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Fairly Intense Pain First Two Hours Wearing Ski Boots (Instep)

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Quick question some of you might be able to answer for me...

 

I have had broken/fractured bones in each of my feet in different locations, but both along the instep. These injuries seem to have healed well, but I am getting pretty intense pain in each of my feet in different spots for the first two hours of wearing my ski boots. After two hours when the pain dissipates, I can snug up my boots completely and my feet feel great and well supported for the rest of the day.

 

The pain seems to start and be concentrated around my instep - the general vicinity where I broke each of my feet.

 

Spoke with a very good boot fitter, but he was a little perplexed because I'm able to wear the boots on a tighter setting and resume my day after the first two hours fairly intense pain and stretching. In addition, pain does increases with more demanding terrain.

 

This has my been experience for each of my 45 or so days of skiing this year, but not my experience prior to breaking my feet 5-6 years ago.

 

Even my five year old ski racer daughter is becoming increasingly difficult to keep up with. Must fix feet, must fix feet, ... lol ;)

 

Any suggestions? In Seattle if that helps in terms of referrals.

 

Thanks much!


Edited by SailSkiRun - 3/29/14 at 12:12pm
post #2 of 9

Are your liners heat molded/moldable?  Might want to bake them again to form to your newer foot shape.  Is it possible that your feet are actually going numb in the pain points and that is why they feel better after two hours?

post #3 of 9
Sounds like you're buckling them too tight and eventually your body decides to stop telling you about it. Leave the instep buckle loose enough to almost flap, tighten the next buckle up to compensate and see what that does. By the way, when you first put them on, before you get your heel in the heel pocket real good, are your toes touching the front of the liner? If not, boots might be too big.

You might also be skiing in the back seat, forcing the instep against the boot instead of your shin.
post #4 of 9

This is a guess.

 

Is it possible your boots are too big?  The reason I say this is because one of the things that happens when boots are too big is the foot slides forward which could put pressure on your instep.  Are you snow plowing behind your 5 y/o?  That could do it too.

 

I would try skiing the first couple hours exaggerating being forward.  Get your heel pressed against the back of the boot and don't let it leave that spot and take note on the pain.

 

The two hour part could also mean that it is taking your boots that long to warm up and like crgildart said, they're molding.  You would think after 45 days they would be molded though.  Could it be your feet take two hours to warm up?

 

What type of boots and liner?  Did you get them fitted and if so, have you been back to see the same fitter?

 

Ken

post #5 of 9

Do any other activities cause this pain?  Does it only happen in ski boots?

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Wow you guys are a such a great resource; I'm glad I finally posted.

Let me try to answer some of your questions:

1) when I run on an uneven surface I sometimes experience a little pain on only one foot, radiating from the same general area (outside, instep).

2) My boots are Slomon Instinct both liner and shell are moldable.

3) If I don't stop to strech my feet after 20 minutes of (fairly intense) pain, I develop a small numb spot while the rest of the painful areas rage on.

4) Yes, before my heel is locked in, my toes do touch the tip of my liner.

5) I'm definitely skiing in the back seat after the pain sets in - just to relieve pressure and stay ahead of my 5 year old. No snow plowing - that was last years news. wink.gif

I've tried keeping the instep buckle loose, but didn't think to compensate by increased tension in surrounding buckles. I've tried to warm up by skiing on less demanding terrain and gradually tightening buckles. The result is a little less pain but the same process of feet having to be stretched out and a two hours. My latest experiment is to wear them at home before going skiing. A slight improvement only.

Hope I've answered all of your questions.

Thanks again. ( or Shanks! Lol. smile.gif . Cheers.
Edited by SailSkiRun - 3/29/14 at 4:18pm
post #7 of 9
SSR,
I would find a boot fitter that is a certified CPED too.
post #8 of 9
The buckle that needs to be tight is the heel buckle, second one from top. Toe can flop. Others just slightly snug. Since your instep is tender, I'd see if you can get away with that floppy, too. If that works, then getting the boot eased a bit there might be the solution.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailSkiRun View Post

Quick question some of you might be able to answer for me...

I have had broken/fractured bones in each of my feet in different locations, but both along the instep. These injuries seem to have healed well, but I am getting pretty intense pain in each of my feet in different spots for the first two hours of wearing my ski boots. After two hours when the pain dissipates, I can snug up my boots completely and my feet feel great and well supported for the rest of the day.

The pain seems to start and be concentrated around my instep - the general vicinity where I broke each of my feet.

Spoke with a very good boot fitter, but he was a little perplexed because I'm able to wear the boots on a tighter setting and resume my day after the first two hours fairly intense pain and stretching. In addition, pain does increases with more demanding terrain.

This has my been experience for each of my 45 or so days of skiing this year, but not my experience prior to breaking my feet 5-6 years ago.

Even my five year old ski racer daughter is becoming increasingly difficult to keep up with. Must fix feet, must fix feet, ... lol wink.gif

Any suggestions? In Seattle if that helps in terms of referrals.

Thanks much!

Who are you working with currently? I'd suggest Jim Mates.
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