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what is a good boot to go with ross avenger 82 ti?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

just got a great deal for some '11 ross avenger 82 ti's and am looking to match them with a nice, comfortable, light boot.  been eyeing the Full Tilt Tom Wallisch's but would like some opinions before buying a 'softer' boot to go with an intermediate/expert ski like the rossignol.  i am 6', 240lb, and ski the trails 100% of the time, live in the midwest, but WILL be going to steamboat (for the first time) in a couple of weeks!!!

 

thanks for the knowledge.

berbes

post #2 of 24
the one the fits your feet! all the rest doesn't matter including the skis you are gonna ski...

go see a boot fitter!
post #3 of 24

This ^^^^.

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 

answers like that make great forums like this pointless. 

 

of course putting on a model selected by a professional fitter is the best thing to do for the best feel.  i am asking for general boot selection knowledge a newbie should have (with the ski i just bought), before relying on a fitter that might be skewed towards their end-of-the-season inventory.

 

 

to rephrase my question:

 

the rossi avenger 82 ti 170 cm are listed as a somewhat stiff, and rated intermediate advanced-expert.  if these were your skis, what boot would you like to pair it with and why, keeping in mind you want light & comfortable boots?  i appreciate the opinions.

post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post
 

answers like that make great forums like this pointless. 

 

of course putting on a model selected by a professional fitter is the best thing to do for the best feel.  i am asking for general boot selection knowledge a newbie should have (with the ski i just bought), before relying on a fitter that might be skewed towards their end-of-the-season inventory.

 

 

to rephrase my question:

 

if these were your skis, what boot would you like to pair it with and why?  i appreciate the opinions.

^^^^  This is pointless.  Height/weight/skill will get you close to what you need in terms of flex.  But every boot manufacturer makes different-flex boots.  The single most important element of boots is how they fit and work with your anatomy.  Period.  No issues of design, buckles, color trump having boots that fit like the proverbial glove. Manufacturers and sales-folk may tell you that certain boots are "best"; if they tell you that....RUN!  There is only one major criteria for "best": and that's the one already enunciated by mfa81.  

 

Only after you have skied for a long time on several pairs of boots that fit really, really well might you (maybe) decide that one feature or element of one boot distinguishes it enough to warrant buying that one.  

And the idea of matching boots to skis.....ridiculous.  

post #6 of 24
Just go with the red ones...
post #7 of 24

berbes: Go to a good shop that fits boots, there will be a bunch of factors he and you will need to figure out to see what type of boot you need, the obvious as stated above is the one that fits and feels the best, but then there are other factors like stiffness and in your case what you are doing you won't need a super stiff boot, unless of course you plan on doing racing. Seems they changed the flex scaling on me now I see a rating of 1-10 scale when did we switch to this? lol  Well according to the specs on that its a 6 out of 10, so its not too stiff and not too soft. Don't worry about matching a boot to a ski, unless you want to be the most color courdinated person on the Mountain! ;)  Interesting Ski as they say its just like there world cup FIS but a tad wider. 

post #8 of 24

I had the Avengers & Head Raptor boots(there were Red) it work fine.

post #9 of 24

The idea of having a ski boot is to create control of the skis you're on.  Since it is the interface between the foot/leg, which is biological and infinitely variable among individuals, and the ski/binding which is not, the boot needs to fit your body, not the ski.  All boots match all skis if you get the fit right.  You just have to figure out what boot works for you.  Do not look to match skis and boots, match feet/legs and boots.

post #10 of 24
Whatever boot you can get in red. they are the fastest.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

^^^^  This is pointless.  Height/weight/skill will get you close to what you need in terms of flex.  But every boot manufacturer makes different-flex boots.  The single most important element of boots is how they fit and work with your anatomy.  Period.  No issues of design, buckles, color trump having boots that fit like the proverbial glove. Manufacturers and sales-folk may tell you that certain boots are "best"; if they tell you that....RUN!  There is only one major criteria for "best": and that's the one already enunciated by mfa81.  

