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Concrete Absolutes?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

While "concrete" absolutes are nothing new or earth shattering, they may help some change their focus a bit.  I personally do not believe that I want to remain in any absolute spot over my skis though a detent or home position is important to move from or in and out of.  Knowing that I can most effectively influence my skis tipping, twisting, and pressure distribution when I am in the "sweet spot" but that when in the sweet spot I may want to move a particular direction from it to influence edging, pressure, and/or rotary affects.  Anticipating the movements needed to remain in dynamic balance and keeping us on our desired path requires some movement out of any concrete absolute position.  

 

 

For those that are challenged with trying to improve skiing performance (that would be all of us) I would suggest assessing and refining four different areas:  Technique, Equipment, Physiology, Psychology (TEPP) to eliminate or minimize performance robbing issues in each of these four areas.  Optimum skiing performance is NOT limited to technique or how we move over our skis.  All four areas of TEPP need to be considered in order to reach one's potential in any sport.  Equipment affects our ability to effectively balance, edge, twist, and pressure our skis.  Psychological anxiety management and intent to turn affect our balance and efficiency.  Physiology affects our ability to move effectively and meet the physical demands skiing places on us.

 

just sayin...

 
post #2 of 8

Thought this thread was going to be about josh...

post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
 

While "concrete" absolutes are nothing new or earth shattering, they may help some change their focus a bit.  I personally do not believe that I want to remain in any absolute spot over my skis though a detent or home position is important to move from or in and out of.  Knowing that I can most effectively influence my skis tipping, twisting, and pressure distribution when I am in the "sweet spot" but that when in the sweet spot I may want to move a particular direction from it to influence edging, pressure, and/or rotary affects.  Anticipating the movements needed to remain in dynamic balance and keeping us on our desired path requires some movement out of any concrete absolute position.  

 

 

For those that are challenged with trying to improve skiing performance (that would be all of us) I would suggest assessing and refining four different areas:  Technique, Equipment, Physiology, Psychology (TEPP) to eliminate or minimize performance robbing issues in each of these four areas.  Optimum skiing performance is NOT limited to technique or how we move over our skis.  All four areas of TEPP need to be considered in order to reach one's potential in any sport.  Equipment affects our ability to effectively balance, edge, twist, and pressure our skis.  Psychological anxiety management and intent to turn affect our balance and efficiency.  Physiology affects our ability to move effectively and meet the physical demands skiing places on us.

 

just sayin...

 

 

Bud, and everyone reading this thread, what percentage of the skiers at your home mountain are skiing mostly "in the sweet spot?" 

Over 50%?  Under?  

post #4 of 8
On a Saturday or a Monday?
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

Bud, and everyone reading this thread, what percentage of the skiers at your home mountain are skiing mostly "in the sweet spot?" 

Over 50%?  Under?  

 

Agree 100% with Bud's first paragraph. My view is that the "sweet spot" varies depending on what one is trying to make one's skis do.

 

Percentage of general, recreational skiers skiing mostly in the sweet spot - very small, fewer than 5%.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

Bud, and everyone reading this thread, what percentage of the skiers at your home mountain are skiing mostly "in the sweet spot?" 

Over 50%?  Under?  

 

 

no such thing. I would say fewer than 1 percent of the skiers the hill can balance effectively. Very few skier have true wide open range of balance. 

post #7 of 8

The terrain changes, the snow changes, your speed changes, your intent changes.  Why shouldn't your stance/balance change too?  It only makes sense that you will have to adjust your position to remain dynamic.  

 

With regard to TEPP, up until recently, I wouldn't have agreed about equipment being a major factor.  However I recently changed to new skis, and when I went back to my old skis, which I thought I loved, I realized that I had been fighting with them for 10 years.  It wasn't until I skied on the right equipment that I could see the problems I was having.  

 

As for how many skiers are skiing mostly in the sweet spot, I would say less than 5%.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

no such thing. I would say fewer than 1 percent of the skiers the hill can balance effectively. Very few skier have true wide open range of balance. 

 

Gotta agree with Josh in spirit.  If the race and freestyle teams are away, less than 0.1% of the skiers at my hill can balance effectively.  That means that on a typical weekend day with 10k skiers, there are about 10 skiers (plus some racers and freestylers) who are skiing in good balance.  This is a pity since skiing is fundamentally a balance sport.  ASEA should fixate on this issue and use it to reinvent itself.

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