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How do you keep ski edges from rusting during the off-season? - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

Strange this was in a similar thread at the end of last season, I must be experiencing flash backs. OMG!


No, not a LSD flash back! These type of threads magically appear at the end of every season. Actually not too bad here. On some other forums, you would think some people are trying to preserve an Egyptian Mummy instead of a ski or snowboard.:D 


Edited by CaptainKirk - 3/29/14 at 9:53am
post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainKirk View Post
 


No, not a LSD flash back! These type of threads magically appear at the end of every season. Actually not too bad here. On some other forums, you would think some people are trying to preserve and Egyptian Mummy instead of a ski or snowboard.:D

 

Skis are tools, not jewels.

 

With that said, most will tell you I'm rather fastidious when it comes to caring for my skis and where I'm willing to ski them.  I am however self medicating (beer and wine) and have twice this season skied in the trees with my amphibios.  The previous sentence has also caused me to purchase the SkiVisions kit so I can spend the summer overhauling the bases.

 

Next we'll have the thread on how to store bindings; backed off or left alone?  Shortly there after everyone will argue the optimum position for skis to be stored in; bases up, clamped together, leaning against a wall, hanging, etc.

 

It's what we do when ski season ends.  Very therapeutic.

post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
 

 

Skis are tools, not jewels.

 

With that said, most will tell you I'm rather fastidious when it comes to caring for my skis and where I'm willing to ski them.  I am however self medicating (beer and wine) and have twice this season skied in the trees with my amphibios.  The previous sentence has also caused me to purchase the SkiVisions kit so I can spend the summer overhauling the bases.

 

Next we'll have the thread on how to store bindings; backed off or left alone?  Shortly there after everyone will argue the optimum position for skis to be stored in; bases up, clamped together, leaning against a wall, hanging, etc.

 

It's what we do when ski season ends.  Very therapeutic.

Well said.

 

Skis are tools, nothing more, nothing less. Like all tools, they need some TLC, but overdoing it will not make them a better tool. I enjoy keeping my race skis running top notch, but you can get to a point where investing too much time or money has no return value.

post #34 of 55

CaptainKirk actually for this sort of "tools" your statement is not true ;) First, you can't overdo it with skis. And with more work on skis, they actually become better (faster) tool ;) Skis are a bit different tool then screwdriver for example, so result of work on them are different then results of "work" on screwdriver keeping it clean for example.

post #35 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

CaptainKirk actually for this sort of "tools" your statement is not true ;) First, you can't overdo it with skis. And with more work on skis, they actually become better (faster) tool ;) Skis are a bit different tool then screwdriver for example, so result of work on them are different then results of "work" on screwdriver keeping it clean for example.


Until you go all the way through the edges and p-tex..  Until you burn the bases..  Until you wreck your edge bevel beyond being able to flatten it up again.  You certainly can overdo it of you're not an expert at tuning..


Edited by crgildart - 3/29/14 at 11:12am
post #36 of 55
So, guessing you can't overdo waxing.
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 


Until you go all the way through the edges and p-tex..  Until you burn the bases..  Until you wreck your edge bevel beyond being able to flatten it up again.  You certainly overdo it of you're not an expert at tuning..

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

So, guessing you can't overdo waxing.

Wrong...see bolded item.

 

:beercheer:

post #38 of 55

Yeah I meant mainly waxing. And sure you can burn the bases, but that's just because you are sloppy. If you do it right, you can't burn bases even if you do 30 cycles a day... 365 days a year :)

post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainKirk View Post
 

Well said.

 

Skis are tools, nothing more, nothing less. Like all tools, they need some TLC, but overdoing it will not make them a better tool. I enjoy keeping my race skis running top notch, but you can get to a point where investing too much time or money has no return value.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

CaptainKirk actually for this sort of "tools" your statement is not true ;) First, you can't overdo it with skis. And with more work on skis, they actually become better (faster) tool ;) Skis are a bit different tool then screwdriver for example, so result of work on them are different then results of "work" on screwdriver keeping it clean for example.

 

I'm sort of on the fence on both of these statements but it might be semantics.  By overdoing it, to me that means we've reach the point of doing non value added.  I stopped making them better and have reached a plateau.  So when it comes to waxing skis, that means I'm wasting wax, time and energy.  I also agree with primoz and believe as long as you're doing the work correctly, you wont damage the skis and if you burn your bases or cause dilamination, it is because you did something wrong and not because you did it too many times :rules:.  Each time you do it you still need to do it correctly.  Same with a screwdriver.  I can clean it and sharpen it but at some point, I'm not making it better, just wasting time.  I think if primoz statement is true, that means you weren't finished with your skis.  For me, that's fine.  They already go faster than I should be allowed to ski.  I can get them faster, but why spend more time brushing them to make them faster?  If more brushing made them ski easier  or at least made me look taller and sexier, sure.  I don't think either of those will happen.

 

You can sharpen too much and that means you've shortened the skis life as long as you're doing it correctly.  I suppose there are conditions when you don't want your skis too sharp; like racing is soft wet snow, but it isn't hurting the ski, just your race time.