 

Only after you have skied for a long time on several pairs of boots that fit really, really well might you (maybe) decide that one feature or element of one boot distinguishes it enough to warrant buying that one.  

And the idea of matching boots to skis.....ridiculous.  

Truer words than this are rarely spoken here.  Any boot that fits your feet properly and is of a proper flex for you will work just fine.  There is likely to be a good boot fitter in Steamboat.  Just wait until you get there to buy boots, unless there's a good one near where you live.

post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 

to the few who gave useful answers, thanks. 

 

is there a 21+ area to discuss opinions on equipment, or are condescending answers the norm?  i participate in other forums, some as an expert, and never give newbs answers that try to make them feel bad for asking a basic q.  on this site, i see it alot,  of course, if i had 8k posts on any forum, i'd review how i spent my free time in general. 

 

thanks, kids.

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post

to the few who gave useful answers, thanks. 

is there a 21+ area to discuss opinions on equipment, or are condescending answers the norm?  i participate in other forums, some as an expert, and never give newbs answers that try to make them feel bad for asking a basic q.  on this site, i see it alot,  of course, if i had 8k posts on any forum, i'd review how i spent my free time in general. 

thanks, kids.

You're a big guy. I'd suggest something with at least a 130 flex. Without seeing your foot, there's nothing more to suggest. Let us about your foot. Better yet, post some photos.... of your bare foot and lower leg.
post #14 of 24

berbes: Between 100 and 130 flex, big guy or not your not racing you want a responsive boot and one that is comfortable. Most boots are comfortable but even racers I know usually have 2 sets of boots if they are racing because they find wearing there racing boots all day long can be a tiring.  I have 2 pairs right now and plan on picking up a stiffer boot for coaching and some racing purposes but I usually have a 100-120. I do have a pair that go from 70-90 and do have a switch on them, but at 70 its like my legs are swimming all over the place, only found them useful at this setting when skiing all day in powder. Here are a couple of guides that might be useful, remember most of the people in here are sarcastic, you will get use to it! lol 

 

http://www.evo.com/how-to-choose-ski-boots-size-and-fit-guide.aspx#Flex

 

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-101/boot-fitting-101/boot-fitting-101

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BK0h_4VJdoA

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez3V61rnu2g

 

This one helps with different adjustment in the boot and what types are out there, I have an adjustable one if you can find them, as now my right knee doesn't hold up as well as it once did. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaoWK2jyduE

 

and this, so I think you have more then enough info to make a good decision besides some of the good answers on here. 

 

http://www.skinet.com/ski/gear/boots/2009/07/boot-flex-ratings       older info but still holds pretty close, I skied in a pair of 140 flex and my feet and back and knees were killing me at the end of the day. So I stick between 100-120.

 

 

I  had a custom job many years ago, so now I know what to look for, since I have a narrow foot and heal and Nordica seem to fit me well with zero adjustments needed now. But what helped was a custom job many years ago, I should go through one again as I am sure my arch has fallen over the years.  Remember a lot of so so shops will push you into a softer ski boot because a lot of times they don't carry anything stiffer than a 100-110, well in the local shops I been into. 


Edited by QuickTurner - 3/3/14 at 11:59am
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post
 

to the few who gave useful answers, thanks. 

 

is there a 21+ area to discuss opinions on equipment, or are condescending answers the norm?  i participate in other forums, some as an expert, and never give newbs answers that try to make them feel bad for asking a basic q.  on this site, i see it alot,  of course, if i had 8k posts on any forum, i'd review how i spent my free time in general

 

thanks, kids.

Hmmmm.... condescending.... hmmmmm.........

 

Nope, don't see any condescending here.

post #16 of 24

Truthful yes, condescending no.  The flex of a boot and the claimed ability level for a ski don't relate, unless you're talking race room skis, which you are not.  The skis I use, Atomic ST11, Nordica Steadfast and Atomic Ritual are all considered advanced to expert skis, but my boot is only a 90 flex.  I'm about 5'8", 150 pounds and my boot set for that flex works very well for me, in any terrain.  There is no matching boots to skis, only matching boots to my feet and setting bindings to match the BSL.

post #17 of 24

Berbes, I agree you got some disrespectful responses to your first post ever on Epic.  These guys should

know better.

