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First time backcountry

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have never backcountry skied before and was wondering wher a good place to start was. I usually ski Eldora and can sufficiently do all the ex runs there. I was also wondering what the difficulty level of silverton is.

post #2 of 7
Have you taken any courses about avalanche safety, bought all the equipment, etc.? If so, then start out with people who know the area and have experience. This is not a casual choice. I'm betting the dude that leveled the house in Missoula was just as casual about it.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by henrydpf999 View Post
 

I have never backcountry skied before and was wondering wher a good place to start was. I usually ski Eldora and can sufficiently do all the ex runs there. I was also wondering what the difficulty level of silverton is.

 

THE place to start is to take a class and buy gear.

 

The easiest lines at Silverton (Tiger 1-5, Tiger Main) are similar to Pali at Arapahoe Basin. The East (back) side gets very wild. Most of the slide paths on the West side neck down to 45* pitches tighter than a ski width (with blue ice down the middle in some cases) or they end in an ice fall or cliff altogether.

post #4 of 7

Just to be clear, skiing at Silverton is not skiing backcountry.

post #5 of 7
The best place to start is to get a reliable and experienced mentor. You can rent these - they're called guides - but going into the bc is such a complex and potentially hazardous place that a newbie needs a companion that knows what is going on and can help the newbie learn to enjoy themselves and to keep out of trouble. If you don't have a mentor on hand, take an avy class and be friendly.

Silverton has no beginner or intermediate runs.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by henrydpf999 View Post
 

I have never backcountry skied before and was wondering wher a good place to start was. I usually ski Eldora and can sufficiently do all the ex runs there. I was also wondering what the difficulty level of silverton is.

 

 

How well do you ski powder, crud, wind blown mank and/or any other variable conditions that you may encounter?

Once your comfortable skiing these conditions and in relatively good shape. Then a guided day at Silverton, could be a good introduction to BC.

 

We were out skiing Zone 7 and had to ford a stream.  Climbing out of the stream bed with 20ft high snowbanks,  was much harder than any hike we did.

post #7 of 7

Take an introductory back-country class, plenty of them in Colorado.

 

This should give you the basics.

 

After a few of these you will be ready for an AVY 1 course.

 

You can avoid all the training/classwork above but you may kill yourself or others in the learning process :eek

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