the moguls ... I was thinking of the DPS Wailer 99 Pure 3 but these are $$. any thoughts?

 

You're coming off a heavily-cambered, tank of a ski that is focused on being stiff in the face of adversity.  It has a lot of grip, and it busts crud with ease, but it prefers to be driven hard and isn't friendly in a lot of ways, especially in bumps.  The AC50 is out towards the edge in terms of design; it's stiff and has a lot of camber for an all mountain ski.  Was I you I'd spend some time demoing the newer models before making a decision.  Your old ski was particular in terms of it's design, you've gotten used to it over the years, and you should take care with your next choice.  Demo if you can.

 

The Wailer is not really going to replace your AC50s.  They're terrific skis, but any dps ski you care to mention is going to feel very different to your old Volkls.  There are a lot of differences in materials and layup and you may (or may not) like the different feel.

 

Personally I'm looking forward to more time on dps' skis before I make a call.  I don't dislike them, but they do feel different to any skis I've been on previously.  It's an analog v's digital thing; the carbon (and perhaps the stringers in the Pure3 layup) makes them feel different to most other skis.  I've sat at the dps demo tent watching people come back in with grins on their face and beaming with delight.  I've also watched people shake their head and hand skis back with relief.  End result ... I wouldn't buy a dps ski without demoing them first.  

 

In fact the same can be said for just about every new ski, especially the new RTM Volkls.  Demo before you drop a lot of money on a new ski.  That's my best advice.

 

The newer RTM Volkls have a completely different profile in terms of the camber.  They're worth a try, but don't buy a pair expecting them to be an evolution of the AC50.  There's a bit of "right turn Clyde" in the RTMs - they're taking Volkl's all mountain skis in a different direction. 

 

Max Capacity is on target.  The Kendo is actually a very good option as a 70:30 ski.  It has similar dimensions to the AC50, although in a more rounded package ... lots of "ski of the year" gongs. The other ski that leaps to mind is the Kastle MX88.  It's fully cambered, which is getting to be a rarity in the high-80s waist range, and they should have won a lot of "ski of the year" gongs themselves.  

 

Demo the MX88 as soon as you can, then buy a pair.  That's my personal pick, although they're a lot of $$$ brand new (hint: demo one then buy one second hand).  

 

Another option is the Elan Amphibio 88xti, which is a rocking ski that does it all.  Read up on those though as the Amphibio treatment is really unique.  

 

Other skis in that space (carving bias, mid-to-high-80s-through-to-90mm) are the Blizzard Magnum 8.5ti (really good skis, a little early rise at tip and tail), the Head Rev 85 Pro, the Elan 888, Rossi's Experience 88 (basalt instead of metal in the layup, early rise in both tip and tail), and Nordica's Steadfast (lighter and much more lively - no metal).

 

Way late ... bed time now.  Best of luck.

post #7 of 21

30 years on Volkls and never had to demo one. But I would agree that it is always best to demo for most people. I just bought a Tigershark 10ft 175 to add to my eastern ice only quiver. I can tell by the write ups I am going to love the ski. As you can see by my avatar I ski in the old Austrian style of feet close. With that style I do not want the ski to dictate or lock me into  the turn. That is another reason I love Volkls not to mention their famous ice grip, stability at speed and energy. 

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

30 years on Volkls and never had to demo one. But I would agree that it is always best to demo for most people. I just bought a Tigershark 10ft 175 to add to my eastern ice only quiver. I can tell by the write ups I am going to love the ski. As you can see by my avatar I ski in the old Austrian style of feet close. With that style I do not want the ski to dictate or lock me into  the turn. That is another reason I love Volkls not to mention their famous ice grip, stability at speed and energy. 

That was last century when they still made wood cores with trees from their own forest. Before they started making some in China, before they started getting wacky when they had a successful ski and changed it.

Kendo sounds like a good choice. Bridge if you want soft. There were few people who liked the AC 50. It continued the new Volkl predilection of making a ski too stiff.

post #9 of 21
Thanks for bringing me into this century. I knew that they milled their wood from their forest but I never would have believed that they build skis in China. If I am buying upper level skis, kendo, tigershark, and racing am I still getting wet wrap torsion box construction with quality wood?
post #10 of 21
Tog, you are very knowledgeable and I appreciate all your posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

 
30 years on Volkls and never had to demo one. But I would agree that it is always best to demo for most people. I just bought a Tigershark 10ft 175 to add to my eastern ice only quiver. I can tell by the write ups I am going to love the ski. As you can see by my avatar I ski in the old Austrian style of feet close. With that style I do not want the ski to dictate or lock me into  the turn. That is another reason I love Volkls not to mention their famous ice grip, stability at speed and energy. 
That was last century when they still made wood cores with trees from their own forest. Before they started making some in China, before they started getting wacky when they had a successful ski and changed it.
Kendo sounds like a good choice. Bridge if you want soft. There were few people who liked the AC 50. It continued the new Volkl predilection of making a ski too stiff.
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Thanks for bringing me into this century. I knew that they milled their wood from their forest but I never would have believed that they build skis in China. If I am buying upper level skis, kendo, tigershark, and racing am I still getting wet wrap torsion box construction with quality wood?

