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Where do I go next with my skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 59
If you really want to see how far one leg skiing will take the rest of your skiing, do it at very slow speeds and make smooth steered/shmeered (not carved) turns in various radius turns on extremely flat snow.
With out active flexion/extension and almost perfect balance/timing and constant movement through the turn (all parts of the turn) these will be extremely tough.
You will have to find just the right amount of rotary, and just the right amount of edge to affect the turn while still staying in balance in all directions.biggrin.gif
post #32 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post

Just curious, if you already ski well and your goal is skiing more performant, why don't you choose CSCF instead of CSIA? As I understand it, CSIA L1 is directed at teaching and progressing beginners, with a lot of rotations and wedges and the like, while the CSCF L1 (EL or Entry Level) s targeted at all the SnowStars levels, where 2 is parallel carving and 7 is competitive racer, a much higher level of performance skiing. I don't remember spending any time in a wedge at the EL course...

Second, if your own kids then pick up skiing more seriously, like mine did, it would more likely be in the form of a local racing club and this would make you qualified for that wink.gif

Also, if you do not enjoy the racing aspect, which will become the main focus after the first level, you can switch back to the CSIA for the higher levels. Having the CSCF L1 you can continue with the CSIA L2 as far as I know.

Cheers

 

Razie: I had not thought of this, and I admit I didn't know much about CSCF. I'll look it up.  I've got one kid who is interested in trying racing, so will give this a close look.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post

If you really want to see how far one leg skiing will take the rest of your skiing, do it at very slow speeds and make smooth steered/shmeered (not carved) turns in various radius turns on extremely flat snow.
With out active flexion/extension and almost perfect balance/timing and constant movement through the turn (all parts of the turn) these will be extremely tough.
You will have to find just the right amount of rotary, and just the right amount of edge to affect the turn while still staying in balance in all directions.biggrin.gif

 

This sounds tough!  Will give it a try (probably next December).

post #33 of 59
The great thing about this drill/exersize is it is very hard to cheat (except going faster) , instant feedback if you are doing it well or poorly. Often the feed back however is you ending up on the ground.

When you really begin to master it, it looks cool and when you begin to incorporate this balance into your all around skiing, you will not end up inside or back nearly as often. There will be Less park and ride, more fluid skiing.

With real good balance "seeing could really be over rated" in fog and flat light.
post #34 of 59
And yeah it's tough. Still working on it!biggrin.gif
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post

Razie: I had not thought of this, and I admit I didn't know much about CSCF. I'll look it up.  I've got one kid who is interested in trying racing, so will give this a close look.  
look for the entry level here https://www.canskicoach.org/en/certification-programs/structure-progression this is the path I took and am very happy with it.

It will be some inline courses followed by a 3 day workout on snow, where your own skiing is brought up to par and coaching principles and ideas ingrained.

Besides learning performance skiing myself, i am now coaching my kids through their racing years and spend tons of time with them that way. Very good alternative to CSIA, given your circumstances, which are rather similar to mine wink.gif

cheers
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post

with a lot of rotations and wedges and the like

 

some of the top guys believe you can go back to the basic wedge and fix problems from it. It was interesting when doing L3 course, we had a wedge session and the conductor pointed out that the flaws that showed up in the wedge were what had to be fixed in our higher end skiing.

post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jthski View Post

some of the top guys believe you can go back to the basic wedge and fix problems from it. It was interesting when doing L3 course, we had a wedge session and the conductor pointed out that the flaws that showed up in the wedge were what had to be fixed in our higher end skiing.
curious: the issues - were those skills that could be enhanced or technique/movements/timing? Can you give me an example?

Cheers
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jthski View Post
 

 

some of the top guys believe you can go back to the basic wedge and fix problems from it. It was interesting when doing L3 course, we had a wedge session and the conductor pointed out that the flaws that showed up in the wedge were what had to be fixed in our higher end skiing.

