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The kids are starting to ski, I am re-starting to ski? [northeast father] Hi everyone I need some help choosing a ski?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

Nice forum and i am hoping that you all can help point me in the right direction.

 

I am mid 40's 5''7" 195 lbs

Haven't put skis on in 18 years till this season when my daughter became interested. 

 

I have a few seasons under my belt in the past...distant past but this 1st season back I was able to cruise with confidence on green hills here in the north east on 150s rented without much bruising. I did find that i have adopted a lazier style. i don't push it like I used to when I was 20 up on mount snow and I dont think i want to. I find myself looking for speed once I get my confidence back mid dayish...or when chasing my 6 yo down the hill, that is when I think I want to buy a ski setup. I also hope to move my girl and her younger sister 2 1/2 to skiing a few bigger mountains like Snow in the near future...and I want to keep up...my girls have taken a real liking to this sport and through my lessons and lessons by the staff where we ski the 6 yo has progressed very well. yes the 2 yo has a kiddie ski too.

 

In short i think i need a beginner ski that I can take to the intermediate level in a yr or so. I won't be skiing powder out west and i think my days of a true all mountain skier are long past i would like to revisit some challenges on the mountain as I am sure my girls will. I believe the new style skies that i used, and i tried 145 150 156 160 are the range I am comfy with...150s were my go to.

 

I have narrowed my search to 3 ski models and will be searching boots for my 26.5 triple E foot. I have always had trouble with speed control when younger. I hope for a ski that is forgiving and like the idea of no grab tips as i do get lax sometimes. I like the more effortless turning boasted by alot of ski makers nowadays and I am confused as to really what width waist will be appropriate for me. I lean toward the Rossignol or the k2 then the volkl. I have rode none of these and hope to buy now as prices are low. I consider myself a brand new skier!

 

any advice is much appreciated. If I am way off the mark please don't hesitate to expound.

 

Thank You

Ian

 

 

 

Volkl RTM 73

 

K2 Force

 

Rossignol Experience 76 Ca

post #2 of 13

Welcome to the forum.  Get your boots right first.  Then you can demo some different ski options to get a feel for what you prefer. Gear has changed quite a bit.  You're really going to love it.  I dropped out of skiing about the same time you did and was able to pick it up in 2007.  Have fun!

post #3 of 13

I recently started taking my kid skiing after being off the mountain for 20 years.  We've a grand total of 5 days under our belts this season, and 3 last.  I'm 5'9'' and 160 lbs.  I recently found a pair of Rossignol Experience 78's in a 174 length for a very good deal used, and have been very pleased with them.  I'd say the primary features for this ski are the ease with which they make turns and their stability.  Coming off of old straight skis, I have found it effortless to learn to start making carved turns, and these skis are nice and stable.  I like speed when my kid will let me go, and have found these things to be absolutely stable at any speed. 

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkmauro View Post
 

Hello,

 

Nice forum and i am hoping that you all can help point me in the right direction.

 

I am mid 40's 5''7" 195 lbs

Haven't put skis on in 18 years till this season when my daughter became interested. 

 

I have a few seasons under my belt in the past...distant past but this 1st season back I was able to cruise with confidence on green hills here in the north east on 150s rented without much bruising. I did find that i have adopted a lazier style. i don't push it like I used to when I was 20 up on mount snow and I dont think i want to. I find myself looking for speed once I get my confidence back mid dayish...or when chasing my 6 yo down the hill, that is when I think I want to buy a ski setup. I also hope to move my girl and her younger sister 2 1/2 to skiing a few bigger mountains like Snow in the near future...and I want to keep up...my girls have taken a real liking to this sport and through my lessons and lessons by the staff where we ski the 6 yo has progressed very well. yes the 2 yo has a kiddie ski too.

 

In short i think i need a beginner ski that I can take to the intermediate level in a yr or so. I won't be skiing powder out west and i think my days of a true all mountain skier are long past i would like to revisit some challenges on the mountain as I am sure my girls will. I believe the new style skies that i used, and i tried 145 150 156 160 are the range I am comfy with...150s were my go to.

 

I have narrowed my search to 3 ski models and will be searching boots for my 26.5 triple E foot. I have always had trouble with speed control when younger. I hope for a ski that is forgiving and like the idea of no grab tips as i do get lax sometimes. I like the more effortless turning boasted by alot of ski makers nowadays and I am confused as to really what width waist will be appropriate for me. I lean toward the Rossignol or the k2 then the volkl. I have rode none of these and hope to buy now as prices are low. I consider myself a brand new skier!