The Tigershark is anything but. Fairly complex construction. Wood core but with a steel cap i believe. I skied it a little and actually liked it. The 10ft. Especially the one with the Power switch. Much better than the Ac50 The 30 was a decent but exceptionally boring ski that worked all over but not for high level skiers. . Still, skis like that will have a different feel that some just don't like. It's different than a full laminate ski. Atomic had their Beta Tubes for years and lots of people seemed to like them. I never liked the feel.

I think the Tigershark was an effort to give the best of both worlds and was pretty successful.

 

Seems like in general we're back to laminate constructions. I suspect that in the end, they may actually be less expensive to produce if one takes the full cycle into account including tooling and rejects, but I don't know.

 

Funny you mention the Tiger Sharks. I just saw last week a friend's well used Tigershark where the tail literally broke but was still attached. The broken part wouldn't  bend up though, just down towards the base so he kept skiing it.

post #12 of 21
interesting can't wait to ski it hope it lives up to the vokl mantra
post #13 of 21

Most of the Volkls these days as far as I know are made in Germany. In Straubing.

http://www.volkl.com/company/concern/factory-tour.html

 

Here's a poor quality video in German of the Plant:

http://youtu.be/xmtZ-uCKwaQ

post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all of the great responses! Your time and knowledge are appreciated. I am headed up to Squaw this weekend and I am going to try the Volkl and The Kastle as suggested. Unfortunately they don't have DPS demo's. Anybody know anyplace in north or south shore that does? Also I am skiing 184's now and was contemplating going down to 177's. I am 6'1 @ 235 Lbs. Is that going to short?

post #15 of 21
Try both but if you are a good skier, 184. Volkls work better for heavier skiers
Edited by levy1 - 4/15/14 at 11:31am
post #16 of 21
Agree 184 with the new rocker or early rise tips. You'll be fine.
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 

I will try out both sizes. I am trying to go as short as possible as I have a jacked up knee and I would assume the shorter ski would take some stress off of it. I would also assume that a shorter ski would have more chatter on the grooms and less float on powder. Correct?

post #18 of 21
At your weight you're going to work harder on the shorter ski
post #19 of 21

Float in powder and the ski your looking for are two different things.

 

Along with my 3 year old Kendo's and 4 year old Gotama's, I just bought Volkl Shiro's 119mm waist for powder.  That's the 2012 ski I got for $270 shipped  new in the wrapper.

 

I had a great time on them the past weekends in the spring crud at Okemo VT.

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kraigy View Post
 

I am looking for an all mountain ski say 70% on and 30% off  Piste that is lighter and more flexible and in a perfect world has the capability for a smaller turn radius as the AC50 sucks in the moguls. I am not sure if my perfect ski is out there but your input would be appreciated. 

I don't know that your perfect ski exists but the Nordica Steadfast, 90mm waist, is definitely lighter than the AC50, in fact my 170cm Steadfasts are lighter than my old 161cm Volkl Supersport Allstars.  The Steadfast has an early rise tip and turned up tail, but not a twin tip.  It has terrific edge grip and plenty of rebound.  It's been my daily driver for three seasons and I ski it all over the mountain at Red Lodge, but mostly I ski off-piste; trees, bumps, powder.  But when I have to get on a groomer to get back to a lift, it's a lot of fun carving high speed turns.  The Steadfast is being discontinued after this season(boo) so you might be able to find some good deals.  But, try it first.  The Steadfasts are the only Nordica skis I own 

post #21 of 21

if you can ski the AC50 well and liked them you will find almost all the skis mentioned will be a lot less demanding.

I was on the AC50 but also liked them in the bumps (contrary to most) other than my ski partner who chose them for that as well.

But suggest trying the Kastle Mx98 in a 184 I thought it was similar for input/response not nearly as powerful but lighter/floatier still easy enough in bumps and won't wear you out as fast.

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