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Need plan to ski Snowbird

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Looking for suggestions on a plan of attack for skiing Snowbird.  We'll be there 2 days next week.  We're good Eastern skiers who can get down most anything, like the trees, but don't need any cliffs or jumps.  Also what's the best place for ski rentals near our base in Cottonwood Heights.  Thanks.

post #2 of 22
post #3 of 22
What days?
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info so far.  We'll probably be there Monday and Tuesday.

post #5 of 22

I was there last week and it is pretty warm. [44f today at the base.]

 

Pervian lift in the morning take the tunnel go right as far as possible. Ski any line you like.

 

Come back to the resort side after lunch and try the area under GAD 11 just stay high. Little Cloud is good too.

post #6 of 22
Snow in Cirque, Primrose, Anderson's was pretty good yesterday. Doesn't look like snow until Wed/Thu of this coming week. Lower was heavier but never got slushy.
post #7 of 22
I think I'd take Path to paradise off the tram into MB and try to find some early SE facing corn.
I would then work the exposures from Powder Paradise all the way over to the Sugar Cliffs.
Eventually flip over to the front and hit the Cirque and Baldy.
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by DYNAMITE View Post
 

Thanks for the info so far.  We'll probably be there Monday and Tuesday.

 

I'll be there next week, arriving on Friday evening direct from Seoul (don't ask).

 

Send a PM and we can make arrangements.

post #9 of 22

I don't know if it is better etiquette around here to hijack a thread or create a new one that is very similar to an existing one.  I'll hijack and hope that was the right choice.

 

I am in a similar position as the OP. We are east coast skiers who have not seen much powder in our lives.  The girls are on the race team and rip steep, icy trails like Skyward at Whiteface.  My wife is a cautious skier, who is not comfortable on moguls, but can handle steep trails like Racer's Edge at Hunter.  She did not attempt Skyward.  She likes cruisers and groomed trails and gets flustered when we get a few inches of fresh, wet, east coat "powder".  She is nervous about skiing at Snowbird and, from what I have heard, rightfully so. Deer Valley would probably be a better fit for her, but we will be skiing in mid April, the week after Deer Valley closes, so we chose Snowbird.  We got a great deal and will be staying at the base of the mountain for 5 days with lift tickets for Snowbird included. I understand we can ski at Alta for an additional $30 per day. 

 

My daughters and I are really looking forward to skiing at Snowbird, but we want to make sure that my wife has a good time and that we can ride up on the lifts together as much as possible. My wife's skiing friends tell her that she will really like (and can definitely handle) Regulator Johnson, but I figure we should start on something easier like Big Emma's or Lupine Loop.  It is tempting to take the tram to the top for our first run, but I am not sure if Road to Provo, Mark Malu and Bassackwards is a good way to start things off.  The first run may set the tone for the week, so I want it to be a positive experience.  Any suggestions?  We will be staying at the Lodge at Snowbird if that matters.   

post #10 of 22
You should go to the top eventually to see the views and be impressed. But as far as slopes i remember the bananas run and other offshots from there would be good cruising to start. (Not a snowbird expert)
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qaqi View Post
 

I don't know if it is better etiquette around here to hijack a thread or create a new one that is very similar to an existing one.  I'll hijack and hope that was the right choice.

 

I am in a similar position as the OP. We are east coast skiers who have not seen much powder in our lives.  The girls are on the race team and rip steep, icy trails like Skyward at Whiteface.  My wife is a cautious skier, who is not comfortable on moguls, but can handle steep trails like Racer's Edge at Hunter.  She did not attempt Skyward.  She likes cruisers and groomed trails and gets flustered when we get a few inches of fresh, wet, east coat "powder".  She is nervous about skiing at Snowbird and, from what I have heard, rightfully so. Deer Valley would probably be a better fit for her, but we will be skiing in mid April, the week after Deer Valley closes, so we chose Snowbird.  We got a great deal and will be staying at the base of the mountain for 5 days with lift tickets for Snowbird included. I understand we can ski at Alta for an additional $30 per day. 

 

My daughters and I are really looking forward to skiing at Snowbird, but we want to make sure that my wife has a good time and that we can ride up on the lifts together as much as possible. My wife's skiing friends tell her that she will really like (and can definitely handle) Regulator Johnson, but I figure we should start on something easier like Big Emma's or Lupine Loop.  It is tempting to take the tram to the top for our first run, but I am not sure if Road to Provo, Mark Malu and Bassackwards is a good way to start things off.  The first run may set the tone for the week, so I want it to be a positive experience.  Any suggestions?  We will be staying at the Lodge at Snowbird if that matters.   

In the middle of April it probably wouldn't be a good idea to head up planning on skiing Regulator with your first run of the day.  When it gets sunny the day before and freezes at night Regulator will be a <bit> firm first thing in the morning.  If you want to ride the tram first thing it'd probably be a better idea to ski Lupine Loop or perhaps Powder Paradise if you want something a bit steeper than LL.  The sun hits Mineral first thing in the morning while the front side is still mostly under shade.  Ride back in Mineral for a few hours while you wait for the frontside to soften up a bit.  I usually try to be out of Mineral by 11:00 as the line tends to get longer as the day goes on.  (Mineral and the tram will be the only places you'll find liftlines that time of year.)