 

 

would not go that far but going back to very slow controlled matched skiing is usually a great start. 

post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post

curious: the issues - were those skills that could be enhanced or technique/movements/timing? Can you give me an example?

Cheers
If a movement lacking is the ability to release an edge and too much rotary at turn initiation doing a gliding wedge with direction changes using only edge skills will point this out.

Properly done this should create a straight scribed line on the edged ski behind the flat ski shmear. Direction changes would be caused by deflection of the edged ski, not by steering.

What this exposes is lack of precision in edging skills and isolation of rotary skills

Fixing this at several levels of your skiing will make for more accurate movements, smoother turn entry and better balance at the top of the turn..
It will also give you more options at that critical moment where you enter your turn.
post #40 of 59
Thread Starter 

I haven't been posting much on Epic this year, but I thought I'd write in with a progress report. I'm still improving, still feel like I have a lot more room to improve, still as obsessed as ever with getting better, and still (worse than ever) eating, breathing, sleeping skiing.

 

Thanks to all who gave me tips last year.  Here are some updates:

 

1. I did my L1 instructor course.  It wasn't hard to pass, but it was extremely useful.  Reviewing (and re-learning) the basics, and trying to do wedge turns and basic parallel turns at a "demonstration" level helped me become much more aware of a number of small issues related to balance, to pivoting vs. edging, etc.  It's also helped me learn a lot about how to learn from watching other skiers.

 

2. I spent a lot of time working on "stupid slow" exercises on easy pitches.  This has been great, for the same reason as #1; I am much more aware of subtle issues than I was a year ago. Pivot exercises, one-ski skiing, etc.

 

3. It took a while, but I think I have found a coach; I hope this will start to bring benefits soon.  

 

4. Mileage: I've skied a lot this year, and what I really notice is that I'm getting better at self-correction.  I can finish a run and not be satisfied, and now I'm much more able to say "aha, this was the problem".  

 

On the other hand, I did not make much progress on

 

1. Terrain expansion. I had two trips planned to the West this year, and both got derailed by the busiest two-month period at work that I can remember. Work has been incredibly busy, which is really unfortunate (especially so because fall was very quiet at work!). On the other hand, one of the planned trips was Whistler in March, and I think I am going to be OK missing that one, given the conditions.  I've gotten a good number of east-coast days in, and the conditions have been great, but there is no substitute for real mountain terrain.

 

2. Skating. That will be a project for this coming summer.

 

3. Razie, I did not have time to investigate CSCF; that will come next year.

post #41 of 59

take lots of video. that is a very cheap and easy and instant self-coaching tool. You can see the problems yourself most of the time.

post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post
 

Excuse the long post, but I’ve come to a bit of a crossroads in my skiing and I’m thinking about a number of different directions.  I’m not looking for advice on my skiing per se, but on how I might go about developing my skiing in the future.

 

Background:  45 yrs old, very fit (run, lift weights, play soccer 2x/week year round).  I’ve been skiing for seven years (I did a bit of messing around on skis when I was a teenager, but I don’t count that).  I ski 30+ days/year, but several of them are with my kids so the intensity level is not that high.

 

My local hill has a series of lessons for adults that follows the Programme d’Enseignement de Ski Alpin  ( http://www.pesq.ca/sport.php?id=9) which is Quebec’s answer to CSIA.  I’ve now completed the series of lessons, having passed the evaluation for the top level, which is as follows (excuse the rough translation).

 

“The skier performs short-radius (“decoupage progressif” - not sure how to translate this but I’d interpret it as “progressive carving”) turns on a very challenging slope, controlling his speed and keeping the same radius without changing the line of descent.  He must master anticipation, edging by angulation, and weight transfer.  The turns must be cleanly carved. He must perform the movements in the right sequence and with ease.”

 

and 

 

“The skier performs long-radius (pure carve, high-speed giant slalom) turns on a challenging slope, controlling his speed and keeping the same radius without changing the line of descent.  He must master anticipation, edging by angulation, and weight transfer.  The turns must be cleanly carved. He must perform the movements in the right sequence and with ease.”

