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Convince me to go (or not go) to New Zealand

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hi guys, 

 

I had promised myself to get my level 3 this year. My thought was to go to Whistler for 3-4 weeks, ski and session every day, then take the exam. However, due to a recent injury compounded with some work obligations, this won't be possible. I already feel like a bit of a lame duck since I couldn't pass the slalom portion of the development-level coaching course, and now living in a skier's no-man's-land, I really feel I need a victory of some sort. 

 

So the "easiest" option, I think, would be to take Rookie Academy's 5 (err 6) week CSIA level 3 course in New Zealand. It's not cheap. It's basically like spending $1.8k/week. And surely it will take major effort to meet the standard. But I'd like to think that by the end of 6 weeks nonstop skiing I'll have passed the level 3 exam. In theory I could get my financial situation together by then to make it happen. I'd need to take a leave of absence from work - and that would be a good thing. But man, is it ever expensive... almost as much as a graduate degree...

 

Can anyone here talk me into it, or for that matter, talk me out of it? Has anyone here had success on a high-level (ie not 1+2) training program like this?


Edited by Metaphor_ - 3/18/14 at 9:58pm
post #2 of 21
But... Are you trying to get a CSIA level 3? Or a New Zealand level 3? How transferable are they? Won't you have to retake in country when you get home?
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 

sorry sibhusky, updated, it's a CSIA course

post #4 of 21

You'll sit CSIA L3.  I had a friend do it.  She passed.  You do get to ski with JF Beaulieu, he had Sebastien Michel and John Gillies in recent seasons make guest appearances, so if money was no issue, then do it.  Maybe ask who they've lined up this year to teach. If you have that caliber of trainers, who were all part of the last interski, then it should be a blast!  Or Met why not go do it in Canada in Quebec.  There are heaps of these run in Canada and even in Japan, or Chile or just go to heaps of CSIA development days, performance camps and supercamps.  Also work part time and go to sessions?

 

Here are some clips of the trainers you may have to get you thinking :) Give us a like!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #5 of 21

DO it

Summer season skiing will add loads to your skills. I was a 'rookie' curently in their 'hall of fame' and it's fantastic. TC is amazing, and the training is great too! No reason not too...

post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Hi guys, 

 

I had promised myself to get my level 3 this year. My thought was to go to Whistler for 3-4 weeks, ski and session every day, then take the exam. However, due to a recent injury compounded with some work obligations, this won't be possible. I already feel like a bit of a lame duck since I couldn't pass the slalom portion of the development-level coaching course, and now living in a skier's no-man's-land, I really feel I need a victory of some sort. 

 

So the "easiest" option, I think, would be to take Rookie Academy's 5 (err 6) week CSIA level 3 course in New Zealand. It's not cheap. It's basically like spending $1.8k/week. And surely it will take major effort to meet the standard. But I'd like to think that by the end of 6 weeks nonstop skiing I'll have passed the level 3 exam. In theory I could get my financial situation together by then to make it happen. I'd need to take a leave of absence from work - and that would be a good thing. But man, is it ever expensive... almost as much as a graduate degree...

 

Can anyone here talk me into it, or for that matter, talk me out of it? Has anyone here had success on a high-level (ie not 1+2) training program like this?

 

Your thumb, right?

Did you go on that trip with your ski club?

post #7 of 21

go for it while you can do this kind of thing. Great experience and tons of skiing between seasons. Awesome. It does sound a bit expensive though. I was contemplating a 5k 10 day race camp in south America... Sounds like yours is better value

post #8 of 21
Why pay them for a course? If you want to go, get an instructor job and get paid yourself.
post #9 of 21

_Metaphor, I wanted to do the Rookie Academy last summer but I had too many weddings to attend.  I've heard from several folk who've attended that it is a good intense course.  I'd do it this summer but I have spousal issues given the amount of skiing this winter and the expense of several trips and hell skiing....

 

Skipass, sure, you'll improve if you teach, but you won't improve as much as if you are spending at least 6 days a week working on your skiing and teaching.

 

Mike

post #10 of 21
I can think of a lot of better ways to spend 10k than the psia pyramid scheme. But whatever makes you happy.
post #11 of 21

I can't speak to all of that other stuff, but I can tell you that New Zealand is an awesome place to visit.  I spent a few months there and didn't want to leave.  I would just go there for the summer time skiing to have fun and not worry about the other stuff.

post #12 of 21

Wanaka is an awesome part of the world and if you are planning on doing the course starting July 26 then you will get the best part of the season and avoid the Australian and NZ school holidays.

post #13 of 21
I used to work down in NZ and it's awesome. Rookies is a great program as well. Not sure if I would pay that much for my L3, but I know people who have, and been successful, so if it's worth it to you, go for it!
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the suggestions, all. You've convinced me! I've requested a leave of absence from work.