 

any advice is much appreciated. If I am way off the mark please don't hesitate to expound.

 

Thank You

Ian

 

Volkl RTM 73

K2 Force

Rossignol Experience 76 Ca

Welcome to EpicSki!  I'm going to move this thread to Ski Gear where you are more likely to get replies.

 

If you want recommendations for a boot fitter, then need to know where you live.  Have you read any of the EpicSki articles about buying gear?  Click on Articles in the menu bar next to Unofficial Guides.

 

I was completely away from skiing for 10 years, then didn't ski much as a working adult.  Started out in earnest when my daughter was 4.  I was over 50 then and had retired early.  With more time on snow in recent years and high level lessons, I'm skiing far harder terrain than before.  No need to settle for being a terminal intermediate.

post #5 of 13

I posted a similar thread a few months back.  I had been away from skiing for 18 years as well and only had about 1 season under my belt back then.  I immediately found that my wife and kids loved the slopes, who were all first-timers except for myself.  I initial thought we'd ski 7-10 days a year.  We started in January and have about 16 days so far and will add a few more before the season ends.  I ski in Virginia and up at Jay Peak (we have family at both ends.)

 

I was given advice and I'll happily pass it along to you.  Boots first.  I completely agree, and you should not just buy boots, but find a pro to fit them for you.  Think of the bootfitting process as a series of multiple visits back to the bootfitter to get your boot right.  Check out this sight... 

http://www.bootfitters.com/  Bootfitters have specialized equipment so they can adapt the boot to your foot.  Plain retailers do not have that equipment.  You can search boots by last (width) and get an idea of what you might be looking at for boots.  If you have fitting or boot questions go to the "ask the boot guys" forum on here.

 

I was told to demo, demo, demo.  I understand the logic, but it just wasn't a good fit for me since I had planned an additional 10 ski days after we got started.  I started doing the math and it didn't make sense.  The thing that pushed me over the edge was a ski rental employee that didn't set up my rental bindings properly.  I decided that day that I was buying my skis and they would be maintained by someone I know.  Additionally, I didn't really want to change skis every time I went skiing.  The 1 1/2 hour wait in line for equipment didn't help either.  There's a lot of moving parts when you bring kids to the slopes.  Having your own equipment makes things a bit easier. 

 

I did rent a Head Rev 75 and eventually bought a pair of Head Rev 78's.  I don't know if all my rentals were crap or not, but the first day on my new skis felt fantastic.  I don't really have any regrets.  I'm taller than you and about 10lbs. heavier.  I bought the skis in 163.  I intentionally bought them on the short side to help with my learning process.  No doubt, I could have gone longer and I don't think it would have been an issue.  Starting out, I think most suggest to find a ski length that falls between your chin and nose.  As you progress the ski get's longer.  As far as ski width... I was told to stay in the 78-83 range for my type of skiing and ability.  That might apply to you as well.

 

Can't help you with the skis you're looking at. 

 

Good luck.

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

I am on Long Island NY

I have been taking the kids west to shawnee, and I have a place close by to make a short trip to local mountains...blue, camelback.

I plan on squeezing more out of this season and will start heading north, butternut.

 

I will get that profile done and should've mentioned location on the 1st post.

 

 

crgildart Thanks, I am liking these skis and skiing with my children and niece too at times has been such rewarding family time, what a change, so technically fun to consider the options with shape of skis now, I think it is what makes me want to push it sometimes...

 

northernflicker...same is happening here.. we are pushing 2 trips a week with my daughter leading the charge...she is in a homeschooling cooperative sorta stretching her gym time into one full day of gym..lol. I am leaning toward the Rossignol experience 76...I could have bought a pair already with the rentals. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

 

I was completely away from skiing for 10 years, then didn't ski much as a working adult.  Started out in earnest when my daughter was 4.  I was over 50 then and had retired early.  With more time on snow in recent years and high level lessons, I'm skiing far harder terrain than before.  No need to settle for being a terminal intermediate.

marznc Thanks for moving the post...and to the advice, you are right terminal intermediate doesn't sound so fun anymore your is inspiring.... Yes the feet...have always hurt in boots. My local shop wouldn't even touch them and suggested the professional fitter. They are family owned and am glad now after reading here how important this is that they wanted me to have happy feet...now that I have read and re read  articles here and went right to the link that DirtViking posted i am off to get some comfy boots...finally. Thanks all

 

 

As for skis :

I also have the opportunity to acquire a 2007 rx8 titanium at 165 in real nice condition. Im afraid it might be a big leap at first but the more I read and from what i have been told by that ski shop it seems my weight, i am a solid exercise 6 days a week, pushing 200 lbs at 67.5 inches, might play a roll in making a ski with new tech not as effective. ?? The Rossignoll is at least rated to 195lbs, and seems by what I have read to be a more appropriate beginner ski than the rx8. The rx8 reads like the ski i would want but 165??? and for 200.00?

