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What's the service life for Dura Ace and Ultegra deraiileurs?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Any idea what the approx mileage is under average use before major overhaul or replacement is needed?

 

Thank you

 

Dave

post #2 of 9
A damn long time. Just keep track of chain wear and all will be well.
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

A damn long time. Just keep track of chain wear and all will be well.

 

This.  I've replaced a front Ultegra derailleur; jammed and bent after over 8 years service and never replaced a rear.  Chains replaced on higher milage bike 2-3 times a year, rear cassettes every year and a half and front rings two to three years.  I'm averaging around 15,000kms a year on my road bike.

post #4 of 9

I'm riding a 10 year old 7800 group, and the bike that I sold to buy it is still going strong under a friend. It's 7400 group has to be close to 25 years old and to my knowledge is still original except for wear items.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys smile.gif

Hey, while we're on this topic, how many miles do you put on your cassette before swapping it? Same question for chainrings.

I read recommendations to do 3 chains before rings.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super D View Post

Thanks guys smile.gif

Hey, while we're on this topic, how many miles do you put on your cassette before swapping it? Same question for chainrings.

I read recommendations to do 3 chains before rings.

As others have said - derailleur life is long unless damaged in some way.  Might get a spare set of jockey wheels - they're a "wear part" and will eventually need to be replaced to keep your chain rolling/ shifting optimally.  

 

Driveline replacement timelines is a case-by-case kind of thing.  The cleaner and better lubed you keep it, the longer it will last.  Grit and sand, especially combined with cross chaining will chew things up fairly fast.  

 

I have a Park Tools "euro" stand and pop my bike on that after every ride to do a quick driveline clean.  Taking 5 min or so after every ride makes the chore simple and quick.  

 

I run multiple wheelsets between multiple bikes, which makes component replacement based on mileage a headache.  Rather than track cassettes, chains, and rings in a spreadsheet, I have a general idea of how long a chain has been in service and periodically check it with a "chain checker" (http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-wear-indicator-CC-3-2)  to decide how much wear it actually has.     My strategy with chains is to replace them more frequently on my "A", bikes and rotate the worn chains  through my "rain bike" before finally disposing of them.  I do the same for cassettes and tires too.  Chainrings I monitor by tooth wear and replace when they get "shark toothy" - i.e. look like a very pointed shark tooth.  The "pins and ramps" on the inner side of the big ring also wear depending on the amount of shifting you do.  As they wear, the chain will not be picked up off the small ring as efficiently and you'll notice a decrease in shifting crispness. 

 

When you start getting skipping in your driveline that can't be tuned out with your barrel adjusters, it's a good sign the cassette (or key cassette cogs) needs to be replaced.  That's pretty much the "hard stop" for getting maximum life out of your wear parts.  If you're more fanatical about shifting performance, you'll change more often.   Nothing like all new driveline components to give you that OMG - this is what it's supposed to work like - experience.  As you ride more, your sensitivity to precision will dictate your parts replacement strategy.

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super D View Post

Any idea what the approx mileage is under average use before major overhaul or replacement is needed?


Thank you


Dave


 

Hi Dave,
My personal rule of thumb is to change the chain once I notice an unacceptable level of stretch (using the Park Tool). My cassetts last twice or three times longer than my chains. My chainrings last even more. As long as you maintain your drivetrain very well, you could put thousands of miles into it every year and it will continue to give you a trouble free ride. I have a couple of bikes with Campy 8 speed drivetrains that I have been using for more than 20 years and they still have a smooth shift. My 9 speed Dura Ace group that I bough in Sept 1997 (my birthday) is still shifting quite well.
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
 

As others have said - derailleur life is long unless damaged in some way.  Might get a spare set of jockey wheels - they're a "wear part" and will eventually need to be replaced to keep your chain rolling/ shifting optimally.  

 

Driveline replacement timelines is a case-by-case kind of thing.  The cleaner and better lubed you keep it, the longer it will last.  Grit and sand, especially combined with cross chaining will chew things up fairly fast.  

 

I have a Park Tools "euro" stand and pop my bike on that after every ride to do a quick driveline clean.  Taking 5 min or so after every ride makes the chore simple and quick.  

 

I run multiple wheelsets between multiple bikes, which makes component replacement based on mileage a headache.  Rather than track cassettes, chains, and rings in a spreadsheet, I have a general idea of how long a chain has been in service and periodically check it with a "chain checker" (http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-wear-indicator-CC-3-2)  to decide how much wear it actually has.     My strategy with chains is to replace them more frequently on my "A", bikes and rotate the worn chains  through my "rain bike" before finally disposing of them.  I do the same for cassettes and tires too.  Chainrings I monitor by tooth wear and replace when they get "shark toothy" - i.e. look like a very pointed shark tooth.  The "pins and ramps" on the inner side of the big ring also wear depending on the amount of shifting you do.  As they wear, the chain will not be picked up off the small ring as efficiently and you'll notice a decrease in shifting crispness. 

 

When you start getting skipping in your driveline that can't be tuned out with your barrel adjusters, it's a good sign the cassette (or key cassette cogs) needs to be replaced.  That's pretty much the "hard stop" for getting maximum life out of your wear parts.  If you're more fanatical about shifting performance, you'll change more often.   Nothing like all new driveline components to give you that OMG - this is what it's supposed to work like - experience.  As you ride more, your sensitivity to precision will dictate your parts replacement strategy.

 

Great info, thank you! 

And I'm picking up a Park chain wear indicator tool today. Don't know why I've never owned one, after all these years riding, sheesh. :)

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super D View Post
 

Any idea what the approx mileage is under average use before major overhaul or replacement is needed?

 

Thank you

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave,
My personal rule of thumb is to change the chain once I notice an unacceptable level of stretch (using the Park Tool). My cassetts last twice or three times longer than my chains. My chainrings last even more. As long as you maintain your drivetrain very well, you could put thousands of miles into it every year and it will continue to give you a trouble free ride. I have a couple of bikes with Campy 8 speed drivetrains that I have been using for more than 20 years and they still have a smooth shift. My 9 speed Dura Ace group that I bough in Sept 1997 (my birthday) is still shifting quite well.

 

I've generally kept a routine of cleaning the drivetrain every 3rd ride, so that's good, but haven't measured chain stretch before. I just eyeballed gear and chainring tooth shape. Getting that Park tool today. 

 

Thank you for sharing, really appreciate it.

 

I wonder how my old bikes are doing in new owners' hands, if they were maintained, and if they're still enjoying a riding life. Isn't that silly? :)

There was one in particular that was my dream bike and holds a special place in my memory, a Raleigh English road racing frame that I built up in high school and raced on. Just like this one:
http://velospace.org/node/40524

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