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LINE Prophet 90

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Anybody skiing the Profhet 90 in the trees backeast?  If so what do ya think?  Is the tail a true twin tip and if so, does it get caught up at all.  Does the Matrix metal design contain enough metal for decent edgehold on "wicked fun" Eastern  boilerplate.   Im looking to fill the most important spot in a 3 ski quiver.  My frontside is an MX88.  I luv'em but find them to be a little much in the tight spots in the woods after a few hours of skiing them.  My powder ski is 98 watea, which I also like for the rare powder day that we get.   I've been using the Bushwacker lately for my tree ski,  but in the end, I don't like this ski at all, for me they feel pretty much dangerous on icy groomers, chop, and whatnot  going from glade to glade.    I was thinking upper 80's middle 90's waist, some metal but not too much,  something without too much rocker, maybe just tip rocker but not overdone.   Which I found the Flipcore to be.  Most of the time the glades around here have a fair amount of icy conditions in them.  Am I on the right track?  Thanks.

post #2 of 13

This is my daily ski.  As far as edge hold on wicked boilerplate, my ski tracker app had me at 52.6mph the other day and I didn't even feel like i was chattering or out of control.  They do have a little metal in them so will not be as soft as other skis, but they are very fun and manageable in the trees for me personally.  To compare, I thought they were a little more forgiving than my Kendos.  Just my .02

post #3 of 13
They wouldn't be my first choice for a tree ski, but they handle powder and trees OK. I skied 1-2 feet of windblown powder in the trees in on mine yesterday, and they did OK. You have to work harder than I like, and you can bury the tips easy.

if you have an 88mm ski underfoot why not look at the prophet 98, its a bit more forgiving and can still hold an edge and ski as well as the p90. Its a much better powder ski IMO.

To be fair, I like a soft surfy ski for off trail skiing, so that's where I'm coming from.
Edited by clink83 - 3/30/14 at 9:12am
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Guys thanks for the replies,  I think  I'm trying to fill the "its icy in the woods" part of the quiver.  Unfortunately, powder mostly doesn't apply.   More icy conditions.  A technical ski, something, that you can pick your way down around the icy boulders  sticking out of the mountain. It dosent  have to be great at 52.6 mph carving turns on groomers.  It just has to tolerate the occasional icy pitched DD groomer,  and then slip into the woods for a quick run down "lower rookie river"  my favorite river trail.  Basically, a ski that can rip down anything ungroomed and icy?   Much like your Kendo,  but a little tamer.   Thanks

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

Kidd, noticed ur from bean town.  What do you think of the Kendo in icy glades here at Loaf?  Thanks

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

I like the 98 Watea I have for any powder occasion we have.  However, for me, it has too much rocker in the tail,  it releases too easily on firm groomers, my guess is probably due to excessive tail rocker and lack of metal.  And, its all wood, not at all damp or stable on icy groomers.  Thanks

post #7 of 13

Have only used the Kendos at K-town and then got rid of them.  I would say that the P90 is tamer than the Kendo.  I like what clink has to say about the P98, but have never been on them myself.  What is the word with the major expansion going on at the Loaf?  I read somewhere that is going to make it the biggest ski resort in the east.  whoa.  Good luck with your purchase.  Maybe Sierra Jim can add an opinion about your tree ski.  The Line Sick Day series might be something to check out.  Described as a uni directional Bacon with firm tail and a very little tip rocker.  Come in a 95, 110, and 125 width underfoot.  I just recently got a pair of sick day 110's for my powder ski to replace my Bluehouse Districts.  I have not had a chance to use the sick days yet.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

Kidd, thanks for the reply.  I,ve got the wider Rockered Powder ski down pat.  Im using the Watea 98 for that.  What Im looking for in this part of a 3 ski quiver is the ski that lets me ski the double diamond ungroomed icy terrain found in Maine and back east.  Im thinking metal, but not too much,  I've been using a short MX88, and it works but its not really designed for this, and its much too expensive of a ski for this type of skiing. At the end of the day I need a ski that is at home picking its way down anything ungroomed, steep and icy.   I'm also thinking I really don't need too much width cause snow can be in short supply most of the season. Something without too much rocker, like the Bushwacker has.  And not too much sidecut.  Im thinking, 90 prophet or something similar.  And, yes Loaf  has expanded all the way up to the top of the next mountain.  Its called Burnt mountain, and Bracket Basin.  Its basically the neighboring mountain.  They have thinned out most of the  woods between the top of Burn't mountain and the woods between the Nordic center located off route 27.  There's been a handful of people that have done this and basically walked or snowshoe to the top and found that there isn't really any way to ski down because there isn't nearly enough snow for thorough coverage.  Most have said "they wont be doing it again, but they are glad they did it" type stuff.  Personally, I give kudos to the management for doing this however, I cant see even more than a small handful of 20 something's going out there.  However, it would sure be nice to have the appropriate ski to have for when I do get up there.  Thanks for your time. 

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by salmonsoup View Post
 

At the end of the day I need a ski that is at home picking its way down anything ungroomed, steep and icy.   I'm also thinking I really don't need too much width cause snow can be in short supply most of the season. Something without too much rocker, like the Bushwacker has. 

 

I use the Bushwacker as my 1SQ.  I'm fine with it on hardpack -- even steep and icy -- on the way to and from the trees.  OTOH, I weigh only 150 lbs.  Have you considered the Brahma, which is a Bushwacker with metal added?

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

I  Demo'd the Brahma this season and wasn't that impressed with its overall feel.  Just my opinion, doesn't mean anybody else won't like em.  All in all, I'm not sold on the amount of splay in the Flipcore design.  For me the tail releases too easily.  I like a strong tail not something that's too buttery.  Lately I've been intrigued by the Line series.  A little tip rocker, little metal, for me this might be the ticket.  I was talking to the tune shop fella yesterday on the chairlift and he loved his Line skis but said they were hard to come by, also he hasn't been on them long enough to give comment on any durability issues.    Can anybody here comment on the quality of their Line skis?  Im most interested in durability issues and what people think of their performance in icy situations.  Thanks guys.

post #11 of 13
My prophet90 has had 1 base grind in 3 seasons of use, including 1 full time season of patrolling. They are burley skis. Like most cap skis if you hit rocks or cross the tips a lot they will chip the top sheet, but other than that they are durable.

Not bad for being ran over by toboggans and thrown in the back of a snowmobile trailer eh?
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

My prophet90 has had 1 base grind in 3 seasons of use, including 1 full time season of patrolling. They are burley skis. Like most cap skis if you hit rocks or cross the tips a lot they will chip the top sheet, but other than that they are durable.

Not bad for being ran over by toboggans and thrown in the back of a snowmobile trailer eh?

i have gone the whole season (for me 20 days) in and out of trees, bumps, and groomers and i have felt that i now finally need a tune.  I agree with the burly-ness of the ski.  It really holds up for me.  Others who ski 50 days a year may feel differently.

post #13 of 13
Mine hold up fine,Three seasons 35-40 days a year. Top sheet is fine all I have done other then keeping them sharp,is sand down the tips where I got chips from whacking tips together. I do not baby my skis and they look as good as can be expected
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