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A day in King Ravine... (Mount Adams, NH) - Page 4

post #91 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

 

 

Perhaps he's being hard headed.  

 

No.  He a frickin' arrogant know-it-all attention whore who can't take an ounce of criticism.  Oh - and he's also the smartest person on the internet.

 

Not sure if he could have splashed his "little adventure" into any other corners of the web.  Egomaniac.  "ME, ME, ME!!!!"  Idiot.

post #92 of 104

Stupid is for ever.....:D

post #93 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
 

Man, it was not fun this time around...

 

http://www.wmur.com/news/man-survives-mt-adams-fall-7hour-crawl-through-snow/25402494

 

http://www.unionleader.com/article/20140409/NEWS07/140409153

 

Red X's mark start and stop of the fall, red line marks the line I was planning on skiing.

*

 

 

 

The worst part of it all...

 

 

 

*


I was impressed by that line totally then I abruptly inhaled when i saw the helmet then I felt so bad for you when I saw your picture.  Then I looked back up to the part where you said it wasn't a line skied but a fall.  I am so impressed by your efforts, tribulations and your brilliant efforts to get back to help.  Please keep on skiing and don't become timid.  If you need to post a topic of recovering nerve after a bad crash and conquering fear.  

I had a terrible accident at Snowshoe going little fast on a green run and caught an edge.  I slammed my head so hard that I would probably have died about ten hours later but I had a dirt bike helmet which laughed off the boom when my head hit.  The accident was so bad two Snowboarders talking up the slope a little suddenly went absolutely silent at what they had just seen.  Your accident was much worse I respect you totally.  Im now about to read the newspaper article.

post #94 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post
 


I was impressed by that line totally then I abruptly inhaled when i saw the helmet then I felt so bad for you when I saw your picture.  Then I looked back up to the part where you said it wasn't a line skied but a fall.  I am so impressed by your efforts, tribulations and your brilliant efforts to get back to help.  Please keep on skiing and don't become timid.  If you need to post a topic of recovering nerve after a bad crash and conquering fear.  

I had a terrible accident at Snowshoe going little fast on a green run and caught an edge.  I slammed my head so hard that I would probably have died about ten hours later but I had a dirt bike helmet which laughed off the boom when my head hit.  The accident was so bad two Snowboarders talking up the slope a little suddenly went absolutely silent at what they had just seen.  Your accident was much worse I respect you totally.  Im now about to read the newspaper article.


I'm so impressed that you crawled for 7 hours.  How did you do that.  I guess you didn't have a choice

Please don't go alone anymore

post #95 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post


I'm so impressed that you crawled for 7 hours.  How did you do that.  I guess you didn't have a choice
Please don't go alone anymore

In all seriousness, there is very little to be impressed with in this person's story. He made a series of absolutely terrible choices. That happens, but he has refused to learn anything from his mistakes.

Unfortunately, I have little doubt this individual will end up as a headline "Local skier dies in...." That's typically the result when someone has no idea what they're doing in the backcountry but refuses to listen to any advice.
post #96 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post


In all seriousness, there is very little to be impressed with in this person's story. He made a series of absolutely terrible choices. That happens, but he has refused to learn anything from his mistakes.

Unfortunately, I have little doubt this individual will end up as a headline "Local skier dies in...." That's typically the result when someone has no idea what they're doing in the backcountry but refuses to listen to any advice.


Thats' a good point but I admire his spirit.

I never go anywhere without a one-on-one instructor.

I would never go into any back country and especially not alone.

post #97 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post


In all seriousness, there is very little to be impressed with in this person's story. He made a series of absolutely terrible choices. That happens, but he has refused to learn anything from his mistakes.

Unfortunately, I have little doubt this individual will end up as a headline "Local skier dies in...." That's typically the result when someone has no idea what they're doing in the backcountry but refuses to listen to any advice.


I am reading this post again and am thinking and wondering how many people go through the gate into back country by themselves.  Seems like a lot of the time it turns National Park wilderness.  Then they take a wrong turn, get lost and all that.  I studied a lot of wilderness survival techniques for a decade.  I used to fancy myself as somewhat proficient.  When reality of possible situations set in, I realized I don't want to be any survival situation and I should be vigilant not to end up in any survival situation.  How am I supposed to survive over night stranded in the Back Country at Revelstoke or somewhere when I get really cold on the lift at Snowshoe at times?  Snowshoe does get into to the -5's or lower sometimes during the day and the wind is hauling at the top and the like.  I have looked into back country dangers as an area of interest.  I'm 47 and I will never go back there.  Also I wear either a Columbia Titanium Ominheat or a North Face with the Denali liner.  Both of which I think highly of.  However I can't sleep over night hiding in a tree well for shelter in those coats or probably any coat.

Have a good Holiday

post #98 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post
 

Stupid is for ever.....:D


I took a hit the other day.  I saw a quote from Forest Gump.  He said when smart people act stupid they're still stupid.  Although I don't put myself in deadly ski situationsI had to plead a little built guilty on that.

post #99 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
 

 

No.  He a frickin' arrogant know-it-all attention whore who can't take an ounce of criticism.  Oh - and he's also the smartest person on the internet.

 

Not sure if he could have splashed his "little adventure" into any other corners of the web.  Egomaniac.  "ME, ME, ME!!!!"  Idiot.

Maybe someone could type something to him to get him to be safer.

I wonder why his binding came off if you notice in his post.  Oh I just remembered I had a binding come off at Snowshoe while I was stopped.  Maybe he adjusted his own DIN ?

post #100 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post


In all seriousness, there is very little to be impressed with in this person's story. He made a series of absolutely terrible choices. That happens, but he has refused to learn anything from his mistakes.

Unfortunately, I have little doubt this individual will end up as a headline "Local skier dies in...." That's typically the result when someone has no idea what they're doing in the backcountry but refuses to listen to any advice.


Increasingly I am starting to realize the importance of being with an instructor.  There are multiple advantages I have been finding.  If you go with a group you could get left behind.  Then you could make a wrong turn and then its trouble.  I go one-on-one with the instructor.  Snowshoe I don't have to have a guide because I always know where I am and if I take a wrong turn it Doesn't matter because I can ski everything there.  Snowbird is way different and it would be easy for me to get lost.  East coast skiers are really naive when we go out west for the first time and don't understand the hugeness and concerns of the vast resorts out West.  They should require a 20 minute safety briefing before we receive the lift ticket.

post #101 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post


In all seriousness, there is very little to be impressed with in this person's story. He made a series of absolutely terrible choices. That happens, but he has refused to learn anything from his mistakes.

Unfortunately, I have little doubt this individual will end up as a headline "Local skier dies in...." That's typically the result when someone has no idea what they're doing in the backcountry but refuses to listen to any advice.


Ok I have been over to that guys posted discussion.  I am glad he's okay but am starting to get confused when I read that discussion.  Something is wrong over there...

post #102 of 104
I am so glad you're able to post and share the story
post #103 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I am so glad you're able to post and share the story


Oh that didn't happen to me that happened to a kid and he started a discussion about it on here.  There should be a picture of him on there.  The conversation over there is confusing.  The only person who figured out what's going on over there is one of the instructors.  I'm staying off that line I hope and have no idea what to say.  I don't even know what to say to any of the people who replied to him.

post #104 of 104

I don't know whether to laugh or cry ...... :confused

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