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Should I fix these damages

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I skied via few places without snow. Please find attached. Should I fix those? If yes how?

 

Thanks.

 

post #2 of 17

yes

 

first pic.  Ptex candle.

 

second pic... is that a core shot?

 

if so, then take it to the shop and have them fix all of the damage, so it would be ready for next season

post #3 of 17

I would weld the one near the edge, but wouldn't bother with the others.  A stone grind would lessen or remove the minor dings.

Ptex candles are a waste of time imo.  Lots of info on this site on how to do repairs - searching the site with google can sometimes give you better hits than the forum search function.

post #4 of 17

ptex candle filling is only good for plugging up a hole so you can wax the ski without getting wax in the hole. Imo.

The candle filling never lasts. How many runs can you get? Is the game. Often <1.

post #5 of 17

I'd p-tex them all. My p-tex repairs last a long time, though.

post #6 of 17

I routinely ski on worse bases than that and I don't notice any issues.  My major concerns are about keeping water out of the core.  You don't appear to have any exposed core.  My secondary concerns are about keeping sharp edges.  I can't see edge damage in your photos.

 

When I get that type of damage to my base, I use a sharp steel scraper to remove any P-Tex that stands proud of the base.  When I wax my skis, the recesses usually get filled somewhat, not that it matters.

 

I'm a recreational skier.  If you're a racer, the answers likely will be different.

post #7 of 17
I'd take butt of a screwdriver to rub in any high spot on the big scratch and that's it, my skis get more damage than that from the ice clumps and no noticeable performance difference.
post #8 of 17

Ski more, stress less.  Unless you're racing on these skis, those beauty marks are just rewards for having a good time.  Next major tune with base grind, they will disappear.  

 

Have a beer.  Forget about it.

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. I am recreational but ski on black diamond and crud/ice

post #10 of 17

To be a bit more serious, the Ptex damage does not allow for any damage to the ski core and is unlikely to affect performance in a meaningful way.  I would not hesitate to hot wax the skis and touch up the side edges.  I like to put off the seasonal base grind until January when a real base has setup as I expect some early season dings.

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

These are brand new skies (after 5 days of skiing). And what I am afraid of is dangerous situation (it getting caught up on something)...

post #12 of 17
The one on the edge maybe should be fixed, but the others are just a "more open structure". ;-)
post #13 of 17

Curious how you got the scratch that goes across the base in the first picture. I'd be inclined to fix the gouge next to the edge, because I'm paranoid about edges, but you could probably get away without fixing it. I'd fix it with welded in ptex ribbon--using a soldering gun type welder (Tognar is one source). Repairs next to an edge usually require metalgrip first but for a ding that small i think just the ptex would be enough. The shallow scratches in the first picture will be hard to repair even if you wanted to--hard to get ptex to hold in scratches that shallow. To get the ptex to hold you'd have to do more damage to the base than the rock did.

post #14 of 17
If you're tuning your own skis, you will probably notice the "bumps" where they are. That is probably the only time you will notice it.

I would probably smooth them out and leave them be. If the ptex "seal" is broken, you should address that so moisture doesn't get to the core but it doesn't look like that is the case.
post #15 of 17

Like everyone else I only bother to fill gouges that are as deep as the one along the edge.  P-tex doesn't stick in very minor scrapes, but wax fills them nicely for all intents and purposes.  If your p-tex repair isn't holding in a deeper gouge that isn't a core shot or along a lot of edge odds are you didn't clean it well enough before filling it.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

Ski more, stress less.  Unless you're racing on these skis, those beauty marks are just rewards for having a good time.  Next major tune with base grind, they will disappear.  

 

Have a beer.  Forget about it.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

To be a bit more serious, the Ptex damage does not allow for any damage to the ski core and is unlikely to affect performance in a meaningful way.  I would not hesitate to hot wax the skis and touch up the side edges.  I like to put off the seasonal base grind until January when a real base has setup as I expect some early season dings.


Yep, ski them, there is nothing bad enough there to have it fixed anytime soon.

 

If you do your own tuning, you can fill in the one by the edge. My skis look worse then that. They ski great and have good edge hold. They have over 100 day's on them and have never been to a shop.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

I'd p-tex them all. My p-tex repairs last a long time, though.
I'd repair the gouge by the edge and leave the others. Even the crosswise one shouldn't affect performance no matter what runs you ski--unless you're racing, in which case ignore me.

The two year old shallow drip candle repairs in my Geishas are completely intact; they were probably a little deeper than your shallower marks. The repairs have worn faster than the base around them, which is no surprise. I cleaned the gouges and scrapes with alcohol at the time, used a dental pick to make sure they were clean and to rough up the surface a little, and filled them gradually, one drop at a time, to get the dripped p-tex to settle as far into the gouges as I could get it.
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