 

Ken

post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 


Until you go all the way through the edges and p-tex..  Until you burn the bases..  Until you wreck your edge bevel beyond being able to flatten it up again.  You certainly overdo it of you're not an expert at tuning..

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

So, guessing you can't overdo waxing.
Wrong...see bolded item.

beercheer.gif

Waxing is not the same as ironing with too hot a temp or leaving it in one spot too long. That's being sloppy. You can wax PROPERLY as much as you want.
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

Yeah I meant mainly waxing. And sure you can burn the bases, but that's just because you are sloppy. If you do it right, you can't burn bases even if you do 30 cycles a day... 365 days a year :)

Manly waxing....30 times a day.....werewolf problem?  Aren't we a little of topic :ROTF

 

Sorry the snow is really starting to melt here.

post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

CaptainKirk actually for this sort of "tools" your statement is not true ;) First, you can't overdo it with skis. And with more work on skis, they actually become better (faster) tool ;) Skis are a bit different tool then screwdriver for example, so result of work on them are different then results of "work" on screwdriver keeping it clean for example.

Waxing is fine, but even that has a point of diminishing returns. Mike DeSantis (SkiMD and former World Cup tech) has stated that only around 2% of the base material can actually retain wax. Once it is full, additional waxing is just a waste of time and money. Of course, the wax companies would like you to wax 30 times per day.:D Keeping the ski waxed, scraped, brushed, and fast is one thing, but doing that to the extreme isn't going to make the skis any faster, or last longer. Like I said, I have some skis that are 30 years old, do nothing more than keep the edges sharp with a stone, keep them waxed (but not going overboard) and they are as fast, and hold on ice as good as when they were new.

post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainKirk View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

 
CaptainKirk actually for this sort of "tools" your statement is not true wink.gif First, you can't overdo it with skis. And with more work on skis, they actually become better (faster) tool wink.gif Skis are a bit different tool then screwdriver for example, so result of work on them are different then results of "work" on screwdriver keeping it clean for example.
Waxing is fine, but even that has a point of diminishing returns. Mike DeSantis (SkiMD and former World Cup tech) has stated that only around 2% of the base material can actually retain wax. Once it is full, additional waxing is just a waste of time and money. Of course, the wax companies would like you to wax 30 times per day.biggrin.gif  Keeping the ski waxed, scraped, brushed, and fast is one thing, but doing that to the extreme isn't going to make the skis any faster, or last longer. Like I said, I have some skis that are 30 years old, do nothing more than keep the edges sharp with a stone, keep them waxed (but not going overboard) and they are as fast, and hold on ice as good as when they were new.
Work on your skis as much as you feel you need to. That depends on what kind of snow you ski on, what kind of skiing you do (dawdling around little kids? Racing? Rock skiing?), how compulsive you are, how much the benefit of one bit of ski maintenance or another matters to you (e.g. I really notice wax but most of the time can get away with just OK edges), and/or how much you need to be obsessed with skis, skiing, and everything about them.

There are some minimums, and maybe some of us need to fool with our bases so much that we need a base grind three times a season, but it's really all about what makes you happy. Once you start waxing and tuning you quickly learn what works for you; until then, take reasonable suggestions, but don't feel compelled when someone says they have the exact formula that is the only way to maintain skis that won't cause you to go to hell.
post #44 of 55

I wonder how many of the people who are so precise and picky about  how they protect their skis during off season, carry their skis unprotected on car roof racks.   Just wondering....

post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 


Until you go all the way through the edges and p-tex..  Until you burn the bases..  Until you wreck your edge bevel beyond being able to flatten it up again.  You certainly can overdo it of you're not an expert at tuning..

Note that I included the last sentence here to caveat people that leave the iron too hot, don't use proper file guides or at least tape, etc...

post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainKirk View Post
 

Waxing is fine, but even that has a point of diminishing returns. Mike DeSantis (SkiMD and former World Cup tech) has stated that only around 2% of the base material can actually retain wax. Once it is full, additional waxing is just a waste of time and money. Of course, the wax companies would like you to wax 30 times per day.:D Keeping the ski waxed, scraped, brushed, and fast is one thing, but doing that to the extreme isn't going to make the skis any faster, or last longer.

We most likely come here with different background, and on top of that, we most likely talk about different things. So let's try to get things straight :) For recreational skiing, or even Sunday racing, you are perfectly right. For big league racing (World cup for example) things are different, and that's background I'm coming from. For this sort of things, you are never done. You wax, you wax some more, and when you think you are done, you keep on waxing, then you ski those skis, you wax some more, ski skis some more, wax even more, and then after month or two, they are finally ready for racing. And after race, you keep on waxing to have them ready for next race. I know most (if any) guys here don't care about preparation for WC, but thing is, that for cases where every small detail matters, you can't overdo it. For recreational skiing, yes pretty much everything means overdoing it. And nowadays, when I'm out of this business, I'm do on my skis only maybe 10% of things I have been doing before on race skis, and even those 10% are probably overkill. But then again, it's still sort of fun to do it, so I don't mind :)

