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Powder skiing - so frustrating - Page 5

post #121 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

If someone has already covered this never mind.  I know exactly what you did because I did it a couple of years ago when my son and I were fooling around on a day with about 18" of powder.  We were ripping down a groomer and I decided to head into the powder.  The friction of the deep untracked snow was substantial, my feet slowed down but the rest of my body did not.  If the fresh is more than just a few inches, you need to slow down before you jump into the deep stuff.

 

 

Nope, you just need to roll back onto the heels for the transition from groom to soft snow.

 

Edit- and then transition back to a neutral fore-aft balance. I don't want to be caught giving somebody the idea that their problem with skiing powder is that they aren't backseat enough- enough of that garbage out there already.

post #122 of 126
Fore/aft pressure management is a major skill component of deep snow skiing.
post #123 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by mowmow View Post

Fore/aft pressure management is a major skill component of deep snow skiing.
Truth.
The side to side component is the easy part.
post #124 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

If someone has already covered this never mind.  I know exactly what you did because I did it a couple of years ago when my son and I were fooling around on a day with about 18" of powder.  We were ripping down a groomer and I decided to head into the powder.  The friction of the deep untracked snow was substantial, my feet slowed down but the rest of my body did not.  If the fresh is more than just a few inches, you need to slow down before you jump into the deep stuff.


I've sometimes found slowing down before entering the deeper snow to be counterproductive. With the necessary functional (i.e., just the right amount - not too little, not too much) tension in my legs, abs and back, I have often found it easier to drive the skis into or through deeper snow at speed.

 

Not always, though. One spectacular example involved a rather impressive storm cycle at Winter Park, Colorado, some years ago, before fat skis were common. Winter Park had received 48" overnight (yes, 4 feet - not a typo) on top of a couple of feet received in the previous three days. I was on skis that were "mid-fat" at the time - 78mm under foot. It was almost impossible to ski anything without simply grinding to a halt. Some time in the middle of the afternoon, it was still snowing hard, making visibility poor. I was skiing a moderately steep run on the Park side that had been skied up quite a bit. All those poor souls literally pushing themselves down the run had left a broken up corridor that was actually quite skiable and a lot of fun.

 

I saw what I thought was a block of unskied snow, and I thought it would be fun to blast through it. Bad idea. Remember that visibility was poor. At the last second, I realized that I was about to leave the corridor that had been skied up and there was not going to be any exit from the "block" of unskied snow. Two seconds later, I was standing still in snow up to my chest about 15 feet into snow more than 4 feet deep. The snow wasn't up to my chest because it piled up in front of me. It was just that deep.

 

I did not face plant because my body slowed down just as fast as my feet. My skis were still on my feet. It took me 15 minutes to kick my way back out to the skied portion of the run.

 

It would have been a great day for something with about, oh, 140mm under foot. And I weigh less than 170 lb.

post #125 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 
Quote:
 ... If the fresh is more than just a few inches, you need to slow down before you jump into the deep stuff.

 

Nope, you just need to roll back onto the heels for the transition from groom to soft snow.

 

Edit- and then transition back to a neutral fore-aft balance. I don't want to be caught giving somebody the idea that their problem with skiing powder is that they aren't backseat enough- enough of that garbage out there already.

 

QFT

post #126 of 126

I got Pon2oons and I'm still not pretty but it's a lot of fun. My powder is probably not your powder.

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