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What to expect in Whistler ?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Dear Epic Friends,

 

Will be our first time at Whistler, next March, 10.

 

Clues are welcomed!

 

Can't waittttttttttttttttttt :rotflmao:

 

Regards,

Edu

post #2 of 26

Lots of threads on Whistler. Do a search and ask some specific questions as they pertain to your particular trip in one of those threads. The way you've started is just an announcement of your trip. So great, I sincerely hope you have great snow and a wonderful time.


Edited by DaveB - 2/26/14 at 1:06pm
post #3 of 26
You should expect to look and see a couple of very big hills. smile.gif
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 

Ops!!!!!!!!

 

I would say: What to expect about the weather and the snow conditions

 

:o

post #5 of 26

There will be snow to ski on but not sure if it will be new snow or old snow...

post #6 of 26

Here is my first time trip report post from the amazing last weekend:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/126282/whistler-blackcomb-feb-21-23

 

and someone also tacked on a post or two to the other trip report

http://www.epicski.com/t/125506/wb-1-4-feb

 

otherwise readthrough the reviews/guides for general background

 

http://www.epicski.com/products/whistler-blackcomb

post #7 of 26

You have a good chance of OK to good skiing weather and good snow, but nothing is ever guaranteed.  March is a good month in Whistler on average.  Since you've committed to the trip, just go, expect a good time, and don't loose sleep over things you can't influence.

post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 

Ok!

 

The village is great. Breath taking are the views up there, as it is inside the p2p gondola.

 

They've terrain for everyone, ease, medium, hard, bumps, whatever you want. Unfortunately snow was not so good, at least on the lower half of the mountain. Ice mornings and slush afternoon. Ok, March :)

 

On the final, I skied just two days. Because, at the end of the 2nd day I was hit by a faaaaaast snowborder, I was looking for my way, stoped on a "family zone" area, just in front of a "slow down" banner.  The guy hit me like a bowling pin and he only stopped 10m down.

 

My leg was hurts a lot and became my major concern. The boot keep my leg on one piece, for sure. People help me and few minutes later, with less pain, I put the skis and be able to ski down to the hotel.


But after, with the body relaxed a strong pain on the spine and ribs not allow me to bend or flex. So, my season ends.

 

I'm not to much angry about that just because I really had skied a lot on this two days.

But People must to think about it deeper, before doesn't follow the rules and doesn't respect family zones and slow speed areas.

On my case, I've missed two days of my ski trip(a long planed one!), with my son and a lot of $$$.  Also, several days of pain due a two fissured ribs and  a severe injury on the shoulder ligaments. 

post #9 of 26

Did ski patrol catch up with the snowboarder? Hitting you like that, in front of a slow sign in a family zone, seems like something that should get him kicked off the mountain. What a bummer for you. 

post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 

Christy,

 

NO! No ski patrol at those point of the mountain that time.

Worse, I did realized that all the ways down after about 3pm were full of crazy speed skiers and boarders, even in family zones.

That said and, since I was a little tired that time, I became very cautious on look up constantly to avoid troubles and, also on where to stop to breath and check the path. So, in front of a slow sign looks to me a good place.  
To be honest, I didn't see ski patrol on my way down that afternoon.
And, for this reason, I already wrote a letter for the Whistler's administration

post #11 of 26

That sucks.  I just got back from WB, and those slow zones (particularly from Olympic chair down to the bottom on Whistler) are horrific.  The snow is crusty ice transitioning into slush, and the skiers/boarders are a mix of beginners, kids, people trying to get down from the top, and people who have no business going as fast as they are.  I stopped and chatted with one of the yellow-jacketed safety patrollers, who busted three or four people who bombed through the area (she was calling down on a radio to someone lower who was stopping them).  

 

I'm surprised to hear that there weren't yellow-jackets in that area, but maybe (since I was a few days after you) your incident caused them to staff up when I was there.  They were all over the place when I was there, and they even slowed down instructors coming down.

 

Sorry to hear about your incident, and hope the recovery is quick.

post #12 of 26
Quote:
 from Olympic chair down to the bottom on Whistler) are horrific.  The snow is crusty ice transitioning into slush, and the skiers/boarders are a mix of beginners, kids, people trying to get down from the top, and people who have no business going as fast as they are.  

