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Give my Soul 7 experience some perspective

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I am sitting in the Denver airport typing this after two days ripping up the trees in Blue Sky Basin and one day battling the wind a A-Basin.

This was my first time to the west and absolutely loved it. Great conditions at Vail Fri/Sat and can't really complain too much yesterday.

I rented a pair of Soul 7s for this outing (brought my own boots) and would like some feedback on what I experienced...

Me:
- 160#
- 5'9"
- No idea my numerical skiing level but I can handle most everything inside a resort well and usually prefer playing in the trees/bumps.
- Usual east coast equipment: Volkl 6* (168) and K2 Public Enemies (174ish)

What I rented:
- Soul 7s in 180

My thoughts:
- Boy are these skis light. Make my PEs feel like they are made of stone despite toting around an extra 6cm

- Woods/bumps: despite the extra width and length I feel like these pivot on a dime. Granted these trees aren't *quite* as tight as northeast trees but after 2 runs I was flying down Champagne Glade with more confidence than my PEs. In the bumps, again despite their width and length, felt livelier than the PEs and more tolerant of late afternoon sloppiness.

- Gripe: On certain more firm pitches, I would get some pretty violent chatter on edge. Tried different weighting/pressure tactics but didn't seem to help. They also seemed slightly sloppy when at speed through crap snow.


Questions:
- Were these skis the length I needed?
- How much of their awesomeness in the woods/bumps is due to rocker, soft tail, etc?
- Why might I have run into the chatter issue? Soft flex? Too lighta skier for the length? Iffy rental tune?
- If I were to buy a pair for back east, would 172 be applicable and how would the ski differently?

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 16

I have experienced no chatter on mine in any hard snow or ice conditions. I bet it is the tune.

 

Since you were having no trouble with the 180's length I would think going shorter would be a mistake.

 

Thanks for the review!

post #3 of 16

Length is a touch long, but within acceptable range. 172 would be fairly short. Chatter is partly operator - takes a while to get the hand of directional skiing on a ski like this - and partly ski design; big rockered tips don't want to catch and hold on hard snow. They're apparently are awesome in bumps and trees, others here such as Epic have mentioned this too, and their parental design was pretty wonderful there too, in all cases assuming some actual soft snow in those trees. But you might want to check out the Soul Rider, Peacemaker, and Armada TST as nice alternatives for soft snow and trees back here. 

post #4 of 16
I'm thinking for back here you may want to go 172cm but it's hard to say. Honestly I have not been on that ski yet. I would demo it in 172 before I bought it if I were you. That demo fee will be well worth it so you know for sure.

You should try it soon while the snow if spring time crud. You know the ski will be fine in deep snow, what you want to know is how it will handle heavy wet snow. That's why I just bought a Volkl Shiro.

beyond seems to have a good handle on current ski, I wonder if he knows how the Soul 7 is in spring time snow here in New England ?

My house mate that has them is having knee problems so he didn't ski his Soul 7's this past weekend.
post #5 of 16

Goodness 172 in that ski is awfully short no? That ski skis short. I'd stay 180. If you weighed like 130lbs maybe the 172.

post #6 of 16

180 without question at 5'9, 160ish.  172 in that ski would feel tiny and less stable.  I would not go that direction at all.  The Soul 7 skis very short relative to its length.

 

The Soul 7 is a very nice ski for all around western conditions and it should ride well on anything that isn't rock hard.  A little different feel that what you are coming from and it shouldn't be compared to a carver, but it does fine on typical hard pack.  I found it smooth and crisp on edge,  very good for a ski 106 wide that is biased toward soft snow. 

post #7 of 16
I ski it in 188 (6'2" 190ish). Couldn't imaging going shorter and all of my other skis are around 180. It skis very short. I've found no problems on hardpack back here in the East but truthfully I haven't had it on anything resembling boilerplate.

I like the type of terrrain you like as well. It's been great in the bumps. One drawback - 188 has been a challenge in tight eastern trees; easier glades are fine. Steeper, tighter trees runs are manageable but honestly not that fun. I knew I'd have to sacrifice something and this was it.

