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A new practice that specializes in the treatment of Morton’s Neuroma

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Thread Starter 

A new practice that specializes in the treatment of Morton’s Neuroma:  

 

The Center for Morton’s Neuroma

 

There are many approaches to treating Morton’s neuroma, but until now it has been difficult to find all these treatments in one location.   The Center for Morton’s Neuroma, based in Framingham, Massachusetts, offers full treatment options for Morton's neuroma, from insoles and injections to ultrasound guided neuroablation procedures to surgery.  If you or someone you care about suffers from pain in your forefoot, especially with walking or wearing shoes, it may be Morton’s neuroma.  The Center for Morton’s Neuroma may help you.   See www.mortonsneuroma.com for more information.

 

 

My Story:

When I went on a ski trip with my family about eight years ago, I ended up in the ski shop because my foot hurt too much to ski.   I thought that my boot was too tight and that was causing the burning pain and tingling in my foot.   Luckily, my wife is a Pain Medicine physician and she diagnosed a Morton’s neuroma.   For every subsequent ski trip, she gave me a steroid injection into my Morton’s neuroma several days before the trip, which helped.

 

I wanted a more long lasting and permanent solution.  So, I tried more invasive treatments. Initially, I had the neuroma frozen (cryoablation therapy, which improved my pain substantially.  Finally, I just wanted to be rid of it, so I had a sclerosing agent injected into the neuroma under ultrasound guidance. After a few weeks, this procedure was repeated and since that time I have had no further foot pain.  I now get to ski with my family without any pain.

 

During my struggle with Morton’s neuroma, I did a lot of research into the condition. I could not identify a single place which offers a wide range of specialized non-surgical treatments for Morton’s neuroma where a patient like me, suffering from Morton’s neuroma, could go to receive the optimal treatment for them.

 

I insisted that my wife open the Center for Morton’s Neuroma so that people who suffer from Morton’s neuroma will be able to have a wide range of non-surgical treatment options available in one facility, performed by a board certified specialist and done under ultrasound guidance. (We  believe ultrasound guidance dramatically improves the success rate of the procedures and decreases the likelihood of complications.)

 

 

The Center for Morton’s Neuroma

See www.mortonsneuroma.com      

post #2 of 3

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post #3 of 3

So when does the West Coast branch of the clinic open?  Can't see Medicare popping for travel from California to Mass.  I've had an MN in my right foot for several years, the product of an older pair of Langes skied too long in packed-out liners.  My new K2 (Spyne 110 LV) boots are sublimely comfortable, but, after about three hours, the right foot seems to slide a bit forward out of the heel pocket and lights up the old electric-shock pain.  I've started snugging the cuff buckles and power strap back up after a warm-up hour, and that seems to help, but my dealer is still waiting for his K2 heat stacks to mold the K2/Intuition liners.  I hope molding will result in a better grip on the ankle and heel to lock the foot in place.

 

Beyond skiing (such as in golf or street shoes), I'm only slightly aware of the MN; there's a sensation, but it's sub-pain, more like a tingle.  Let my skis take a solid hit that jars them around a bit (gnarly crud, hard ruts, challenging bumps), though, and it's a cattle prod between toes 3 & 4.  I'm using OTC felt metatarsal pads in both boots, and they seem to help, but I find myself skiing off the heel pocket in the boots after a few hours.  Any steering from the forefoot triggers the MN pain.  Upside is that the K2s, which have a really comfy upright stance and excellent cuff stability, turn my Rossi E98s really well using a pretty straight leg and pressure in the heel pocket.  It even gives me more easy-flex headroom to keep the edges hooked up with soft legs when needed, rather than trying to feather from a near-squat, and it depends on a pronounced hip angulation.  Very, very solid turns.

 

I'd like to know more about permanent fixes.  I've read that some of the techniques result in permanent numbness of the toes?

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