 

Here's the deal about boots.  You need a boot with a plastic shell that has a three dimensional shape that matches the

shape of your foot as close as possible.  The reason for this is that your foot needs to move in all kinds of directions,

and it needs to be in firm contact with the boot surface so the boot moves as your foot moves.  The boot then

moves the ski.  

 

If you have air inside the boot because its shell doesn't match the surface shape of your foot, or because you

buy a boot too big and comfy, then some of your foot's movements won't result in immediate movement of the

boot, and immediate movement of the ski.  You will lose ski performance and ski control.  Your feet are

your controllers for your skis; you don't want any lag time between when you do something with your feet

and when the skis respond.  Thus the "fit" of the boot is the only thing that matters.  

 

The fact that boot manufacturers talk about the good qualities of their boots is irrelevant; they are trying to sell boots

and they do succeed in marketing them that way.  Most people are in the wrong boots because they pay attention to

marketing or color or comfort in the store instead of paying attention to real fit as explained by a real bootfitter (not a

bootseller).  Or they go to the internet and buy a "bargain."

 

You can think about boot flex if you like, but it's mostly pointless.  You may find two boots that fit your foot exactly

the same, but I doubt it; one is almost always better in fit than another.  But if you find two that fit exactly the same,

then flex can make the decision.  In that case the question becomes do you need a soft beginner boot, or a firm

expert or race boot, or something in between.  That's easy to answer.  

 

Someone said you are a big guy.  If that's true, and you are not a petite woman, then go with the firmer of the two

that fit exactly the same.  Your bootfitter can always soften it up.  No bootfitter can firm up a noodly boot.

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

You're a big guy. I'd suggest something with at least a 130 flex. Without seeing your foot, there's nothing more to suggest. Let us about your foot. Better yet, post some photos.... of your bare foot and lower leg.

Should qualify this... 240 lbs and an expert skier. OP, there's just really no way to give you the answer you're looking for without seeing your foot, seeing it in a shell, then assembling the boot to get an idea of how you might flex it.
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Just go with the red ones...


Unless it is a red car...

 

By the way, what kind of bindings you mounting on that ski?

post #20 of 24
They come w/ bindings. Rocker optional.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Berbes, I agree you got some disrespectful responses to your first post ever on Epic.  These guys should

know better.

Incorrect.  OP started posting in 2009.

post #22 of 24

berbes: I happen to take out a pair of Rossi 82 ti tonight as local friend who works for he ski patrol had a pair of 182cm strapped to his feet on the chair, not bad they were speed demons and handled the hard packed and ice like a champ, I might be looking for a pair on clearance during spring or summer. ;)  But after looking at Mowmow picture I am not too sure! ;) 

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Berbes, I agree you got some disrespectful responses to your first post ever on Epic.  These guys should

know better.

Incorrect.  OP started posting in 2009.

 

Whoops.  I thought I saw #1 on his post.  Looked in the wrong place.

post #24 of 24
berbe, no one was sharp with you until you dismissed responses as though the posters were stupid, told them to just go away and stop bothering you, and basically acted like a second grade school teacher correcting a student. Condescending much?

The simple fact is that boots don't go with skis; they go with feet and body mechanics and geometry and skiing style. Maybe I missed the memo, but there's no need to ski a soft intermediate ski with a soft light boot. I've skied soft skis in my stiff boots with no ill effect, and soft light boots on soft skis with terrible consequences because the boots were too soft and the wrong shape for my foot.

But maybe you're really looking for suggestions for boots that are light, soft, and comfy for a low intermediate skier. Is that it? I'm not sure that could be answered directly, but at least it would remove the reactions to the idea that you're buying boots for your skis instead of for you.
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