FWIW, I ski 180 Bushwackers in trees all the time and find that length to be no problem in most tree runs.
post #8 of 16
With rockered skis like the S7 that you should go LONG. With only a tiny bit of effective edge on the snow you can go long and still do well on hard snow. Since they are so easy to turn in soft snow it won't make them slow turning.

This assumes western conditions of course.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Since most of my skiing will be done on the easy coast I've been doing some reading on rockered ski choices (the Soul 7s were my first experience on rocker).

A few skis that seem to have good EC applicability:

Moment PB&J
Rossi Scimitar and/or Sickle (pretty wide)
The ubiquitous S3s
Aforementioned TSTs

Any I am blatantly missing?

The SFBs and Cochises seem like nice skis but perhaps a bit much for the east.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEMatt View Post

Since most of my skiing will be done on the easy coast I've been doing some reading on rockered ski choices (the Soul 7s were my first experience on rocker).

A few skis that seem to have good EC applicability:

Moment PB&J
Rossi Scimitar and/or Sickle (pretty wide)
The ubiquitous S3s
Aforementioned TSTs

Any I am blatantly missing?

The SFBs and Cochises seem like nice skis but perhaps a bit much for the east.

 

Your entire list consists of soft snow biased skis. Assuming that's what you are buying them for, no problem with any of them. However, your concern over harder conditions seems to suggest that you might be considering these as daily driver skis for the east. Not sure if that's the case or not but if so, then it seems to me you are barking up the wrong tree. A soft flexed, rockered ski of that general width range would generally not be the most useful tool for typical eastern conditions on a day in-day out basis. Nevertheless, if that's what you want to do, then the Soul 7 is a better choice than the others you list. OTH, if the ski in question is to be used only in certain, softer conditions.....any of them will be good.

 

SJ

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Correct these would be for new snow days. The 6*s provide groomer fun, PEs are heavy enough to get through in-between-snowfall crap and can also lay down nice tracks on the hardpack, so I am looking for something wider and surfier.

Are you saying that the Soul 7s are a better everyday driver or better soft snow ski than those listed?
post #12 of 16

If you absolutely had to use a 10X as a daily driver in the east, then the Soul is better than the others you list. It is not especially better in softer snow than the others. In fact, the TST might be the best of the bunch strictly from the perspective of snow with any significant depth and tight trees.

 

SJ

post #13 of 16

first take the cochise of your list its one of the worst eastern tree skis being listed I own it and although it coule be worse for tree/bump skiing it is nowhere near is forte its forte is charging crud at high speeds.

 

180 sounds right for that ski, the question is should you be using that ski.

 

 

IMO with the PEs already I think the Soul 7 covers a lot of eastern bases but if want something with less chatter(usually people who pivot to an edge set get chatter) try the On3p Blilly Goat, or RMU Aposotle. 

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

first take the cochise of your list its one of the worst eastern tree skis being listed I own it and although it coule be worse for tree/bump skiing it is nowhere near is forte its forte is charging crud at high speeds.

 

FWIW I totally agree. 2 1/2 sheets of metal and a 28 m radius do not make for a quick, playful ski in Eastern trees. 

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Josh. Can you offer a brief explanation of the pivot after edge set comment, vs how it should ideally work?

Pretty sure I understand what youre saying. Not sure if I do it, maybe, but I've never had chatter on other skis like the 7s before.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEMatt View Post

Josh. Can you offer a brief explanation of the pivot after edge set comment, vs how it should ideally work?

Pretty sure I understand what youre saying. Not sure if I do it, maybe, but I've never had chatter on other skis like the 7s before.

 

 

pivot to edge set....

 

Ideal most of the time is to tip the skis on edge balance on your outside ski, and either let them come around or add your own input to their driection change, either way the ski will mostly have tail following tip, and your speed control comes from shaping and skiing a slow line fast.

 

most people turn their skis so that is period in time where on top of their turn they are sliding side way and then try set an edge somewhere after the fall line, basically using the ski like blunt instrument instead of like a tool. This is not "bad" but is very inefficient when done all the time and basically kills rockered skis edge grip on any sort of harder snow surface.

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