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A day in King Ravine... (Mount Adams, NH)

post #1 of 104
Thread Starter 

Man, it was not fun this time around...

 

http://www.wmur.com/news/man-survives-mt-adams-fall-7hour-crawl-through-snow/25402494

 

http://www.unionleader.com/article/20140409/NEWS07/140409153

 

Red X's mark start and stop of the fall, red line marks the line I was planning on skiing.

*

 

 

 

The worst part of it all...

 

 

 

*


Edited by Rise To The Top - 4/9/14 at 8:40pm
post #2 of 104
Thread Starter 
post #3 of 104

Holy shit.  What happened to your goggles during the fall?  Were you wearing skis at the time or were you still hiking / climbing?

post #4 of 104

Wow.  Did you have to get an evac?

post #5 of 104
Get that helmet mounted as a trophy! It may not look it in the picture but luck was on your side with a fall like that. Heal fast!
post #6 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

Holy shit.  What happened to your goggles during the fall?  Were you wearing skis at the time or were you still hiking / climbing?

 

They came off. I was just getting ready to drop in when a small slab let loose. Went to edge my uphill ski to prevent a slide and the binding released. Oddly enough my goggles landed right next to me. As for my skis, poles, and ice axe, they are somewhere up above the waterfall that I went over.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by St Bear View Post
 

Wow.  Did you have to get an evac?

 

Crawled 3 miles to the road. Fish and Game met me at my car with an ambulance.

post #7 of 104
I bet you won't try to do that alone again:)
post #8 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
 

 

They came off. I was just getting ready to drop in when a small slab let loose. Went to edge my uphill ski to prevent a slide and the binding released. Oddly enough my goggles landed right next to me. As for my skis, poles, and ice axe, they are somewhere up above the waterfall that I went over.

 

 

Crawled 3 miles to the road. Fish and Game met me at my car with an ambulance.

Let me repeat JayT. ........Holy Shit!

 

That's a heck of an adventure!!!

 

Any plans to go find your gear after you heal up? 

post #9 of 104

Wow, you are lucky to be alive.  Heal up fast.

post #10 of 104

Scary shit.  Maybe you can climb back up this summer and find your skis?

post #11 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
 

Scary shit.  Maybe you can climb back up this summer and find your skis?

 

I have a few people that are currently looking for my gear. They'll be back tomorrow afternoon.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

I bet you won't try to do that alone again:)

 

Being with someone wouldn't have made a difference. I actually think that had my friend decided to join me on Monday that it would have been far worse.

post #12 of 104
Yea, skiing in avalanche terrain alone is a such a good idea in the first place. A partner isn't useful at all, who needs first aid or help extracting. Hell, if you would of knocked yourself out he wouldn't be able to do anything!
post #13 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

Yea, skiing in avalanche terrain alone is a such a good idea in the first place. A partner isn't useful at all, who needs first aid or help extracting. Hell, if you would of knocked yourself out he wouldn't be able to do anything!

 

Zero avalanche danger that day. Zero. None. The slab that broke was no bigger than a 10ftx10ft sheet of light ice that formed that day from the re-freeze. If I were to have been knocked out, it would have taken a considerable time for the other person to get out then come back in with help, especially with the snowpack on the trail going up. I would have been screwed either way had I got knocked out.

post #14 of 104

Wow, glad you're ok.

That a Poc helmet? Probably a good thing you didn't have a lightweight one.

post #15 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
 

 

Zero avalanche danger that day. Zero. None. The slab that broke was no bigger than a 10ftx10ft sheet of light ice that formed that day from the re-freeze. If I were to have been knocked out, it would have taken a considerable time for the other person to get out then come back in with help, especially with the snowpack on the trail going up. I would have been screwed either way had I got knocked out.

 


You won't win the no partner argument here.  You weighed the risks and came out okay but that isn't always the case.  Having a partner with you in any wilderness scenario can often be the difference between life and death. 

post #16 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

Yea, skiing in avalanche terrain alone is a such a good idea in the first place. A partner isn't useful at all, who needs first aid or help extracting. Hell, if you would of knocked yourself out he wouldn't be able to do anything!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
 

 


You won't win the no partner argument here.  You weighed the risks and came out okay but that isn't always the case.  Having a partner with you in any wilderness scenario can often be the difference between life and death. 

The usual epic monday morning quarterbacking/mommy lecture. And he didn't start the no-partner argument--you guys did. It's up to the skier to weigh the risks, not the peanut gallery.

post #17 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

 

 

The usual epic monday morning quarterbacking/mommy lecture. And he didn't start the no-partner argument--you guys did. It's up to the skier to weigh the risks, not the peanut gallery.

