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Rethinking PSIA's skills approach - Page 14

post #391 of 395

  Agreed. It also requires a tipping movement (ankle or knee...whatever) in addition to the flexing and a certain amount of willingness on the part of the participant. Fear is a HUGE factor! Letting oneself to move inside the new turn (toppling) is quite possibly one of the sincerest movements in all of skiing, IMO.

 

    zenny

post #392 of 395
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Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

 

 

 

Is it me, or are the turret and the flagpole more vertical than the rest of the tower? Is this architectural angulation? Seriously. Look closely.

post #393 of 395
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
....

Is it me, or are the turret and the flagpole more vertical than the rest of the tower? Is this architectural angulation? Seriously. Look closely.

 

My oh my.  Architectural angulation it is.  

 

post #394 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

 

 

 

Is it me, or are the turret and the flagpole more vertical than the rest of the tower? Is this architectural angulation? Seriously. Look closely.

Architectural inclination and angulation.

I guess they plumbed the flag pole. I think it would look better if it was not angulated.

 

Also, apparently it's been angulated in construction. All the floors aren't the same height on both sides. They attempted to compensate for early leaning.

The last stabilization was completed in 2008. Interesting. They got 19 inches of lean out. Measured at the top.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/engineering/structural/will-leaning-tower-of-pisa-fall1.htm

post #395 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Yes, exactly why flexing the new inside leg causes tipping of the ski.  They are directly related to each other.
I absolutely don't disagree, but just to qualify and clarify that a little:

The shortening of the inside leg as a result of the (I'm going to choose a different word for the sake of not furthering an argument) "participation" of the hips in edging movements is directly related to the tipping of the ski.
Not to nit pick but it did confuse me when I read it initially without that extra part. :P
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