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Some MA for my wife!

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

So this is only my wife's second season ever skiing, and I think shes progressed like crazy for having only skied 2 years. Shes in a bit of an intermediate rut right now sow to say and we are heading to the mountains for 4 days tomorrow and I would love to have some pointers and even better, some drills she could do to work on her skiing a bit. This video was taken by a friend of ours so ignore the text etc, just focus on her skiing.

 

Thanks so much guys!!

 

 

 

post #2 of 21

Just checking before responding........

 

1. Does she know you posted this video?

2. Does she want pointers, or is she happy with her skiing as it is now?

3. Will she be reading this thread herself, or will you be passing along the information?

4. Is there a specific goal you have in mind, such as her accompanying you on terrain that she's not currently comfortable on, or carving?

5. Did you teach her to ski?  

6. The tilte of the video is "carving lesson."  Is that you as the teacher?

 

There are reasons I'm asking.

Welcome to Epicski!

post #3 of 21

Take her to the ski school the first morning and sign her up for the morning session . Feed her after and go ski together. On the third day do it again. If she is game do it for the first three mornings and play together the last. She looks happy ,has some good balance and would be a fun student to teach

 

She will improve quickly and you get the fun of seeing the results. Get live help. The internet is good to get stuff to consider or work on but nothing will be better for her now than good, live help..

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Just checking before responding........

 

1. Does she know you posted this video?

2. Does she want pointers, or is she happy with her skiing as it is now?

3. Will she be reading this thread herself, or will you be passing along the information?

4. Is there a specific goal you have in mind, such as her accompanying you on terrain that she's not currently comfortable on, or carving?

5. Did you teach her to ski?  

6. The tilte of the video is "carving lesson."  Is that you as the teacher?

 

There are reasons I'm asking.

Welcome to Epicski!

All good questions.  

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Just checking before responding........

1. Does she know you posted this video?
2. Does she want pointers, or is she happy with her skiing as it is now?
3. Will she be reading this thread herself, or will you be passing along the information?
4. Is there a specific goal you have in mind, such as her accompanying you on terrain that she's not currently comfortable on, or carving?
5. Did you teach her to ski?  
6. The tilte of the video is "carving lesson."  Is that you as the teacher?

There are reasons I'm asking.
Welcome to Epicski!

1. Yes
2. She is constantly asking me for tips and pointers, I am a level 3+ skier but there's only so much I can offer not being an instructor myself.
3. She will be reading the thread
4. Her specific goals are to be able to improve in general. From my limited perspective she is not able to imitate turns with ankle flexion and linking carved turns. She would love to learn to carve and be more comfortable going faster. We ski all terrain together and has no problems except at a slower speed and obviously without perfect form
5. No, she took 12 full day lessons at vail ski school. However I try to give my 2 cents when I can to have small things to work on as she is extremely adamant about constantly improving
6. No it is a friend of ours


Why do you ask this?
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post

Take her to the ski school the first morning and sign her up for the morning session . Feed her after and go ski together. On the third day do it again. If she is game do it for the first three mornings and play together the last. She looks happy ,has some good balance and would be a fun student to teach

She will improve quickly and you get the fun of seeing the results. Get live help. The internet is good to get stuff to consider or work on but nothing will be better for her now than good, live help..


Thank you captain obvious, this was not my question

We ski every single weekend, she takes at least one lesson a month, I want to be able to give a bit of help as we'll so I can help her progress.
post #7 of 21

some general thoughts the video is not really that great.....

 

she has some decent balance and flow.....

 

first biggest problem..... 

 

her shins are slammed into the front of her boots, despite common beliefs this is actually not a good thing. get her more centered and get her to stand taller in the knees, roll her pelvis forward(Pretend she a has tail and she is tucking it in between her legs) once you get a nice centered for and aft stance on easy green terrain you can then go to step 2.

 

Step 2

 

she turn primarly by rotating her pelvis instead of her letting the seperation happen in the femur/pelvis joint. This could be contributing to the awkward stance mentioned in biggest problem. Because she is rotating her hips she can not and will not ever truly be balanced on her outside ski. Solutions are to introduce leg steering and to introduce outside to outside foot skiing. both of these go hand and hand. 

 

Think of your wife's current skiing would be the equivalent of a roller coaster car trying to rotate itself off the track unluckily for your wife skis do not have as much grip on the snow at flatter edge angles as roller coaster on its track and let her (and 10s of thousand of others) get way with upper body rotatory. Roller coasters turn from the track not from the car and my suggestion is to make that change to her skiing and start turning from the bottom up. 

