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Marker Griffon different DINs for heel setting on each side?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I just bought Volkl Kenja with Marker Griffon.  I got them back from the shop and checked the DIN.  My DIN is 8 and the toe is set correct. But the heel is at 7 on one ski and the other is 6!  Is there any explainable reason for this?  I obviously have limited knowledge here.  I see where they wrote down a lot of numbers checking for final release/retention settings on each toe and heel.  I am waiting for the technician to arrive at the shop this morning but would like to be educated first.  Is there a legit explanation for this?  If they indeed forgot to set the heel DIN at 8, should I have them retest the entire  binding?  Appreciate some input before I call the shop.  I am really uneasy about this.  Thanks.

post #2 of 8
Yeah there's an explanation for it...they forgot to do the heels. Why not just adjust the screw in the heels to 8 yourself?
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by luke21079 View Post

Yeah there's an explanation for it...they forgot to do the heels.

binding release test done with torque wrench. Each number on the DIn correspond with  torque  setting. So it is possible to have different number. Anyhow shop should inform you on the reason why din different and it should be written in the ticket. I would go and ask

post #4 of 8
It is possible that the settings need to be different in order to be correct for you and the boot, especially if these are used skis. I used to have a pair of bindings that had been moved from one set of skis to another and one setting was different than the others to achieve the desired release in the torque tests. Which were done with some gismo with a meter on it.
post #5 of 8

Don't count on the scale on the binding to be accurate.  If the shop tech correctly tested the binding, then he set them at the correct spot for the info sheet you filled out.  Mark those scales on the binding at the spot that works for you and ignore the numbers.  But if the tech didn't correctly set the bindings....:(

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

I talked to the technician and feel much better now.  When he did the torque test, he moved to 6 and 7 on the heel because the torque test had the binding release at a range outside of what is considered to be an 8 DIN.  So my bindings are set to release at 8 DIN ranges even though it doesn't read that on the binding.  I think this is why every DIN chart says 'a qualified binding technician should set your bindings'.   Thanks for the feedback - can't wait to try out my new skis!

post #7 of 8
I remember someone here who's a tech said that if a binding tested to not having the correct release value for the DIN, they just fail it instead of compensating. Guess that's not a universal practice.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

I remember someone here who's a tech said that if a binding tested to not having the correct release value for the DIN, they just fail it instead of compensating. Guess that's not a universal practice.

Technically speaking...it is a fail. BUT that doesn't mean that it's unsafe or can't be used.  The spring rate of the binding SHOULD directly correlate to a given amount of "work" to make the binding release.  I mentioned this in another thread but, the binding release value is measured in Newton meters which corresponds to the amount of "work" which takes place in order for the spring to compress far enough to release the boot out of the binding.  The tech in this case did exactly what he should have...except for informing the owner of the test failure and subsequent adjustments.  

 

When a ski fails to test to the correct release value, it should be noted on the binding form which the customer fills out, and the tech should do what this one did, continue testing and making adjustments until a suitable spring compression value releases the boot at the correct release value. Because the binding was originally set at an 8 but didn't release within the correct test values, it would be a failure and should be marked as such, but a tech can and should continue to test and reevaluate the releases at different indicator values.  Once that value has been found, in this case 6 on one heel and 7 on the other, it should again be indicated on the binding form.  The tech, or whoever waited on you when you picked up your skis, should have then informed you of the issues and the fix and had you initial the form indicating you understood what transpired...but this is lawyer stuff, not really performance stuff.  

 

It becomes a little sketchy when you have to move 2-3 binding indicator values away from what is recommended by the DIN chart (for example having a recommended value of 6 and having to move to a 9 to get a good test).  A good tech would question this and discuss the options with the owner.  I personally wouldn't continue to ride a binding that required me to move 2 or more indicator values away from recommended.  I'd want to know what was going on with the spring and the internals that would cause them to be acting in that manner.  That's my opinion and personal preference, if the binding repeatedly releases correctly and consistently then it shouldn't be an issue.  

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