 

And that is why I so often download on the gondola. Terrible snow+terrible skiers (and just way too many skiers funneled toward the bottom), who needs it. 

 

edlam could have been in the Emerald family zone, though. 

post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 

Yes, I do agree with you, download on the gondola should be a good idea.

But you know, when you have just four days of ski you'll try to enjoy all the time you can to!!

 

I was down from the top of 7 Haven to P2P to Cruiser and left then just to get on Green Line at the top of Excalibur, in order to slow down and enjoy the last minutes of the day...

 

Rob, thanks! I'm feeling better now. The major issue right now is that I can only sleep on one position. :rotflmao:

 

Eduardo

post #14 of 26

I download on the Gondola - at the beginning of the season, middle of the season and end of the season. It doesn't matter whether you are skiing 1 day, 4 days or 10 days. 

90% of injuries happen in a) the lower third of the mountain and b) between 2-4pm. Anecdotaly - so many people I have spoken to  who got injured on the mountain - their stories

are so similar - "It was about 330pm. I was having a great day on the mountain. I wanted to do this one run - one last time and boom !!!!'  The legs are tired. They are not making the

turns that they should be making. Some people are running late to pick up their kids from ski school etc. So they are straight-lining. And the ski school kids. they are all funneling down

to return by 330pm. Its like a human slalom. 

 

Not worth it. 

post #15 of 26

Reading your story, and just as as tip from the armchair, I think the better place is to stop behind the banner not in front of it.  

Your idea of being in front might have actually been the diagonal line the guy was intending to take. 

I've seen so many people stop in front of slow signs and get pissed when people start zooming around them, but when from different angles they're actually blocking certain funnelled paths.  I've gone out of my way to a few folks that were flipping the bird back after being buzzed to explain to them why people were zooming past them; instead of just the "get out of the way you're in the wrong spot" and buzzing past them myself.

 

 

There are also issues with target fixation where stopping in front causes you to become more of a target rather then protecting you.

 

Plus, from a self preservation standpoint, wouldn't you want the obstacle protecting you from the oncoming traffic, rather then you protecting the banner from the traffic?

Do you stop in front of a tree hoping somehow that causes the tree to save you? Or should you stop behind the tree.

 

In ski school even with 5year old kids they teach you when stopping, to line up and stop underneath the instructor; not to stack on top, then they all peel away in a nice cascade when the instructor is ready to lead them onto the next pitch.

 

Anyway hope you get better soon, and back on the slopes soon

post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 

"...There are also issues with target fixation where stopping in front causes you to become more of a target rather then protecting you..."

 

Can't agree more Raytseng! A foolish mistake.

 

Marty, for us who live on place where there are no snow, some behavior and costumes are hard to learn and understand. Mainly when you have so few days to enjoy it. But EpicSki is a great source of information and surely helps me in this manner. From now, end of the days = download on the gondola.

 

BTW, WB administration answered my letter and done it in a positive and kind way. 

 

Regards~

Eduardo

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by edlam View Post
 

"...There are also issues with target fixation where stopping in front causes you to become more of a target rather then protecting you..."

 

Can't agree more Raytseng! A foolish mistake.

 

Marty, for us who live on place where there are no snow, some behavior and costumes are hard to learn and understand. Mainly when you have so few days to enjoy it. But EpicSki is a great source of information and surely helps me in this manner. From now, end of the days = download on the gondola.

 

BTW, WB administration answered my letter and done it in a positive and kind way. 

 

Regards~

Eduardo

 

I assume you mean "customs" here.  But, I am reminded of the guy I saw last week at WB, standing just below a roller (so you could only see his upper body), wearing a white jacket, white backpack, and white helmet!  So his "costume" was also a problem!

 

And I am with you: I should learn to download on the gondola.  My least favourite run of every day is the one down to the village.

