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Ski discoloration question

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hi :)

 

After years of not skiing (since 2006) I dusted off and had professionally re-edged, a set of old-school Volkl P40 F1's with evergYrail configuration. The white has yellowed with age, but there's no crazing, cracks or signs of delamination anywhere throughout the ski body.

 

Is there a way I can bring back the white again? Is the discoloration in the gelcoat, as I suspect, or is it going to be deeper?

 

Thanks,
Kelsie


Edited by kelsiej - 3/10/14 at 11:34am
post #2 of 16

Your skis are 15 years old. You have bigger issues to worry about.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Really? It's not as if I'm skiing on a pair of Dynamic VR-17's from back in 1978 that are delaminating from being so old…..they're made with the same technology as newer skis so why not ski on them till they break? If I'd asked for what similar skis are out now, then your answer would be partially valid - "they're 15 yrs old, you should try XXXX skis",  but your snobby response doesn't answer my question. Srsly.

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsiej View Post
 

Hi :)

 

After years of not skiing (since 2006) I dusted off and had professionally re-edged, a set of old-school Volkl P40 F1's with evergYrail configuration. The white has yellowed with age, but there's no crazing, cracks or signs of delamination anywhere throughout the ski body.

 

Is there a way I can bring back the white again? Is the discoloration in the gelcoat, as I suspect, or is it going to be deeper?

 

Thanks,
Kelsie


I doubt that you'll get a reliable answer to your question about discoloration.  Buy some skis that are 5 years old.  You'll think you've died and gone to heaven, and it won't cost much money either. 

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks Posaune,

 

Your answer was a little more friendly than "you got problems", lol. Frankly, I don't like more modern skis. I hate the wide blades and negative camber modern skis. I like what I like - when I was skiing every day almost back in the day, I was on 205 Olin Mk VI's. I just like a straight or predominantly straight feeling sticks because to me, they do what I tell them to do. I don't want a ski that does it for me.

 

I'll figure something out I'm sure

post #6 of 16

Kelsie,

I grew up working in and eventually owned a ski shop that happened to sell Volkls. Kastles, Authiers, Dynastars, and Rossignol.  Many of their "favored skis" over the years were white.  That is especially true of the earlier years.  All that being said, we had many customers with their beloved favorite skis come in with the same question.  We were never able to buff, clean, or will the yellowing out.  A few of the companies offered factory refinishing via their warranty/refurbishing centers in Salt Lake City.  I believe that's the only way your skis will see white again.  Unfortunately, I'm fairly sure your ski's paint job screen has long since gone the way of the buffalo.  Maybe they can get them white and put on a newer paint job, but then again, the screens would be for a much different sidecut and probably not fit.  I would ride them with pride and forget about the lack of pearly white.

Take care,

Bob

post #7 of 16

Is this purely cosmetic issue a real problem? I suspect the discoloration is due to UV damage on the paint and you can do nothing about. I would not waste time worrying about such an issue...

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks Bob, I'll just ski on them and enjoy :)

post #9 of 16

Most here would be more worried about 15 year old bindings than 15 year skis.  Regardless, many others still love to rock the old school stuff.  I recently retired some classics myself.  If I had more room to store and more days to ski I'd still use them from time to time..

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsiej View Post
 

Thanks Posaune,

 

Your answer was a little more friendly than "you got problems", lol. Frankly, I don't like more modern skis. I hate the wide blades and negative camber modern skis. I like what I like - when I was skiing every day almost back in the day, I was on 205 Olin Mk VI's. I just like a straight or predominantly straight feeling sticks because to me, they do what I tell them to do. I don't want a ski that does it for me.

 

I'll figure something out I'm sure

Been there, done that, made the switch from 205 Blizzard Thermo RS to Dynastar Speed Course FIS about 3 years ago.  Still love the Thermo's, but the thrill of the new skis provide once you adapt, there is no comparision.

 

A new shorter race or near race ski will do the same as the 205's and then some.  The difference between the race and the civilian skis are how forgiving they are.   The race (near race) skis need to be skied or they will bite you (sort of like the old straights).  They won't lead you around unless you tell them what you want.

 

So enjoy the old (I still do) and really enjoy the new.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

Your skis are 15 years old. You have bigger issues to worry about.

Seriously. UV discolors plastics, and white shows it the most. My wife's older Kastles are showing the same thing, and they're all of 4 years old. I'd worry more about getting the edges and bases in shape. But buying new gear?

 

You don't like new gear because the designs reward new styles of skiing. In particular, modern designs are more about carving comparatively deep radius turns, while older straight skis like to brush turns under 40 m unless you're a former WC racer. Older skis love to straightline, newer ones love to turn. So that changes your mechanics, stance, everything. You'd need to take some lessons and modify your style to really enjoy the new designs.That's pricey. If you don't ski that much, and like your equipment, what's the point? Enjoy the snow while we still have any...

post #12 of 16

Not having skied in eight years was the bigger issue.

post #13 of 16

Hmmm. I'd have to think about that. I had a stretch in my life where I was in a very very flat place, tried to ski but landfill wasn't making it, so I stopped. Time went by. About five years. Then I ended up in the east, clicked into my trusty VR17's and went to Killington, first run was right under the main lift at what is today K-1. As I recall, the yard sale, even the twisted ankle, was pretty similar to what happened to me at Squaw, six years earlier. 

 

I take away from this the following propositions:

 

1) We cling to our habits like a bad toupee. They don't disappear just because we stop using them. 

 

2) The equipment we're most familiar with will lead to the most familiar outcomes. This is comforting. Even on crutches.

 

3) Only on Epic would we advise people to buy new gear after not skiing, rather than taking lessons...

post #14 of 16

Beyond, the advice wasn't to buy new only that the OP might like the new.  I switched under similar circumstances because of the right priced gear came along and loved the result.

 

The similarity of the old straight and the Race (or cheater skis) skis is that they must be skied, which is what was required with the old straight.  I've skied on advanced modern skis and find them too limp and generally over ski them (old habits die hard) decreasing the performance and joy factor.  I think that this is what the OP has experienced with modern skis and I don't blame his assessment in that regard as I had the same until I got on full blown race :yahoo: and haven't looked back.

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Seriously. UV discolors plastics, and white shows it the most. My wife's older Kastles are showing the same thing, and they're all of 4 years old. I'd worry more about getting the edges and bases in shape. But buying new gear?

 

You don't like new gear because the designs reward new styles of skiing. In particular, modern designs are more about carving comparatively deep radius turns, while older straight skis like to brush turns under 40 m unless you're a former WC racer. Older skis love to straightline, newer ones love to turn. So that changes your mechanics, stance, everything. You'd need to take some lessons and modify your style to really enjoy the new designs.That's pricey. If you don't ski that much, and like your equipment, what's the point? Enjoy the snow while we still have any...


That's great advice, and exactly how I feel :)

post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

Yes, I'm familiar

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

Not having skied in eight years was the bigger issue.



That's part of my reluctance - I ski a certain way based on previous on and off-piste experience. I used to teach skiing at Oxygene, Val d'Isere. Fr...........and then came the snowboarders lol!

I like knowing what the outcome will be when I ski, especially after having not skied in so long. It's safer for me to know where I am on the snow at any given time, rather than worry about the age of bindings. Believe me, I check them thoroughly every time I strap them on.

 

I will invest in a new pair of sticks next season, but for now I'm getting back into the comfort zone.

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