or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skiing in dense fog / very low visibility conditions
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Skiing in dense fog / very low visibility conditions - Page 2

post #31 of 39
I think he was soldiering on over on Chair Two, but then again, he arrived later and ultimately we separated because I wanted better snow and trees. As I mentioned, the sun came out as I walked to the car. Plus, when you're thirty you can see better than when you're sixty..

EDIT: I remember now, I wanted lunch and he didn't, then I ended up going with others after lunch.
post #32 of 39

I recently spent several days at Schweitzer. It was pretty foggy for a good portion of the time, and I didn't ski well in it at all. Something I need to work on, perhaps with my eyes closed, as Josh suggests. You would think I'd know better. I used to guide visually impaired skiers.

 

There was a member of our group who was extremely familiar with the area. At one point, he warned me that I was about to ski off a sudden drop, and that I should turn left to avoid it, which I did. I had been 3 or 4 feet away from skiing off a small cornice that I literally couldn't see, even at that distance. From a different angle, looking back at it, it was possible to distinguish it. Skiing off it unaware would have been unpleasant, to say the least.

 

To add insult, the new snow was wet and heavy, and set up into lumpy concrete almost immediately. Not that the lumps were actually visible... :eek

 

And, of course, our goggles were continually covered with fine mist. Delightful.

 

People from Seattle kept telling us how great the snow was.

post #33 of 39

Last Saturday at Alpine the top was really socked in.  Most of where we were skiing wasn't too bad, as chute walls or trees provided some contrast.  Though getting across the wide expanse of wolverine bowl messed with my head every time.

 

But getting to the goods was surreal.  @near nyquist was guiding. The path traverses along a rope line, up onto a cat track after the rope ended, and then around a side hill.  NN just took off into the milk bottle.  One time I let him get out of sight and discovered that I had stopped on the traverse without realizing it.

 

A different time at JHMR our instructor told us, "We are skiers and we like snow.  Noone is allowed to say 'I can't see anything' for the rest of the day."  But then @aveski2000 went off a fairly large dropoff, leaving both skis impaled like cocktail toothpicks in the vertical face.  (No injury.)  "That's why I told you to follow me." 

post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

Last Saturday at Alpine the top was really socked in.  Most of where we were skiing wasn't too bad, as chute walls or trees provided some contrast.  Though getting across the wide expanse of wolverine bowl messed with my head every time.

 

But getting to the goods was surreal.  @near nyquist was guiding. The path traverses along a rope line, up onto a cat track after the rope ended, and then around a side hill.  NN just took off into the milk bottle.  One time I let him get out of sight and discovered that I had stopped on the traverse without realizing it.

 

 

Sorta Like Driving With Your Eyes Closed

 

 

 

@Spooky had a tip for us at alta, use your pole as a feeler to stay on the cat track and away from the wall

 

works for me 

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

That was the whole extent of the mountain.

 



A lot of places that I ski in Europe have a majority of their terrain above tree line, so I'm pretty used to skiing with no visibility for long periods of time. The video that I linked earlier (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs84IToERPA - not my video) is fairly common stuff, at least for me. I realized that I had become fully acustomed to it when people who were skiing better than me in good visibility were skiing worse than me when the snow rolled in the next day.

I think Altanaut might have some pictures of our off-piste day in St. Anton, where we skied off the top of the Valluga in very low visibility. She and her husband took a couple of snaps from the top I think.
Edited by CerebralVortex - 4/1/14 at 3:13am
post #36 of 39
Yeah, looked at the video, counted the chairs, got about to five or six... Clear day.. At one point last week, you could not see the chair ahead of you the entire ride about 100 feet after leaving the base station. Most of the day, that was true for the last half. I reset my cut off last year to "less than two" before I started bitching.
post #37 of 39
Geesh....

1 chair viz is common at Targhee. Anything greater than 2 chair viz is considered "good".

Skiing in fog - that's what your thighs are for.

HB
Edited by HarkinBanks - 4/1/14 at 7:29am
post #38 of 39

Just kind of skimmed this sorry if this is a duplication of ideas.  

 

CV enjoyed your video, looks like home many years.  He shows you one of my best survival techniques.  

 

Just keep turning.  It keeps you from getting into a static position and a moving body adapts better to changes.  Look at the folks traversing in hid video, they are in trouble. Also notice how little you see his ski tips; looking down can cause a plethora of problems, tension being only one.

 

When you feel resistance to your ski tips turn.  You are encountering some kind of a bump use it to turn off of.  

 

Good snow and bad visibility often live in the same place. Embrace the crap.

post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

Last Saturday at Alpine the top was really socked in.  Most of where we were skiing wasn't too bad, as chute walls or trees provided some contrast.  Though getting across the wide expanse of wolverine bowl messed with my head every time.

 

But getting to the goods was surreal.  @near nyquist was guiding. The path traverses along a rope line, up onto a cat track after the rope ended, and then around a side hill.  NN just took off into the milk bottle.  One time I let him get out of sight and discovered that I had stopped on the traverse without realizing it.

 

A different time at JHMR our instructor told us, "We are skiers and we like snow.  Noone is allowed to say 'I can't see anything' for the rest of the day."  But then @aveski2000 went off a fairly large dropoff, leaving both skis impaled like cocktail toothpicks in the vertical face.  (No injury.)  "That's why I told you to follow me." 


HA! mdf, when I noticed you had mentioned me and the title of the thread, I knew you were talking about this. I think the "not being able to see" whine was a result of coming down Rendezvous Bowl in whiteout conditions. If the flagging hadn't been there I would not have known up from down. I'm quite sure I summersaulted on that double ejection. Good thing the LZ had over a foot of powder. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skiing in dense fog / very low visibility conditions