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ETU takeaways...

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
will you all take a few minutes and please post the 1 or 2 takeaways that you have from attending ETU... Thanks!

kiersten
post #2 of 26
"There's no ice at Stowe!"

This comment sort of became our group's motto after our instructor Tim related a story to us. Apparently several of the PSIA demo team members were making an instructional video at one point on the subject of skiing ice. And the camera went through their group getting comments like "we see ice at Snowbird", "we see ice at Sun Valley", etc. Finally got to Dave Merriam who replied, straight-faced, that "there's no ice at Stowe".

After we would ski over the icey -- I mean "glassy" -- sections, we would be repeating this to each other.

------

The other classic comment from Tim: there are two kinds of conditions at Stowe: good and easy. This weekend was "good".
post #3 of 26
On a more serious note...

I forget who said it, but at Bob Barnes' Saturday evening presentation, somebody said "let the pressure come from the hill". I tried to keep that in mind while skiing on Sunday, and I found it made a difference.

But, the "big one" as it were, was when Tim told us to imagine a line extending to the trail edge along the inside edge of our inside ski. When starting a new turn, don't let the tails of your skis cross over that line. "Roll the ankles" and "phantom moves" never worked for me, but that mental picture does. I don't know if anybody was smiling more then me after we took a run down the icy "North Slope" trail and I felt totally in control the whole way down. What a difference!

Heck, I'm still smiling!

[img]smile.gif[/img]
post #4 of 26
I had the absolute privilege of having Bob Barnes as my coach. He is just amazing. The right sorts of corrections and tips, and fabulous encouragement.

Now I've got to go back and read about 50,000 lines of old posts to figure out in my head what he got me into doing in muscle memory [img]smile.gif[/img]

All I know is I was skiing a lot smoother, more still and yet more dynamic, and a whole lot easier, by the end of the ETU.

And "There is no ice in Stowe" - except in certain parking lots. Apologies for waking up the crowd Saturday night with the loud curses from underneath my van.
post #5 of 26
Did you fall down and go boom? Is that what I heard? I thought the avalanche guns were going off!
post #6 of 26
No matter how easy the trail you are on, or the one you are merging with looks, don't let your guard down. I do it all the time and I did it at Stowe.

Let the feet work together! No more single action of the feet!

Turn to accelerate. Did I hear that right, Tom? I always thought that turning was used to control the speed.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by skierteach:
No matter how easy the trail you are on, or the one you are merging with looks, don't let your guard down. I do it all the time and I did it at Stowe.

Let the feet work together! No more single action of the feet!

Turn to accelerate. Did I hear that right, Tom? I always thought that turning was used to control the speed.
Hello Skierteach:

I hope you are feeling better after your accident. We got another dump of the white stuff today. Anyhow, I just wanted to say it was nice to meet you and hope we can get together again.
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
My two favorite takeaways from skiing with Stu:

1. learning about the slow and the fast parts of the skis and when to use them

2. skiing the slow line fast

those were two major LIGHTBULBS that went on my head.

thanks Coach,
kiersten
post #9 of 26
It is truly great to hear of the successes and revelations you all have had at the ETU!

I too believe that there are only two kinds of conditions--those that are GOOD, and those that are GOOD FOR YOU! There's no doubt that those conditions over the weekend were good for you! With single-digit temperatures following the rain on Thursday, things "set up" a bit. Stowe did a great job with their snowmaking through the cold nights, though, and their grooming made the conditions actually quite good, I thought. Yes, it was firm, and it got a bit skied-off in the afternoons, but hard conditions like that give unmistakable and accurate feedback about your movements (and about the sharpness, or lack thereof, of your edges!). Push those tails even a little, and hard, slick snow will let you know about it!

I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to ski the other extreme, too, as Monday brought in what was reported by some sources as the third largest snow storm ever recorded at Stowe! Those conditions were just plain GOOD!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #10 of 26
Hey Bob, this should give you an idea of how effective a mere 2 days at ETU was. I have received a few PMs, as well as comments related indirectly to me by Mark, from people who have seen me ski at various times last year, in much better conditions.

The feedback is that I look much better! I never thought I could actually improve while skiing on ice!
Thank you Tom Burch! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ December 21, 2003, 10:49 PM: Message edited by: Lisamarie ]
post #11 of 26
You looked the same to me. [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #12 of 26
I saw LM ski past our group, and I remarked to her husband, Mark XS, how substantially she's improved. She didn't look like the same skier as in Utah - she skied way better.

I still have a disk that nolo sent after the ESA, and I've watched it from time to to. Bob Barnes took videos of us, and MAN! It was really great to see it - I HAVE improved! I think all of us who graduated from ESA 1 are better skiers than we were a year ago.
post #13 of 26
Thanks Oboe!
(whispers coming from the peanut gallery "If this is an improvment, I'd hate to see what she looked like BEFORE the academy!
)

Seriously, even if I did look the same, for me to ski without completely deteriorating in those conditions would be an accomplishment.

