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26 years, 12 of them with intensive training - to get to this point. - Page 3

post #61 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

You can easily get a job teaching skiing.  Walk into the ski school director's office now and start the talk.  Level I cert is a give-away for someone like you.  Switching from old school to current skiing will help you get to Level II.  You'll have to do that, and you'll need some good coaches to work with you to let you know when you've got it.  Since you looked at L3 mock exams, I presume you'll be going for Level III as your final goal.  Go for it, but be ready to spend lots of money on clinics too.  You don't have to lose the belly to start this whole thing.  Look at lineup at your local bump.

I wish folks would quit saying LI is a "give-away". There's more to it than just being a good skier.

A serious seeker of LIII will never make it the "final goal."
post #62 of 70
Thread Starter 

Kneale, do you know of anyone who has failed their Level 1?  I don't.  Every report both online and in person that I've every seen had 100% pass rates.

post #63 of 70
I think If you participate, are enthusiastic and have reasonable skiing skills, Level 1 is easy to pass. I have heard of a few people failing more due to due attitude and non participation versus actual skiing skills. Most people that do Level 1 are actually interested and want to learn and have a reason to want to pass. Most people are not going to pay for a 3 day clinic and do something stupid so they won't pass.
post #64 of 70

From what I've seen of people failing the CSIA level 1, failure is usually due to some gross issue with their skiing, like rotating into turns or a complete inability to re-deliver the canned lesson content (fast track to parallel).

post #65 of 70

Why not do both? Or 'psyco-cross' if you really want to beat yourself into a plowshare.  :)

post #66 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Kneale, do you know of anyone who has failed their Level 1?  I don't.  Every report both online and in person that I've every seen had 100% pass rates.

 

 

I know of someone. But they are the only person that I have ever heard about failing. I would rate their skiing at L4 at the time of the exam 

post #67 of 70

I've come to think of the L1 Exam as not so much an exam of how well you ski or can teach, but more of an "entrance" exam for L2/3.  You have demonstrated your desire and ability to learn same basic skiing and teaching skills.  You have proven to the Examiner you have this desire to learn and are motivated by about the sport and have a willingness to spend your days working with folks that can't or can barely ski to help them get better.

 

When you graduate, you shouldn't think of it as "I passed!" but "I've been accepted!"

 

Ken

post #68 of 70

PSIA Level I exam = PSIA recruitment tool.

If one prepares for it, going through the process becomes educational and worthwhile. 

At my mountain trainers and candidates do an exceptional job of preparing for the Level I exam.

post #69 of 70
Thread Starter 

"First one's free kid, after they you gotta pay."

post #70 of 70

Going back to the OP and early comments....  There's a lot of us in the same boat, started late, now in 50's, have 14 yr old kids who started young and are 10X better than we are, etc.   I agree 100% that the one thing that holds late starters back is lack of confidence.  We can all get excellent instruction, we're old and wise enough with a long enough attention span to understand the instruction on proper balance and movements of skiing - but when we get to a pitch that is steeper, more difficult terrain  or snow conditions that are just a hair past our comfort zone, it all goes to crap !  It's not an issue of not knowing the proper movements or techniques. it's a matter of having the confidence to put it into practice once we pass our comfort zone.  What I believe might be able to get us past the mid-life ski plateau is a psychologist that specializes in mid-life confidence, as opposed to more and more ski instruction.  The next time you get into terrain that is way out of your comfort zone... if you just think "How would I ski this if I had 100% confidence...than just do it ....... you'd feel like you're 14 again!

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