 

If it snows the night before feel free to ski wherever!  Have fun!

post #12 of 22

Just make sure you don't try to hit Mineral too early, even though the sun hits it early..verify that it has in fact softened. I once had to pick my way down a field of rock hard refrozen ice crags because the snow stayed cold longer than I thought. It's been awhile since I was at Snowbird and generally it was fantastic, but I vividly remember that run being unpleasant. 

post #13 of 22

For your expert girls, you may want to sign up for the mountain orientation tour, and then pepper the host with your questions on where to go.


A lot of the snowbird terrain is through gates. You should let them off the leash to go explore.  If you don't allow your girls to go through them, they will become bored with just the piste terrain.  It can be intimidating because you don't know where it may lead and they are always marked with huge warning signs and like doubleblack when it really might only be a singleblack or slightly easier in difficulty to get down. 

 

 If they follow other people or tracks they'll be fine.  But give them the usual parental stuff to stick together and use good judgement and all that jazz and to not be too shy to ask questions to locals  they run into for guidance.

 

Oh and if you happen to get soft snow, bring (or rent) your fat skis to make the day a lot easier and less work -at least for the girls if they're going into the offpiste

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by DYNAMITE View Post
 

Looking for suggestions on a plan of attack for skiing Snowbird.  We'll be there 2 days next week.  We're good Eastern skiers who can get down most anything, like the trees, but don't need any cliffs or jumps.  Also what's the best place for ski rentals near our base in Cottonwood Heights.  Thanks.

 

Generally my plan of attack consists of starting at the top and working my way down.

post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

Generally my plan of attack consists of starting at the top and working my way down.

That was my career path.

 

BK

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qaqi View Post
 
  My wife is a cautious skier, who is not comfortable on moguls, but can handle steep trails like Racer's Edge at Hunter.  She did not attempt Skyward.  She likes cruisers and groomed trails and gets flustered when we get a few inches of fresh, wet, east coat "powder".  She is nervous about skiing at Snowbird and, from what I have heard, rightfully so.  Any suggestions?  We will be staying at the Lodge at Snowbird if that matters.   

 

Get your wife a pass to the Cliff Spa.   Don't be in any hurry to get her out on the slopes early in the morning.  The easiest way into Mineral is through the tunnel, but the bottom pitch of Lupine faces west,  so it takes a while to soften and it's actually quite steep.  Path to Paradise side softens earliest, but it's a  narrow cat track and can see a lot of very fast traffic when that's the only thing soft.

 

Spring skiing is all about exposures and when they soften.  Local knowledge is critical.  You might want to hire an instructor your first day or so?

post #17 of 22

There's actually going to be several folks from this area out at Snowbird and surrounding areas over the next couple weeks.  Wish I could be one of them hahaha.  Enjoy!

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by givethepigeye View Post

Snow in Cirque, Primrose, Anderson's was pretty good yesterday. Doesn't look like snow until Wed/Thu of this coming week. Lower was heavier but never got slushy.

 

OpenSnow  is calling for new snow on Sunday.:yahoo:

post #19 of 22

Thanks everyone for the solid advice.

 

Shredhead - That is brilliant.  My wife likes to ski, but I am sure she would not mind spending a couple mornings in the spa, while the girls and I explore the mountain.  I hadn't thought about hiring a guide, but we might just do that for a half day or so.  I will probably put my wife in a group lesson at Alta at least one of the days, especially if we get a dump and she has a hard time skiing when there there is "too much snow".

 

raytseng - I will let them explore, but I will probably be with them most of the time. They are better racers than off-piste skiers and they are only 9 and 12.  They only own race skis, which have about a 65mm waist.  I bought some cheap, wide skis for each of them Ebay. The skis are several years old, but the bases and edges look to be in decent shape.  They should be fine after I sharpen the edges, do some p-tex work and wax them a few times. I think they will have more fun with those than with their slalom skis.  

post #20 of 22

free mountain tour is free, perhaps a paid guide on your subsequent day(s).

 

perhaps let's start a 1000post thread to fight over whether you  shoudl tip on a free mountain tour, and whether if your tip goes to the host's pocket or a mountain-related fund make a diference.

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

free mountain tour is free, perhaps a paid guide on your subsequent day(s).

 

perhaps let's start a 1000post thread to fight over whether you  shoudl tip on a free mountain tour, and whether if your tip goes to the host's pocket or a mountain-related fund make a diference.

Free mountain tour is on groomers.  Useful for learning how to get around.  I did it as an intermediate skiing solo during a ski club trip quite a while back and enjoyed it.  Definitely glad I had done it since visibility was low the next ski day due to a snowstorm.

 

Don't know about Snowbird, but at Big Sky the mountain host absolutely refused any tip.

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Free mountain tour is on groomers.  Useful for learning how to get around.  I did it as an intermediate skiing solo during a ski club trip quite a while back and enjoyed it.  Definitely glad I had done it since visibility was low the next ski day due to a snowstorm.

 

Don't know about Snowbird, but at Big Sky the mountain host absolutely refused any tip.

 

Yep, free tours always stay inbounds, whereas a guide will take you wherever they want to go.  But even if it's on groomers, they know the mountain, so  if you ask them what you are looking for at the beginning and throughout the tour, they will point it out along the way on what gates to go through..

 

I mentioned in the big tip thread, that at whistler anyway, they have a sign that 100% of tips will be donations for the avy dogs. I think that's a good idea to have a worthwhile cause to either encourage tipping (or at least not be in the position to refuse of money) , and makes it easier for the hosts to solicit towards a good cause rather than to their own pocket.

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