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Skis losing wax way too soon

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Usually I wax after two or three days of skiing, but today, after only one day of skiing, my bases have already turned significantly white. I skied 33km/20 miles on loose granular snow.  The wax I use is Swix CH 8, and today's temperature started around 10F and slowly went up to 30F.

 

Here's how I wax my skis:

-brush a few times with copper and horsehair to clean and open the structure (but I often forget this step:mad)

-crayon some wax on to the entire length (tapping it on the iron to help)

-work the wax in with the iron. I passed through the middle of the ski, then the sides. I do this two maybe three times.

-let the ski cooldown for an hour (although last time was only 30 minutes)

-warm up the wax again

-use fiberlene paper to remove extra wax, once again down the middle and the sides. I do this twice, with a fresh piece of fiberlene in between.

-done! Excess wax is removed and a couple runs.

 

The reason I do it this way is to avoid the mess of scraping and brushing. I live in an apartment, so I don't have anywhere to make a big mess. I know doing it this way doesn't make them as fast at first, but I'm not racing, so I don't care about that.

 

The step of letting the ski cooldown is something I added recently, with the assumption that it will absorb better. I used to soak up the extra wax right after working it into the ski.

 

I probably should be using a harder wax, but when I bought it, I wasn't expecting to have this wonderfully cold winter. Is there anyway doing multiple waxings would be possible using my fiberlene method?

post #2 of 10
Scratch the white part with your fingernail and see if it goes away. If it does it could be just unremoved wax.
post #3 of 10
Just excess wax coming off is my guess.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

It does get scratched off with my nail. I thought even when that happened that it's time to wax. You guys are saying there's still plenty in there and there's no need to wax?

post #5 of 10
Right. Brush better next time.
post #6 of 10
Yeah, personally I just leave it that way, since I'm not after that extra few seconds it's not really worth the extra effort to brush all the wax out.
post #7 of 10

Also, I think 8 is a little soft for your conditions.  Don't be afraid to use a colder range wax.  Remember, it's better to have your wax be one temp range to the cold side than it is to have it only slightly to the warm or soft side.  If you don't want to play the Swix number game, Dominator wax makes a VERY good universal wax in their Zoom series of waxes that would be a really good option for you.  Either Zoom or Zoom w/graphite, both would serve you well.

 

Are you not scraping and just skiing the wax off? 

post #8 of 10

I know quite a few people do the no scraping or brushing after waxing, I've just always thought leaving excess wax on the skis, more importantly down in the structure, gives all the crap, crud, pollutants, etc. etc. something to stick to.  Just one guys take on it.

post #9 of 10
redface.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post

I know quite a few people do the no scraping or brushing after waxing, I've just always thought leaving excess wax on the skis, more importantly down in the structure, gives all the crap, crud, pollutants, etc. etc. something to stick to.  Just one guys take on it.

Mostly depends on your condition. I used to not scrape for the icy groomers, since the ice does a better job than I can, never noticed any dirt issue. But they are like glue on fresh snow, so now I scrape but only brush lightly.

Although if I skied somewhere with powder everyday I'd pay more attention to brushing.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 

I know quite a few people do the no scraping or brushing after waxing, I've just always thought leaving excess wax on the skis, more importantly down in the structure, gives all the crap, crud, pollutants, etc. etc. something to stick to.  Just one guys take on it.


Yes. Brush the hell out of them.  Don't ever skip that step.  Even if you don't wax that night brush them out good with brass or very fine steel.
Other thing is snow temps. do not change as much as air temps. 

I like the fiberlene to remove a good part of the wax.  That's good for some cleaning as well.  If you can just do the brushing outside.  Let the ski cool overnight is best.

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