post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

We most likely come here with different background, and on top of that, we most likely talk about different things. So let's try to get things straight :) For recreational skiing, or even Sunday racing, you are perfectly right. For big league racing (World cup for example) things are different, and that's background I'm coming from. For this sort of things, you are never done. You wax, you wax some more, and when you think you are done, you keep on waxing, then you ski those skis, you wax some more, ski skis some more, wax even more, and then after month or two, they are finally ready for racing. And after race, you keep on waxing to have them ready for next race. I know most (if any) guys here don't care about preparation for WC, but thing is, that for cases where every small detail matters, you can't overdo it. For recreational skiing, yes pretty much everything means overdoing it. And nowadays, when I'm out of this business, I'm do on my skis only maybe 10% of things I have been doing before on race skis, and even those 10% are probably overkill. But then again, it's still sort of fun to do it, so I don't mind :)

No problem, I know exactly where you are coming from.

post #48 of 55

So, I had sealed up the kids skis for summer using my usual, tried and true method then mid week decided to try to ski another day today.  So, I scraped the wax and loaded up so as not to forget to scrape at the resort.  Then, forecast changed to RAIN this morning and slop mid day with gusts to 50mph so we bailed on the trip.  I may try again since the ski hill might be open Saturday, but I did try the oil method since it is just the kids' all mountain/beginner skis.  FWIW, I used the closest thing at hand and lightly rubbed some neatsfoot oil on the edges.  I figured a natural oil would help some since vegetable oil works fine for cast iron skillets.  As for it hindering wax sticking I'm not worried about that on these skis.  All moot because we may still ski them next Saturday since the notion of one more day seems popular if possible.

post #49 of 55

maybe... put skis in the ski bag...  throw some of the silica desiccant packs that you normally throw away.

 

then it can absorb excess moisture while in storage.

post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanscrazydaisy View Post
 

maybe... put skis in the ski bag...  throw some of the silica desiccant packs that you normally throw away.

 

then it can absorb excess moisture while in storage.

will not work.  there are other threads on dessicants to which I posted, but the packs that you get in your beefjerky and iphone box are not going to work for the following points:

 

#1) will only adsorb about 30% f their weight in water which is like 3-4drops of water.

#2) will be done adsorbing all they can adsorb within about 1hour when exposed to room air.

#3) disposable packs cannot be reused/recharged, since you cannot dry them out without the glues and other additves turning into black burnt goo (i've tried).

 

If you want to use silica gel, you need to actually buy some, and in large enough amount to make a difference.  it is not expensive.

Like a 40gram reusable cannisters (altoids tin size) will be like $6 and is like as much as 40 of your beefjerky packs.  These can be found online, or commonly also at camera and gun stores.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Pelican-Peli-Desiccant-Silica-Gel/dp/B005HXXATI

 

 

Or in bulk without the metal tin; you can get a couple pounds of silica gel in a flower drying kit from your hobby store for under $20

post #51 of 55
silica gel, orbital storage, vaseline....oh my
I think its time for some self medication as mentionned in an earlier post (liquid meds I believe) and put myself into storage for the season.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

will not work.  there are other threads on dessicants to which I posted, but the packs that you get in your beefjerky and iphone box are not going to work for the following points:

 

#1) will only adsorb about 30% f their weight in water which is like 3-4drops of water.

#2) will be done adsorbing all they can adsorb within about 1hour when exposed to room air.

#3) disposable packs cannot be reused/recharged, since you cannot dry them out without the glues and other additves turning into black burnt goo (i've tried).

 

If you want to use silica gel, you need to actually buy some, and in large enough amount to make a difference.  it is not expensive.

Like a 40gram reusable cannisters (altoids tin size) will be like $6 and is like as much as 40 of your beefjerky packs.  These can be found online, or commonly also at camera and gun stores.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Pelican-Peli-Desiccant-Silica-Gel/dp/B005HXXATI

 

 

Or in bulk without the metal tin; you can get a couple pounds of silica gel in a flower drying kit from your hobby store for under $20

If you throw in a ski or snowboard that is still wet or damp, then of course, it won't work, unless that is how you prep your skis for storage.

 

Usually, I would assume that one would prep it about making sure it's completely dry first, aside from the ambient room relative humidity.

post #53 of 55

If you are going to go to the dehumidifier route.  Enclosed space and one of these.

 

http://www.goldenroddehumidifiers.com/models_specifications.htm

post #54 of 55

Have had success with a thick covering of wax - we call it "summerizing" the skis.  Make sure you glopped up the edges as well as the base.  Don't skimp, don't scrape.  Cheap wax is fine.  

post #55 of 55

Nope,  Heavy coat of wax ready to scrape and brush for that first run of the next season has worked well for us.  And we were seeing light rust on edges before we started "summerizing" with a coat of wax.  First summer of owned skis stored them in basement, rusted edges.  Next season stored them in upstairs closet.  Rusted edges.  Third and subsequent summers, wax, store in basement, no rusted edges.  Midlantic, humid weather.  

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