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by m4doyle View Post


1. Yes
2. She is constantly asking me for tips and pointers, I am a level 3+ skier but there's only so much I can offer not being an instructor myself.
3. She will be reading the thread
4. Her specific goals are to be able to improve in general. From my limited perspective she is not able to imitate turns with ankle flexion and linking carved turns. She would love to learn to carve and be more comfortable going faster. We ski all terrain together and has no problems except at a slower speed and obviously without perfect form
5. No, she took 12 full day lessons at vail ski school. However I try to give my 2 cents when I can to have small things to work on as she is extremely adamant about constantly improving
6. No it is a friend of ours


Why do you ask this?

Because its against our policy to allow someone to post video for MA of someone who has not given their consent.  

 

Kudos to you for getting her lessons.  I'm with GarryZ though and think its usually better if the lessons come from a pro and not someone close to you.  

 

It may be a Captain Obvious comment, but its made with good intentions. 

post #9 of 21

I would recommend getting her a one or two hour private lesson with a decent instructor.  She has some issues where a dedicated private could work on tasks with her and give her assignments.  If she has been in large groups, perhaps she has not been getting all the attention she needs.  The private could help her progress much faster. 

 

There is no separation between the upper and the lower body, and indeed her upper body is often leading the legs slightly into the turn.  She is weighting primarily on her uphill ski, which is opposite of where it should be as in balanced over the downhill ski.  She is crouching, and as she settles into the turn, her stance gets even more compressed, so much so that it limits her mobility.  Her stance is often too wide, which also makes her transitions awkward, with the skis moving sequentially rather than simultaneously. 

 

Here is a simple drill, one she could practice on the flatter portions of the terrain shown in your video. 

 

Have her traverse across the slope.  Start bouncing up and down, with the movement coming from her knees and ankles opening and closing (you do not want her upper body folding up and down).  As she gets to the turn, have her continue bouncing through the turn (she can do this, it's easy).  Go back the other way and keep repeating.  Next have her bounce in the traverse.  Have her begin her turn above the fall line.  She will shift her weight onto the new outside ski (still her uphill, inside ski) and she will bounce through the turn over the new outside ski.  Repeat.  Then have her bounce into the new turn, rising off the new outside foot, but extending up slowly and settling over the outside foot into the turn in one fluid motion.  From there have her simply make turns. 

 

Then have her follow you, whereby you start making short radius turns with no break - continuous and linked.  Follow her and coach the turn where there is no pause.  Keep her moving!!

post #10 of 21
SD, respectfully, IMH experience, a lot of folks will do that drill and still follow their skis. Then you get the whole 'bouncy turn' habit ramped because it will initially feel easy, and she'll add a push off/possible stem after her lesson. Good thought, but easily misunderstood and poorly coached. She needs side slipping down and across the fall line, falling leaf on moderate terrain, and pivot slips to start a corrective progression. No 'up' movement allowed. Keep it in the boot at this level.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by m4doyle View Post

Thank you captain obvious, this was not my question
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

SD, respectfully, IMH experience, a lot of folks will do that drill and still follow their skis. Then you get the whole 'bouncy turn' habit ramped because it will initially feel easy, and she'll add a push off/possible stem after her lesson. Good thought, but easily misunderstood and poorly coached. She needs side slipping down and across the fall line, falling leaf on moderate terrain, and pivot slips to start a corrective progression. No 'up' movement allowed. Keep it in the boot at this level.

This was my first instinct to get her to side slip, pivot slip, and falling leaf
post #12 of 21

after looking at about 20 seconds of the video I would try to get some flow out of her lower joints, Ankle, knees, hip sockets. All seem to be welded shut with no real movement going on. Don't pass up any flat, or slight incline or decline terrain without trying some skating. No straight running or polling to move along the flats or to the lifts, use the feet/legs. See if she can skate on a flat section using all 4 edges of the skis not just the 2 inside edges. Try some thousand step type turns on very easy to flat green terrain. Work up to small hop turns, turning the legs more than the upper body.

post #13 of 21

MarkOJP, not intended to be the be all and end all.  Just a simple drill to get her moving.  I have found that it gets people comfortable with being active.  It also helps the body find a more natural way of standing and balancing over their skis.  I don"t expect it to create separation.  She's kind of locked into place and this drill along with shuffling, thousand steps and stepping through turns, tapping the inside ski and some others get people more relaxed on their skis and thereafter more available for more targeted teaching to occur.  When I do these things, I do them in rapid succession to disconnect the brain and let the body find its wisdom.  Corrections, but sparingly.  Then move on.

 

Also, since her husband is not an instructor, offered as something fairly simple that he could do with her.  My first recommendation to him was for her to take a private with a good instructor.  I think she is more capable than the amount of instruction she has received thus far has given her. 

 

I think your recommendations are fine, but best practiced with an instructor. 

post #14 of 21

For a second season she's doing a good job.  For improvement, I'm having similar thoughts as Josh and markojp.  