 

Glad to hear WB administration was on the ball.

post #18 of 26
Quote:
 

 

I've seen so many people stop in front of slow signs and get pissed when people start zooming around them, but when from different angles they're actually blocking certain funnelled paths.  I've gone out of my way to a few folks that were flipping the bird back after being buzzed to explain to them why people were zooming past them; instead of just the "get out of the way you're in the wrong spot" and buzzing past them myself.

No one should be "zooming" or "buzzing" anyone when in a slow zone inside a family zone, and a single skier isn't going to be "blocking" anything in these areas. As self preservation on your part, you'd need to expect that skiers in a slow family zone are going to be erratic, slow, or stand or sit in unexpected places. 

post #19 of 26
So since nobody should be doing it, it never happens? How do you explain that eduardo got hit then? Just like since pedestrians always have the right of way nobody ever will hit a jaywalker. So go ahead and just stroll into the streets, and especially in school zones, since those signs will protect you.

The last 4 posts that just observed the opposite.

My tip is still good and corresponds to the skiers code to stop in a safe place. The code is not mutually exclusive rules (if you want to disagree and debate the borders of the rules and which trumps which rule, you can read the 1000post threads and whether red or grey was right or wrong). But to me the rules overlap and have a principle to err on the side of caution.

You got to make some defensive decisions to save yourself. don't just put your safety entirely in the hands of other people or a flimsy banner.

Yes you may end up being right, but you may also end up being in the hospital

As for what I did in the above story, I went the extra mile to completely stop and explain in a normal voice to the furious stopped boarder why he was getting buzzed (and it's not just because everyone else is an asshole), and what he could do to avoid being in that situation and just getting furious-er; so I will smugly claim the moral highground in my story.
I'm also sure the people "buzzing" him probably were under the impression they were giving him plenty of space and going well within their control.

For sure I've been wrong in other situations but I'll be the first to apologize and admit mistakes when pointed out to me
Edited by raytseng - 3/26/14 at 10:44am
post #20 of 26

I prefer to stop behind immovable objects, and I mean RIGHT behind them. It is not what I have to do in my rights but something that I should do to protect myself.

post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 

"I assume you mean "customs" here...."  Ops!  No Rob, my mistake I use the word in Portugues, where costume means habit.

 

Ok, I agree that I've stopped in front of the banner and it was not the best choice. But, for sure, I was not stopped into the way, indeed.

 

And, talking about rules: if the guy who hit me had followed the rules, he could easily maneuver to avoid the collision. If we have special rules on "family zones" and "slow speed" areas, as we have ea:. limited speed in front of schools,  it means that it's necessary in order to avoid accidents, since children would cross the street suddenly.

post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 

Hello!

Some times bad things happens in order of  good ones can too.

That said, the contacts with WB management were surprisingly professional, respectfull and kind.

At last, they offered to reimburse my missed day at the mountain.

So, this is the kind of behavior that we love to see on an organization. Congratulations WB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:beercheer:

post #23 of 26
I think that if you are stopped in front of a ten foot wide banner and you're only three feet above it and you've been standing there a bit, you should be safe. If we're talking a one foot wide banner, then you could be blocking the word SLOW, but I would also expect that, in front or behind is equally useless. If we're taking twenty feet above a ten foot wide banner then not a good place to stop.
post #24 of 26

Even though Upper/Lower Olympic is a slow skiing zone, it's probably the absolute most dangerous route on the mountain. I ski down the greens as quickly as possible to avoid getting clobbered by one of the unskilled hordes. 

 

A much safer green route to get down to the midstation is Pony Trail > Bear Cub > Expressway.  

post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 

Sibhusk;  10 foot long banner, few inches in front.

Metaphor; I think I've discovered it on the worst way.

But, "..Upper/Lower Olympic is a slow skiing zone, it's probably the absolute most dangerous route on the mountain... At least to me it doesn't make any sense. I agree, in fact it probably works this way, but seems paradoxical since people speed up  on slow zone? Like I've said, it's difficult to feel and understand the mainstream behavior if you came from abroad.  But I'm learning a lot and, for sure, next time at the mountain I'll be able to avoid these kind of problems. ;)

post #26 of 26
Basically, the guy would have hit the banner anyway. You just happened to be there, too.
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