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How to SKI: bumps - Page 5

post #121 of 135

One item to consider is the bindings themselves. I used to have markers but they pre-released when I would hit a bump with low impact. The old Markers always had issues but I have heard their Royal family is good.

 

I went to a Look/Rossi binding b/c it has some "give" with the elasticity travel, never had the problem on low impact hits. Recently,  I've had pre releases when I skied more aggressively on hardpack, so I turned it up one level and never had an issue since. And yeah, I did spin out bad when I skied in and out from an icy section in the mogul field.... it released as it should with out twisting my knee. In my case turning it up to .5 to 1 was not a big deal.

post #122 of 135

Thanks jack97. Got these skies used so I'm not even sure what brand of binding these are. Another reason to have someone at the pro-shop take a look at it.

post #123 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post

Just needed some advise and didn't want to start another thread.

I was in some bumps over the weekend when both my skis disengaged. I'm 5'8", 138 lbs. My bindings were set at DIN 7.0. I probably hit the bump at a more intense angle than I had meant to but I feel I could have recovered if my skis didn't disengage. Should I use a tighter setting or will that rip my legs off next time I crash?

No. Have the forward tension adjustment on your binding checked.
post #124 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 

Thanks for the advice, bttocs. I'll get the bindings checked.

When you got the skis, did you have the binding adjusted to your (current) boots?

 

 

You can have the DIN "correct" but if the forward pressure is wrong they wont perform as they should.

IF a shop did the adjustment, they should have checked forward pressure at the same time.

post #125 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by docbrad66 View Post
 

When you got the skis, did you have the binding adjusted to your (current) boots?

 

 

You can have the DIN "correct" but if the forward pressure is wrong they wont perform as they should.

IF a shop did the adjustment, they should have checked forward pressure at the same time.


Ummm... I set the bindings. I think my boots were 297 and I set it to 300. DIN was already set to 7. Probably should have it checked.

post #126 of 135

if you can set the bindings you can set the forward pressure - google on some youtube videos

but typically there is screw on the heel piece that needs to align with an index mark or the back of the heel piece

 

Not recommending this as a general rule but you already set the binding and the DIN....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Prgjdi4SFMk

post #127 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 


Ummm... I set the bindings. I think my boots were 297 and I set it to 300. DIN was already set to 7. Probably should have it checked.


 Forward tension issue... problem solved. Have someone who knows what they're doing show you how.

post #128 of 135
I had a Tyrolia demo binding that pre-released in the bumps all the time.  The DIN was right, the forward pressure was right, passed the shop torque test.  But at least once a day in the bumps I'd have a wile-e-coyote moment where I'd look down to see one ski gone and have just enough time to hold up a yipes sign before tumbling down on my ass.  Frustrating as hell...glad to finally get rid of em.
post #129 of 135

^^^  Not all bindings were designed in the same manner. Skiers who do the park or moguls want their bindings with some elastic travel both in the toe and heel pieces. 

post #130 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post

 

I was in some bumps over the weekend when both my skis disengaged. I'm 5'8", 138 lbs. My bindings were set at DIN 7.0. I probably hit the bump at a more intense angle than I had meant to but I feel I could have recovered if my skis didn't disengage. Should I use a tighter setting or will that rip my legs off next time I crash?

At your height and weight, I would be cautious about raising the DIN above its current setting.

 

As others have mentioned, forward pressure is a Big Deal, especially with some Marker bindings from a few years ago. I routinely had trouble with demo Markers when decambering a ski in a trough.

 

However, I now have one pair of skis with Markers that are properly set up, and I do not have trouble with them in bumps, powder or trees. Maybe my skiing has improved, or I'm a weenie who no longer skis hard enough. I use 7 on the toe, 6 on the heel. I'm 5'11", 165 lb. I am able to twist out of them while standing still.

post #131 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
 

At your height and weight, I would be cautious about raising the DIN above its current setting.

 

As others have mentioned, forward pressure is a Big Deal, especially with some Marker bindings from a few years ago. I routinely had trouble with demo Markers when decambering a ski in a trough.

 

However, I now have one pair of skis with Markers that are properly set up, and I do not have trouble with them in bumps, powder or trees. Maybe my skiing has improved, or I'm a weenie who no longer skis hard enough. I use 7 on the toe, 6 on the heel. I'm 5'11", 165 lb. I am able to twist out of them while standing still.


Thanks. I'll get the bindings checked next time.

post #132 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 


Ummm... I set the bindings. I think my boots were 297 and I set it to 300. DIN was already set to 7. Probably should have it checked.

My buddies say they have a friend who can mount my bindings for a sixpack and look at me like I have two heads when I say no thanks, I'll pay the $45.

 

That connection has my ACL's destiny in it's quality, my life in some circumstances and I think $45 is cheap compared to saving a few bucks.

 

Or look at it this way, next time they prerelease, wouldn't you think that $45 is worth it?

post #133 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

My buddies say they have a friend who can mount my bindings for a sixpack and look at me like I have two heads when I say no thanks, I'll pay the $45.

 

That connection has my ACL's destiny in it's quality, my life in some circumstances and I think $45 is cheap compared to saving a few bucks.

 

Or look at it this way, next time they prerelease, wouldn't you think that $45 is worth it?

 

... and the key advantage being that you can drink that six pack yourself.

post #134 of 135

Just a quick update. I took my skis to a mountain I used to go to a lot. I have had a good rapport with the guy at the pro shop. He took one look at the bindings and told me they were set incorrectly. I'm not sure what he did, it involved a series of clicking and sliding different parts of the binding I had no idea could be clicked and slid. Then he said, $45... NO! He said, NO CHARGE!!! I left him a good tip. Had a fun day in the bumps with decent amount of air and landings at all angles. Never came off once. Moral: Proper binding setup is worth $45 or more, but when it comes free of charge, it's AWESOME!!!

 

Thank you all.

post #135 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 

Just a quick update. I took my skis to a mountain I used to go to a lot. I have had a good rapport with the guy at the pro shop. He took one look at the bindings and told me they were set incorrectly. I'm not sure what he did, it involved a series of clicking and sliding different parts of the binding I had no idea could be clicked and slid. Then he said, $45... NO! He said, NO CHARGE!!! I left him a good tip. Had a fun day in the bumps with decent amount of air and landings at all angles. Never came off once. Moral: Proper binding setup is worth $45 or more, but when it comes free of charge, it's AWESOME!!!

 

Thank you all.

That sounds like the forward pressure was wrong.  It’s not hard to adjust.  Raising a tab in the back allows the heel piece to move, and you have to put it in the right spot.  There’s an arrow or a line on the heel piece that has to be within a set of bars or window when the boot is in the binding.  If the arrow doesn’t line up, then you take out the boot, move the heel piece and try again until it lines up.  The binding holds the boot in place with a spring tension, and this tension must be right for the bindings to work properly.  The distance the heel piece moves when putting the boot in the binding determines the tension on the spring, so the starting position is critical for getting the right tension.  Too far back will not give enough tension and too far forward will give too much.

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