 

I spent the last week at “The Camp” at Whistler Blackcomb, and was classified as level 5+ on WB’s scale (http://www.whistlerblackcomb.com/lessons-and-rentals/lessons/adult-ability-charts.aspx).  We skied everywhere on the mountain including a lot of the double-diamond terrain in the high alpine, and it went reasonably well. 

 

However, after all this, I still feel like I have no clue how to ski! I feel very comfortable on any groomed run, and in powder and crud.  I can function (but not very gracefully) in bumps. In particular, steep, bumpy terrain still messes with my head. And, I have a very serious interest in continuing to get better.   It’s one of the things I’ve loved about skiing, and about the lessons that I just finished - I can absolutely see the progression that I’ve made.

 

I’ve exhausted the organized lessons at my local hill, and while “The Camp” is an instructional program it is more of a “guided-touring/tips/how to exploit WB to the maximum” program. 

 

So, after all that: what do I do next?  

 

My first thought: I simply need mileage in the kind of terrain that gives me trouble. I realize I haven’t been skiing for that long, and that I need to ski terrain that challenges me and work hard at it (and get more days without the kids where I can push myself a bit harder).

 

My second thought: I’m committed to next year doing my level 1 instructors’ course, either through PESA or CSIA or both.  This will open up options for future professional development courses, etc.

 

Other things I’m considering: should I get a series of private lessons with a good instructor?  A day-long private at a big resort ($$$$!)? Other camps that are a bit more instruction-oriented? A racing club (I love running gates)?

 

Any advice would be helpful, and apologies for the long-winded post.

 

Try finding rough terrain, and skiing it fast with lots of turns.  No matter what you encounter keep the turns coming.   It never feels good but it constantly challenges your balancing because the roughness of the terrain keeps upsetting everything you try and do.  I remember a story of Jean Claude Killy and how he trained as a young ski racer.  He used to race the tram to the bottom of the mountain.  Skiing slowly is beneficial as well making balanced turns because it challenges balancing as well.  But skiing fast over rough terrain will make you a strong skier.  The key though is to make lots of turns.  YM

post #43 of 59

Hi RobQC, 

 

Congrats on passing your 1. Lots of good content, hey? 

 

Since you're in Quebec, I'd recommend Rookie Academy. I took the level 3/4 prep for one week and it was among the best ski programs I've taken. Courses are here: http://www.rookieacademy.com/csia-instructor-courses

post #44 of 59
Heh,so many people I know are getting their instructor cert, even if they don't plan to teach. maybe I should try it too? biggrin.gif
post #45 of 59

Any good coach will tell you that the overwhelmingly number one factor in ski improvement is putting in miles. It is very clear in this thread the many helpful things that can help a skier improve, but only provided that it doesn't aid in reducing your number one factor output. Many people that pursue certifications as a path for improvement also have a career, family, home, etc, that can really limit time spent on skiing. A lot of time can be spent on skiing that does not actually include the act of skiing itself. Be it watching races/videos, going to a ski shop, tuning your skis, talking about skiing, reading about skiing, emails, posts (me here now), being lectured on skiing, the list goes on and on. If you have a career, family, etc., and you want to improve, I recommend this equation for time spent on skiing: 95% skiing - 3% ski tuning - 2% everything else. :)

post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

Any good coach will tell you that the overwhelmingly number one factor in ski improvement is putting in miles. It is very clear in this thread the many helpful things that can help a skier improve, but only provided that it doesn't aid in reducing your number one factor output. Many people that pursue certifications as a path for improvement also have a career, family, home, etc, that can really limit time spent on skiing. A lot of time can be spent on skiing that does not actually include the act of skiing itself. Be it watching races/videos, going to a ski shop, tuning your skis, talking about skiing, reading about skiing, emails, posts (me here now), being lectured on skiing, the list goes on and on. If you have a career, family, etc., and you want to improve, I recommend this equation for time spent on skiing: 95% skiing - 3% ski tuning - 2% everything else. :)


Very true.  No substitute for lots of skiing.  The more the better.  YM

post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

Any good coach will tell you that the overwhelmingly number one factor in ski improvement is putting in miles. 

