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First Time Out West: Rent or Borrow Skis - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Cftennant, I'll add something to what Posaune just said about boots.  

 

When you try them on in the shop they should be difficult to get on your feet.  Like, really difficult to wedge your foot inside.  Once you get your feet in, you should feel the boot walls touching the far ends of your toes, touching your feet along both sides, and contacting your feet along their tops (as in, ceiling touches your foot).  Your heels should not rise when you try to make them jiggle upwards inside the buckled boots, no matter what you do.  The boots should feel tight, but they should not be cutting off circulation.  All of this should happen without you needing to clamp down hard with the buckles.  

 

If the rental boot comes with a shoe size attached to it, try one that is TWO sizes smaller than what you normally wear in street shoes.  Force your foot into it, buckle up, stand around and see if after a few minutes it feels doable.  If so, you're ready to go.  If it hurts (as in painful) then go up a half size and try again.  One size smaller than street shoes should be the smallest you go; choose that size only if there's pain after standing around and walking around for a while in the boot, because the foot may say No! at first then rethink; give it a chance.  

 

Boots transfer your movements to the skis.  You don't want any empty air inside those boots; no loose steering wheels, please.  You'll have more fun if your boots are snug (as in, "tight" without pain), because your skis will do what you tell them to.  


Enjoy your trip.  I wish I were going, too.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 3/27/14 at 7:53pm
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Cftennant, I'll add something to what Posaune just said about boots.  

 

When you try them on in the shop they should be difficult to get on your feet.  Like, really difficult to wedge your foot inside.  You should feel the boot walls touching the far ends of your toes, touching your feet along both sides, and contacting your feet along their tops (as in, ceiling touches your foot).  Your heels should not rise when you try to make them jiggle upwards inside the buckled boots, no matter what you do.  The boots should feel tight, but they should not be cutting off circulation.  All of this should happen without you needing to clamp down hard with the buckles.  

 

If the rental boot comes with a shoe size attached to it, try one that is TWO sizes smaller than what you normally wear in street shoes.  Force your foot into it, buckle up, stand around and see if after a few minutes it feels doable.  If so, you're ready to go.  If it hurts (as in painful) then go up a half size and try again.  One size smaller than street shoes should be the smallest you go; choose that size only if there's pain after standing around and walking around for a while in the boot, because the foot may say No! at first then rethink; give it a chance.  

 

Boots transfer your movements to the skis.  You don't want any empty air inside those boots; no loose steering wheels, please.  You'll have more fun if your boots are snug (as in, "tight" without pain), because your skis will do what you tell them to.  


Enjoy your trip.  I wish I were going, too.

The above is more applicable for your own personal boot fitting.  

 

It isn't what I would do for a rental boot fitting where the lining is likely already packed out.  There are going to be weird pressure points cutting off your circulation and you will not be able to ski at all, or if you do you will strain a muscle and or get plantar fasciitis in one day.  at lunch when you are dying and you have no choice other than to take off your boots, you will have no chance to squash your hurting foot back into the torture device you picked, then you're stuckwalking around in your socks like up a creek without a paddle.

 

I would recommend going only halfway of what liquidfeet recommends.  Bring a pair of medium or thick socks to eat up the slack instead.  If you have ski socks great.  If you only have hiking socks, that would be an alterative option.  If you happen to have insoles, superfeet, or even doctor scholls for your footsize bring those.  Sometimes the stock footbed are straight out is missing out of rental boots, or your off the rack footbed is going to be better.

post #33 of 39

Maybe some rental shops take better care of their boots than others.  The rental shop boots I'm familiar with don't have these problems, but then the moutains I know are in New England.  The rental boot hell you describe may be more common at big mountain resorts out west.

post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
 

 

 or else going down to Baldy lift, going up and over to Alta.

 

 

Sheesh indeed

Thanks for making my original point.... You can get to Alta from Snowbird by taking the tunnel. Very easy to do. You just need the Alta/Snowbird tkt.... like I said.....Sheesh!

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cftennant View Post
 

I'm heading out to Utah to go skiing for the first time out west. I've skied in New England for several years, generally 2-4x a season. I'd say I'm an timid intermediate skier. Anyway, I'm looking for advice on whether or not to bring a set of skis my coworker has lent me. They are a K2 179 Silencer. I'm 5'7" and 160lbs. I've never skied on a twin tip ski before or any ski taller than I am. I'm concerned that the skis are over sized for me and my abilities. The boots fit great and I was able to adjust the poles to an appropriate size.

 

The only reason to bring the borrowed gear is if you are trying to cut costs.  If you can afford it, just rent.

 

As a timid intermediate, do not go to Snowbird.  If your friends insist on going there, peel off and take the shuttle over to Alta. You'll be glad you did.  Brighton would be another good choice for you.  Plenty to ski at both places for a skier at your level.

post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Maybe some rental shops take better care of their boots than others.  The rental shop boots I'm familiar with don't have these problems, but then the moutains I know are in New England.  The rental boot hell you describe may be more common at big mountain resorts out west.

For sure rental shops are different.  Can be a big difference between on mountain at a small place and an off mountain rental shop.  A small place may only refresh their rental fleet every 3-4 years.  If the percentage of skiers who rent is high, most likely they are mostly beginners and adv. intermediates.  A rental shop catering that that short of market won't bother to stock better boots.  Some rental shops only have one model of basic boots.  Others may have a few different brands, so it's possible to try a different boot that is a different shape.

 

The OP should do fine in Utah given that he has rented before and has some idea what to worry about when trying on boots.

post #37 of 39
Thread Starter 
I rented.

We hit snowbird on Thursday. Miserable visibility at the top, but a great day overall. Super different from New England.

We went to Brighton today and i had an even better day than the first. Big blue skies and a solid layer of fresh snow from the night before.

Canyon tomorrow!
post #38 of 39

Thanks for the update. Keep us posted with your experiences, both equipment and skiing. Have fun!

 

Karl

post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cftennant View Post

I rented.

We hit snowbird on Thursday. Miserable visibility at the top, but a great day overall. Super different from New England.

 

"Super different' might be an understatement.

 

So how did you do the rental process? What kind of equipment did you get?  What will you do differently next time?

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