 

I keep negotiating with myself, well if they are a front and rear rocker ski the length is not really 165 unless leaning into a turn?

 

Any thoughts about that length, my calculated average optimal ski length seems to be 163 at beginner.

 

Any thoughts about buying a 7 yo ski ? Is tech just as impressive when talking a 400 rossignol exp 76?

 

Thanks in advance

post #7 of 13

I don't know anything about men's skis, but generally it's better to find skis that are 2-3 years old, so something from 2007 is borderline as being a good deal.  That said, my first shaped skis were very cheap former rental skis that were good enough when skiing half the time with a preschooler.  That way I avoided having to rent and gave myself another season to learn enough to decide what to buy.

 

As for learning technique, if there is a package deal for group lessons that includes lift ticket and rental, might be worth it.  Especially mid-week.  You can still use your own boots.  But that's assuming the rental fleet includes skis that are long enough for your size.  Big guys can have problems finding rental boots and skis that fit.  I know of small ski areas where the longest rental ski is 146cm.  Even beginner is better off with skis that come up to their chin by the 3rd or 4th time skiing.  If they are having trouble, it's not the skis but lack of technique.  Quickest way to learn how to turn and stay in control is to take a lesson or two.

post #8 of 13

Getting gear for growing kids is a completely different story.

 

Take a look at the advice from the Family Skiing section:

http://www.epicski.com/t/92869/money-time-saving-tips-for-parents-with-small-children-who-ski

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks...the kids are set with equipment , private and group lessons. the packages made most sense. When in class, I get a chance to squeeze as many runs from the top in as i can.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkmauro View Post

 

I also have the opportunity to acquire a 2007 rx8 titanium at 165 in real nice condition. Im afraid it might be a big leap at first but the more I read and from what i have been told by that ski shop it seems my weight, i am a solid exercise 6 days a week, pushing 200 lbs at 67.5 inches, might play a roll in making a ski with new tech not as effective. ?? The Rossignoll is at least rated to 195lbs, and seems by what I have read to be a more appropriate beginner ski than the rx8. The rx8 reads like the ski i would want but 165??? and for 200.00?

 

I keep negotiating with myself, well if they are a front and rear rocker ski the length is not really 165 unless leaning into a turn?

 

Any thoughts about that length, my calculated average optimal ski length seems to be 163 at beginner.

 

Any thoughts about buying a 7 yo ski ? Is tech just as impressive when talking a 400 rossignol exp 76?

 

Thanks in advance

I'd forget about the rx8's. They were great skis when they came out, but they were intended for someone skiing at a higher level than where you're at right now and $200 for a 7 year old ski seems crazy to me.  Something like the rossi exp 76 would probably be good.  There are tons of deals out there now so I'd look around.  Something like a Fischer Motive 74 or 76 might fit the bill.  Here's a 2013 Motive 76 brand new with binding for under $300 shipped after the 20% discount is applied.  74's would be a few dollars less.

 

http://www.the-house.com/8954fim76rpas13zz-fischer-ski-packages.html

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks All!

 

I went to The House and ordered a pair of Rossi E76 156cm. Now to the boot fitter. I have orthotics made 2x a yr for hiking boots that are not very flexible and a set for cross-training sneakers. i am curious as to how the fitter will address my comfort issue. I will speak to them first and offer that i bring both sets in for reference if needed.

 

Thanks Again, Very nice place to a new member. I hope I can post my experiences with  new ski, fitter and others to contribute in return.

post #12 of 13

I'm surprised no one else said this, but I'd suggest going a little longer at your weight.  Longer skis are not hard to ski on and they give a bit more stability.  But maybe this post is too late!

post #13 of 13

Yeah, if possible, I'd look at a longer length.  156 is likely too short for you right now and you'll know doubt outgrow them quickly.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › The kids are starting to ski, I am re-starting to ski? [northeast father] Hi everyone I need some help choosing a ski?