It helped to remember what Weems said last year, about not having the same expectations of our skiing under different conditions. Having skied almost powder like conditions at Sunday River the week before, I am, if anything, becoming infinitely more adaptable.
post #14 of 26
:
post #15 of 26
Maybe Bonni couldn't see any difference because she skied with you at the ESA last year and at the ETU this year too. Maybe if you are in different groups for ESA2 she will see a difference. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #16 of 26
We may well end up in different groups. With Bonni living near the slopes, not working, and able to ski every day, I'm guessing she'll practically be pretty close to expert by the time ESA2 comes around! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #17 of 26
HA! I don't think so! We skied last night, and it was cccold and half the lights were out. I'm learning in the dark.

Let's just say that you CAN ski by using your feet only! It's a good balancing and CM drill!

I'll have to get better if I put on the miles. We're going again today (In Daylight) and probably Monday night. I'm gettin spoiled.

Now, if only we were in a place that had good Snow instead of ceramic tiles......... [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Now, if only we were in a place that had good Snow instead of ceramic tiles.........
AH, New England!

You'll get used to it and you will actually be a better skier (more stable and more adaptable) because of it.

WE NEED SNOW! That's all I asked for this year! A nice CHRISTMAS snow storm!
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
AHEM, ladies - this thread is about ETU takeaways (learnings)!!

[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

Tea is being served in the room next door.



kiersten

sidenote: Bonni - seeing "blind" can be very liberating!!!
post #20 of 26
Things I learned at the ETU:

Once again, my couch potato fitness program failed despite ambidextrous channel surfing and increased ‘fridge sprints. I must try harder in the off season. I think I’ll add more beer.

There is no ice at Stowe.

There are two types of skiing at Stowe; easy skiing and good skiing. All three days were good skiing. (I got snowed in and just had to ski Monday.)

We would never address ice at a Western Epic Academy the way we did at Stowe.

I can now ski on ice, not merely over it to turn on a patch of loose, softer snow.

Two days of practicing ice tactics paid off in the deep. The skills are the same, the conditions dictate a different approach; even more patience at the top of the turn.

I am finally consistently leading with the outside edge of the inside ski and finishing my turns.

Tim Thompson (sp?) is a great addition to the Epic coaching staff. Watching him do the thousand step drill as he accelerates through the steps right up to the point where he is going uphill then steps to his downhill ski to transition to the next turn was really illuminating.

KevinF, Tamski, and Yaussic (sp?) are really good skiers. On my first run of the day, also my first run of the season, I knew I would be pushed by this group.

Being watch by Stu Campbell as he did the splits for the advanced group was not nearly as intimidating as I thought. I was too busy trying to find my stance on my skis to worry about anything other then keeping upright.

Our coaches are great skiers, what makes them great coaches are that they are knowledgeable, approachable, affable, outgoing, and are good communicators. I get the impression that even if skiing were not our common denominator, they would still be interesting people.

Ant likes Pottsville. PA’s own, Yuengling Beer.

The beer at The Shed is a little on the thin side, taste-wise.

There are other Steelers fans on the Stowe staff besides Epic.

Epic Bears are the most enthusiastic group I’ve ever skied with.

[img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by kieli:
AHEM, ladies - this thread is about ETU takeaways (learnings)!!

[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

Tea is being served in the room next door.



kiersten

sidenote: Bonni - seeing "blind" can be very liberating!!!
I'd say that for intermediate skiers, skiing on ice and looking half way decent has a bit more to do with "take aways and learnings" and a lot less to do with "tea."
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
LM - I was teasing you all for all the posts AFTER your post about the improvement on ice.

I agree that your takeaway is most valueable - in fact all skiers (at every level) posted about the "ice" and improved technique and confidence.

Happy Holidays,
kiersten
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Springhill Crazie:
[QB]Things I learned at the ETU:

I am finally consistently leading with the outside edge of the inside ski and finishing my turns.
QB]
What are you saying with "leading with the outside edge of the inside ski"?
I thought the inside ski was brought slightly back, not leading. Am I backwards?
thanks
post #24 of 26
Ryel, please take it to the instruction forum. [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #25 of 26
Ryel,

By "leading with the outside edge of the inside ski" we basically mean to tip the new inside ski towards the new turn. The new outside ski will simply follow, as will the whole CM. So basically we initiate (lead) with the outside edge (little toe edge) of the new inside ski. Does that make sense now?

As for "tip lead", you are right, it is desirable to eliminate that by bringing the new inside ski back.

We do both of these action together, more or less.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Ryel:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Springhill Crazie:
[QB]Things I learned at the ETU:

I am finally consistently leading with the outside edge of the inside ski and finishing my turns.
QB]
What are you saying with "leading with the outside edge of the inside ski"?
I thought the inside ski was brought slightly back, not leading. Am I backwards?
thanks
</font>[/quote]I mean to say that I am finally starting my turns by tipping the inside ski to the little toe side. I beleive that you are right in that the out side ski is physically leading. Really I haven't given it much attention as I feel my need to improve is in learning to use my inside ski to guide while riding the outside ski.

I wrote this earlier in the day and forgot to hit add reply. Now I see TomB has already answered. Boy, you gotta act fast around here to get a word in. You are right Tom, I meant I start my turn by tipping not pushing my inside ski forward as Ryel thought.

I learned a lesson here in the precise use of language. That and the adage that never do anything in front of your class that you don't want your clients to do. Once after doing a demo instead of stepping to face my group I jumped up and pivoted my skis in the air to face them. Well more then a few did exactly the same at the end of the drill. [img]redface.gif[/img]
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