 

Meh, I wasn't lecturing, just pointing out his error in thought that it didn't matter if he had a partner there or not.  I hike and ski alone and weigh the risks every time I do it too.  What happened to OP is my biggest fear when hiking/skiing alone.

post #18 of 104

Rise to the Top decided to go alone when his friends weren't available or didn't want to go.  People do that all the time.  

Its not something I would do but people do it all the time.  

 

He was hurt, and had to fight his way to safety.  I'm guessing this even will go with him in the future. 

post #19 of 104

Luckily, chicks dig scars.

post #20 of 104

Heal quickly and well!

 

no small feat to survive that one. Someone is watching over you.

 

Avy report low risk or not, we all weigh the risks as well as comfort every time we hit the slopes. Sadly today it didn't quite go your way. I'm sure there are many takeaways but mainly it should be... you have comrades here at Epic that wish you a quick recovery and more great turns..

post #21 of 104

ouch this is why I like soft forgiving snow. 

post #22 of 104

Man you are lucky.  Heal well.

post #23 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Luckily, chicks dig scars.

 

Yea, hopefully they aren't too bad though.

post #24 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Luckily, chicks dig scars.


Then you, Ms. S, would be most attracted to my heart - the inside, I mean. :rolleyes

D1

post #25 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Rise to the Top decided to go alone when his friends weren't available or didn't want to go.  People do that all the time.  

Its not something I would do but people do it all the time.  

 

He was hurt, and had to fight his way to safety.  I'm guessing this even will go with him in the future. 

True. People have been doing it for thousands of years. We used to celebrate that type of person.

He did well by letting people know where he was going.

 

It does bring up some things of what one could do to raise their odds of rescue. I think something as simple as a whistle is a very good idea. Yelling for help takes to much energy. The noise of whistle can stand out. That said, if one is in a forest with snow in the evergreen trees, sound doesn't travel very far at all. If dense, even 30 yards is pushing it for yelling. Maybe a whislte penetrates a little further.

 

An emergency strobe light would alert those to one's location quickly especially if a helicopter was deployed.

(I recall seeing cgeib handing his daughter going on a camping trip the strobe/beacon device that alerts the Air Force if activated and lands you in jail if falsely activated. Being a teen, there was massive eye rolling. :-) )

 

Waterproof matches. Fair amount of birch bark in that area for starting fire for heat and smoke to alert rescue.

 

One of those thin space blankets or something to make you visible. Esp. with the dark colored jackets that become tree bark camo favored by many.

 

The usual energy bar and water.

post #26 of 104

I have a friend from high school that goes BC mountaineering in the Tetons and other sketchy places solo more often than not and camps overnight sometimes.  He got lost earlier this season and walked in to the base camp of the search party that was being mobilized for him that his wife called for the following morning of one excursion.  Dude's taken avy courses and earned some certs and has been doing this for decades.  He just likes to go off and be alone.  But, is living proof that nobody is that good to always be safe by themselves.  He may very well die doing this stuff leaving a family behind.  FWIW, he's very well off financially and paid the ranger expenses out of his own pocket for his little mishap earlier this year.

 

I can kind of relate to the serenity experienced by being by yourself in these beautiful and inspiring places, but I'm not willing to take those risks anymore. 

post #27 of 104
So you're the nut job that I read about in the paper. And you're the ambassador to mighty Pats Peak? I did not see that one coming. Next time just come over to Wildcat and we'll get you out alive. I've been in that ravine in summer and that's some gnarly terrain. You are nuts.
post #28 of 104
WOW! Quite a tumble. Glad the adventure ended up OK!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

(I recall seeing cgeib handing his daughter going on a camping trip the strobe/beacon device that alerts the Air Force if activated and lands you in jail if falsely activated. Being a teen, there was massive eye rolling. :-) )

No longer a teen and the eyes still roll smile.gif

That would have been a PLB by ACR and near 100% likely hood it had a bunch of other things to go with it in the pack.
post #29 of 104

Congrats. Your experience made Maine Public Radio.

Right after the report of George Bush describing how former Presidents compare the size of their Presidential libraries like the way other men compare the size of.....

Suffice it to say, you had a big fall.

Heal well.

D1

post #30 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post

Congrats. Your experience made Maine Public Radio.
Right after the report of George Bush describing how former Presidents compare the size of their Presidential libraries like the way other men compare the size of.....
Suffice it to say, you had a big fall.
Heal well.
D1

Apparently it made Fox News (national) and ABC national as well. I just hope people stop showing up at my door.
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