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Fritschi Freeride Pros on Mantras

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I've just been given a pair of Fritschi Freeride pro bindings that I was thinking of mounting on a pair of 184 Mantras that I already have. I'll be using the ski as an occasional tourer, accessing backcountry and also as day to day ski. I'm currently using the ski with a pair of Saloman STH 14 so even though I know the Freeride Pro won't perform as well in an alpine setting as the STH 14 I dont want to move too far away from the alpine performance side. Does anyone out there have any experience with this set up and can the binding cope with alpine skiing as well as touring? 

post #2 of 13

I've never skied the "Pro", but I didn't really like the regular freeride.  I vastly prefer my dukes for alpine performance.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
The Duke would be ideal. Heavier but better as an all round option.
post #4 of 13

I used first-generation Mantras with Fritchi bindings and found the setup was a bit heavy for serious touring.  With Dukes it is an appropriate setup for short skins into lift-served backcountry or a hike out, again en even heavier setup, but stout for downhill.  Are you using alpine touring boots, or at least boots with a walk mode with these?

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
I have the RX 130 but will probably get a hybrid as opposed to a touring boot. Probably a Lange XT 130 or a Cochise. I'd be using the set up for 2-3 hr skins maximum so I'm inclined to trade the Fritchis in for the duke option.
post #6 of 13

I have the Fritchis and use them for both resort and a bit of backcountry skinning.  Have to say you may be better served with the Dukes.  The plastic piece that holds the back of the rail to the ski develops some slop over time and I can't see a way to fix it.  I asked at a shop that carries a lot of BC gear and they also said there was no way to fix it and it is common with those bindings. I have also experienced the same piece letting go of the back of the binding so I am all of the sudden freehealing.  Usually don;t fall but it feels strange.  I have fond a way to wire the bindings so this can;t happen and just unwire when in BC.

 

So while I know nothing about Dukes or any other BC bindings I do know I will not purchase Fritchis again.

 

PS:  I love my Technica Cochise boots.

post #7 of 13

All it costs you is a set of mounting holes in a metal topped ski.  There is a bit of slop in the Fritschi binding and the stand-height is really high.  I was able to ski it and enjoy it inbounds, as long as conditions are reasonably soft.  It's tolerable, especially with a good boot.  I'd say go for it as long as you understand the trade-offs,

post #8 of 13

I personally think they are crap for skiing inbounds.....

 

 

why not just use inserts? and run both bindings...

post #9 of 13

If you don't care about weight and want to use them in the resort and side country, just go all in and get the Atomic Tracker / Solly Guardian.  A bit heavier than Dukes (not much) but they ski just like your STH's... same toe piece even on the new ones (minus the bars of course).

 

Or like Josh said, use inserts.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisschris View Post

I've just been given a pair of Fritschi Freeride pro bindings that I was thinking of mounting on a pair of 184 Mantras that I already have. I'll be using the ski as an occasional tourer, accessing backcountry and also as day to day ski. I'm currently using the ski with a pair of Saloman STH 14 so even though I know the Freeride Pro won't perform as well in an alpine setting as the STH 14 I dont want to move too far away from the alpine performance side. Does anyone out there have any experience with this set up and can the binding cope with alpine skiing as well as touring? 
My first AT setup - and not any AT maven - believe it or not was old Fritschis on old Mantras. In retrospect, barely meh, and if you don't want to sacrifice much downhill performance then cannot see this. Go find some used Dukes, or take the F's and mount them on some touring skis. Mantras are really wasted with bindings that flex this much...
post #11 of 13

I've used Dukes and Freeride + over a 6 year period and if you have to use a frame binding, go with the Marker Tour 10/12.  Frame bindings are pretty meh when it comes to going up but the Markers ski much better that the Freeride.

 

But if you are serious about AT'ing you will most likely end up on tech gear eventually (Dynafit etc).  I finally swapped to tech bindings last S/H winter and ended up not sking my alpine skis once, including using tech bindings inbounds. This year I will swap the heavy Technica Cochise boots for a much lighter offering (most likely Dynafit Vulcan).


Edited by Taxman - 3/9/14 at 3:09am
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your feedback and suggestions. This has given me a clear idea about what I'll do. Which is use a pair of Dukes on the Mantras and save the Fritchis for a complete touring set up.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisschris View Post

Thanks for all your feedback and suggestions. This has given me a clear idea about what I'll do. Which is use a pair of Dukes on the Mantras and save the Fritchies for a complete touring set up.

 

Chris, I would not let a free pair of bindings dictate the direction of my MAJOR INVESTMENT in AT gear.  You will spend plenty of money between skis, boots, bindings, skins, crampons, pack, safety gear and perhaps training.  As suggested by Taxman, the way to go now is Dynafit bindings and compatible AT boots.  This gives you the lightest possible gear for the uphill, and very positive, non-slop attachment to the skis for the downhill.  Frankly, the Fritsche technology is what was "best" when I started AT skiing, and once Dynafit hit the scene in the 21st century, that was the way to go for best performance and lowest fatigue.  For inbounds and sidecountry with minor hikes, I think you're on the right track.

 

I wish you all the best in your quest to undertake backcountry and sidecountry skiing.  It's a wonderful thing.  If you haven't already done so, do some reading on backcountry safety and start looking into some Avy I training courses. Most importantly, hook up with a partner that will go skiing with you.  Backcountry can be done solo, but it's safer in small groups, especially when starting out.

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