 

For folks wondering "why the @#$% would you spend $10K on 6 weeks of coaching?" Well...

  • Going on courses is my idea of fun.
  • I have a 10 year plan to get my level 4, so I need to catch up.
  • Most folks (like myself) develop better when a coach is invested in enabling the learner to achieve a specific goal (e.g. passing the level 3) 
  • It's probably a cool trip... even though NZ culture appears to be Canada with accents, there are also lots of stopover opportunities (SanFran or California, Australia, etc.)

 

So... hopefully off I go :)

 

LF, yup, torn UCL in the palm (I feel lame saying "I hurt my thumb"). Didn't go on the club trip to Tremblant--the doctor advised that any activity that elevated the heart rate would double the healing time. Also had to cancel a trip to Stowe. All the more reason to try to get out to NZ!

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 
  • It's probably a cool trip... even though NZ culture appears to be Canada with accents

 

I think you'll be pleasantly surprised to find that's not the case.

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

 

I think you'll be pleasantly surprised to find that's not the case.

 

That is good to hear.

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

 

I think you'll be pleasantly surprised to find that's not the case.

Being a kiwi who has skied a bit in Canada I concur with this - there is a definite cultural difference. Pretty much everyone is friendly though. Wanaka didn't start out as a ski town, started as a rural service town and summer tourism. It's also the base for climbing in the Mt Aspiring national park.

 

Also, in contrast to Canada, you'll find that Wanaka itself is very temperate (and colourful) compared to Canadian resorts in Winter. There isn't usually snow on the ground in town, which means that there is good mountain-biking, running trails etc that are accessible in winter. Also you can get great coffee (and craft beer and wine) almost anywhere in Wanaka - current favourite cafe is the Federal Diner, it's a bit hidden from the main street, but really good coffee and food.

 

Looking at the accommodation options on their website, all are really central with the exception of Thorngreen and Avalanche View. There isn't local public transport in Wanaka (apart from hitching a lift) and those two you are looking at a half hour, give or take, walk to town and there aren't any shops for things like groceries near either of them.

 

There's five or so ski shops in town and at least last winter one of the bike shops stayed open in winter. Oh and bring warm stuff for evenings etc, central heating in NZ houses is the exception not the rule and some can find the houses cold.

 

If you want to end your trip on a high budget a bit extra and go heliskiing - Wanaka is a heliski base too.

post #18 of 21

Yes, Wanaka is awesome.  I spent a good 10+ days there and highly recommend the mountain-biking.  If I was going to leave the US and live somewhere else, it would be high on my list.

post #19 of 21

Be sure to visit Fergburger in nearby Queenstown, best burgers in the world!

post #20 of 21
Just saw this posted on snowheads by steveangus, might be a cheaper way of getting down there than rookies.

A colleague who I both work with here in Val d'Isere and then in the summer he works at Coronet Peak (near Queenstown NZ) and in particular he runs a GAP year style instructor training company just sent this around.... thought you might be interested! His email address is either:

colin at tdcski.com or
colin at sitco.co.nz

"Level 2's work opportunities in NZ.
For those that don't know me, I've been going down to NZ for a number of years, and this year in conjunction with the Coronet Peak ski school I am happy to say that we have got permission to run a Work and Train program, aimed at Level 2 qualified ski instructors. (I am afraid that for 2014 we only have ski instructor positions available)
We have a number of job places set aside or on hold for people who are willing to sign up for a training program as well.
Work is fully paid – You will be full employees of the ski school. (June/July)
Training is 12 days either 3 days a week for 4 weeks. (August)
You would come down to NZ work for 5 weeks June/July and be a full member of the Ski School, and then after the busy school holidays they are then released, and the can join in the structured Performance Training.
Level 3 Training is generic “ski/teach better” performance and development training.
People can be BASI, NZSIA, CSIA or any qualification.
There is an option to sit the NZSIA Level 3, and in the future we are hoping to add in a Race Training option as well.
Level 2’s sometimes find it hard to get work down in NZ due to the mass of people applying, and this is a great opportunity for maybe some of you who are newly qualified instructors to get experience, hours and training all at the same time.
If anyone is interested, or you would like further information then please contact me."
post #21 of 21
Good to know. The difference is rookies is for csia training so met can sit his L3 if he is up for it.
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