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Want to be able to ski icy groomers, need carving ski, help? - Page 3

post #61 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 

 

 

Which?  

 

 

Any. Dynastars in general are great for plowing through crud and ice. I love the Cham 127s, but they're really big hard charging skis that would be way too much ski for most people. (189cm and 127mm underfoot) Just go to the Dynastar website and look at the type of skis you want. All mountain twins? Try the Slicer. Off-piste oriented hard chargers? Try the Cham 107 or Cham 107 HM.

post #62 of 67

Rossignol 88, or Blizzard Brahma's and the Rossignol Avenger 82's all great skis, skiing through all types of snow. Dynastars as well, just not sure what model as I have a older pair of Ski Cross 10s that are not bad either. Depends on the Mountain/Hill conditions etc..  Frankly I love my Rossignol FIS Slant Nose for any icy conditions as it carves through anything icy, I was shocked on how good the edge grip was. Dynastar Chams are also nice. 

post #63 of 67

Coming in late to this discussion without reading through previous postings so sorry if I repeat what others said. In general could be said that for "carving" you need carving skis and for icy conditions you need "sharp edges". Want to carve in icy conditions get a pair of well tuned carving skis. The turn radius will determine how fast you go but remember that the longer the skis are the better is the edge hold. The longer the skis are the wider is the turn radius. The wider the turn radius the faster they go. The edge hold on my SG skis are what dreams are made of. But they are way too fast for regular crowded slopes. My favorite carving ski is a 165cm FIS SL ski. You can go really fast and you can carve tight enough turns for skiing down a European black if its well groomed.

 

If you don't want to get SL racing skis any high end well tuned all mountain skis with a turn radius of about 12-16m that are not too wide will do. Tip rocker will help. Note that rental skis are never tuned well enough and racers put down hours and hours on tuning their skis. I basicly tune my skis every time Ive been skiing. And if I ski on ice I need to sharpen the edges after a few runs. Inspecting an icy course is enough to dull the edges.

post #64 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stebed View Post
 

I suck on icy groomers, some people make it look so easy. I see people on icy slopes and you’d think they were skiing fresh corduroy. How much of it is technique? How much of it is the ski? And how much of it is the tuning?

 

I'm a west coast skier at heart, always skied soft snow, bowls, chutes, etc.. that is where I am at my best. Icy groomers are where I am at my absolute worst, and have always avoided them. But i've been out east for about 5 years now and have been playing on S3's the whole time. Spend almost all my time in glades or on bumps and they've been fun, really playful, etc.. and fun on groomers when the snow is soft, can carve and hold an edge. But when it gets really firm or icy, forget it. It's skid city. It probably doesn't help that my edges haven’t been tuned in ages, they’ve been so chewed up by rocks there’s no point. And I doubt it’s an ideal ski for those kinds of conditions. So I’ve got a lot working against me :)

 

So now that my kids are getting old enough to ski and I’ll be spending a lot of time on groomers, and more than likely not always nice soft groomers, I want to get some new skis. I’m 6’ 190lbs. I’ll always have my S3’s for powder days or post powder days when everything is still soft, so I’m not looking for a jack of all trades type ski. I want a ski that is going to make skiing icy groomers fun. My technique is decent but I’m definitely no level 4 CSIA. But the first step is getting the right kind of ski. If that doesn't cut it then I know I have some work to do technique wise.

 

I know lots about powder skis and -nothing- about carving skis. What should I get or try to demo? 

IMO without reading all the other post, technique. First off, how do your boots fit, have they been fitted by a good boot fitter do you have custom foot beds if needed ?

 

My volkl Kendo's hold great on the ice at Okemo, even my 119mm Shiro's are not that bad in the frozen mornings this time of year 5'll be out on them in about a hour its 31F here in town now . I tune my own skis. I see no need for a narrow ski for the few day's I might use one.

post #65 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sh4d0w View Post
 

 

 

Any. Dynastars in general are great for plowing through crud and ice. I love the Cham 127s, but they're really big hard charging skis that would be way too much ski for most people. (189cm and 127mm underfoot) Just go to the Dynastar website and look at the type of skis you want. All mountain twins? Try the Slicer. Off-piste oriented hard chargers? Try the Cham 107 or Cham 107 HM.

 

I would have said one of the Chromes or a Contact.

post #66 of 67
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post #67 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post

 

I would have said one of the Chromes or a Contact.

 



I was just giving examples, if OP wants a more directional carving on-piste ski then yeah those would be better than the ones I mentioned. I just don't have any experience with those because I have very little interest in skis designed solely for on-piste.
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