 

She needs for her legs to turn more than her upper body, so her jacket zipper is pointed more down the hill than her skis.  Repeat:  her upper body (hips, shoulders, torso, all together as a unit) needs to be facing more down the hill all the time.  Getting this to happen comes first before anything else at this point.  There are numerous drills people can do to help them feel this happening.   It's like doing the twist, only you twist below the hips - not at the waist - and you do it slowly and progressively throughout the turn.  Figuring out which drill will work is what an instructor should be able to do in a private lesson.  As Josh says, this separation of the upper and lower body is crucial if she is going to be able to ski from outside ski to outside ski, with her legs doing the work.

 

Her stance needs work.  The way I describe it is "punched-in-the-stomach" skiing.  She needs to stand up straighter, tuck that tummy in, bend forward at the ankles while keeping the heels firmly planted on the boot soles, and ski that way feeling the entire ski engaging the snow, tip and tail equally.  She'll feel stronger balance immediately.

 

Since the video calls itself a carving lesson, I want to address that.  There are several things she needs to own before she carves.  The upper body/lower body separation comes first, along with the stance issue.  But she also needs to focus some attention on how she initiates her turns if she's going to move up the skill ladder.  That's why people are mentioning sideslips, falling leaf, and pivot slips.  Those are all drills targeting initiations of steered turns.  Most skiers learn to steer their turns before learning to carve, unless they go through seasonal programs in race training.   

 

I second the advice to get her a private lesson with a seasoned and well-respected instructor.   


Edited by LiquidFeet - 4/11/14 at 8:42pm
post #15 of 21

Weight often follows a skiers eyes and or hands.  If she were to carry her hands higher (within her field of vision) her stance and balance might improve quickly.  

 

There is other stuff that could be worked on, but one step at a time.  

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by m4doyle View Post


Thank you captain obvious, this was not my question

We ski every single weekend, she takes at least one lesson a month, I want to be able to give a bit of help as we'll so I can help her progress.

You're welcome. She has just begun ,some direction would be good for her . Why drag into her mind a smorgasboard of things to work on from well meaning internet friends when some basic principles can help  her tremendously.? 

post #17 of 21
Step 1. Narrow her stance.

Step 2. She starts her turns by upper body rotation. This will limit her in shorter turns, steeper terrain, and more difficult surface conditions. In the lessons she has already taken she will have been taught one or more ways to start turns with actions of the feet. Work on making this her workhorse default way of turning. (Since she was taking a carving lesson, best to focus on edging rather than rotary foot movements.)

Step 3. Go old school for a while. Ski with weight dominantly or exclusively on the outside ski. This will enhance her balance and generate more ski performance.
post #18 of 21

Here is a drill to help her get her stance more upright, which she very much needs to do.  In her present stance, her hips are often well behind her feet, putting her center of mass behind the feet.  She may want to start this on very gentle terrain, but should be able to do this on the kind of slope shown in the video. 

 

Have her take her poles and place them horizontally behind her back.  Wrap both arms around the poles at the elbow, and bring the hands forward.  Maintain this position as she skis.

 

This has the effect of forcing her upper body into a more upright position.  Several good things occur.  First, her shoulder and head have moved forward.  More importantly, the now taller stance moves her hips considerably forward, bringing  the COM more over the feet.  This allows her to "stack" the skeleton.  It will also make the fronts of her thighs more vertical, and gets rid of the too compressed stance that limits her mobility now.  She will find this changed stance more stable and secure because she is more centered over her skis.

 

I think I would practice this before going to the pivot slips, side slips, and falling leaves.  She needs to do these things to create the separation others are talking about, and they are right to emphasize it.  The taller, more centered stance that comes from this drill will allow her to be more effective and have more success with those drills.

 

Does your wife like to dance?  Skiing is like dancing.  Get some rhythm going.  Find the groove and move in free skiing.  I can see that she is trying very hard to do things "right".   Relax and play.  Dance with the mountain.  Dancing is about moving with feeling.  Ski with feeling and the flow will come. 

post #19 of 21

this post is meant more of critique of the MAers not the OP, the OP can just skip reading it.

 

everyone of you guys is able to pick out that she is "back" and that is she is " on her inside ski" . Yes you are right but the fix is getting the femur to seperate from the rest of the body. This is so VERY important. Centifugual forces brings the skiers forward and outside when the skis are turning underneath of them.There is no way around this.  My fears are this that even some of hte most well respected instructors miss this point and would try to fix the symptom and not the cause.

 

learn to seperate the femur from the pelvis bone. 

 

Come to stowe and I ll coach her personally 

post #20 of 21
We're on the same page, Josh. Until there's some separation, every other fix isn't going to be particularly relevant.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much everyone!!
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