 

Actually, the number one factor is quality miles with deliberate, effective practice. Plenty of people put in loads of miles and are completely stalled in their development due to a lack of effective practice. 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 2/28/15 at 4:51pm
post #48 of 59
To me skiing is a system of movements. Starting at the feet and working up. Focus on each part till it's right. Through drills, practice and coaching.
post #49 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Hi RobQC, 

 

Congrats on passing your 1. Lots of good content, hey? 

 

Since you're in Quebec, I'd recommend Rookie Academy. I took the level 3/4 prep for one week and it was among the best ski programs I've taken. Courses are here: http://www.rookieacademy.com/csia-instructor-courses


I loved the level 1 course.  It was very interesting because none of it (e.g., demonstrating wedge turns) applied directly to my skiing, but on reflection it did make sense and I did take a lot of it back to my own skiing.  I highly recommend it even if not planning to teach, although I'm pretty sure I'll be out at our local bump teaching next winter.

 

What is the demographic of the Rookie Academy clientele?  Is it a 20-something party atmosphere?  It looks like a great course.

post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post


I highly recommend it even if not planning to teach, although I'm pretty sure I'll be out at our local bump teaching next winter.


Maybe we'll bump into each other, har har biggrin.gif
post #51 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post


Maybe we'll bump into each other, har har biggrin.gif


The bump (Mont St Bruno) is desperate for instructors.  It's hard to believe, given the size, but they claim that they have 32,000+ students in group or private lessons!

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

 

Actually, the number one factor is quality miles with deliberate, effective practice. Plenty of people put in loads of miles and are completely stalled in their development due to a lack of effective practice. 

I both agree and think that may go without saying since if it is a coach saying it, it is most likely being said to a developing racer or an instructor's student who is in class as representative of their interest in developing technically. I also agree that there are many avid skiers simply not interested in technique and perfectly happy to be out on the mountain getting fresh air and exercise, mimicking Gumby as well as placing as much ,if not more focus on the apre bar, the chick, the hot tub and wherever it leads from there. Hooah!

post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post


The bump (Mont St Bruno) is desperate for instructors.  It's hard to believe, given the size, but they claim that they have 32,000+ students in group or private lessons!

It is, that's almost 1% of the population of Montreal all congregated at just one little ski hill. Being 20 minutes away from the city does have its advantages.
post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post
 

What is the demographic of the Rookie Academy clientele?  Is it a 20-something party atmosphere?  It looks like a great course.

 

Good question. When I was there, the level 3+4 candidates ranged between 22-65ish, with most of us around 35. The group was older than you'd find in a typical "gap year" program, perhaps because you can sign up one week at a time. Also cool about the program: most of the participants had attended previously. We had a group dinner one night, and every day two or more of us went for lunch together. You always had someone to ski with outside of class time. Everyone had a great attitude.

 

It was so good that I've just booked another week for March. 

post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

I also want to add one thing.  On easy terrain practicing skiing on  one ski is a great way to work on balance.

I say you'll learn it faster on the Hahnenkamm.

post #56 of 59


Skip the instructor route, get into a race program...

post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
 


Skip the instructor route, get into a race program...

I like to think which route to take depends more on who in each program can help you the most which will differ from mt to mt.

 

Some race program coaches are more tied up with organizational tasks to offer any coaching considered intensive.

post #58 of 59
There's also the geographical consideration. The previously mentioned "bump" is 20 minutes away from the city, whereas racing programs are few and far between, and probably 2+ hours away.
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

I like to think which route to take depends more on who in each program can help you the most which will differ from mt to mt.

 

Some race program coaches are more tied up with organizational tasks to offer any coaching considered intensive.

 

Fine, get into a good race program (like mine)...

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