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What do you ACTUALLY do when your goggles fog up while skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 41

I grew up in Bozeman, and spent all my time away from school at Bridger Bowl.  Standard procedure during a big powder day, or after a launch off of an unanticipated whatever was to move the goggle down a bit on the bridge of the nose while skiing down to the lift to allow more air to flow in.  Then, while riding the chair up, put the goggle inside your coat to allow the body heat to warm the goggle up enough to even the surface temps of the lenses thus eliminating the fog.  We didn't have high speed lifts, so the time on the chair was generally sufficient.  I hope this helps!  Another tactic that works is to dry rub some Ivory bar soap on the inside of the lens, then using a micro fiber clothe, polish the soap until clear.  This adds a micro layer that will absorb moisture.  It is basically a poor man's nog fog cloth.

Bob

post #32 of 41

Meh,

My goggles don't get foggy while skiing. In the PNW.

post #33 of 41
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the cool replies!  Was very informative. Tho, no magic bullets for 'what to actually do while out there when it happens'. Also enjoyed the humor.  Will have to try the tantrum! Interesting to me that some folks say "hasn't happened in 20 years" as for me, it is intermittent..but over many years, never really lets up.  Not that different the year that the goggles are new, so I don't think its scratches on the surface. Of course on sunny days fine, but in the northwest that is not very common. But, i'm going to look again at the fit, tighten some more.  I also just ordered the Swipeeze mentioned above.  I have the Smith I/O, and I think i'll order an extra lens to carry...of the same tint, not a different tint.  The lens for the darker days (which i use most often), will then have two of them, so can swap (without changing tint) fairly quickly if bad fogging happens. Keep truckin and skiing!  Tom

post #34 of 41

One other thought: are you too warm?  The the increased humidity from perspiration and the warm rising air off your body is what I've found causes google fogging.  Maybe try wearing one less layer?

 

While skiing I'm constantly regulating my temperature so that I don't get too warm and sweaty while skiing, or too cold riding the lift.   I always wear a jacket with at hood and pit zips, and an insulating layer with a zip neck.  At the first sign of overheating I'm ventilating, that way my goggles never fog.

post #35 of 41

I'll add that when I buy googles, I bring my helmet to make sure everything seals up nicely.

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

One other thought: are you too warm?  The the increased humidity from perspiration and the warm rising air off your body is what I've found causes google fogging.  Maybe try wearing one less layer?

 

While skiing I'm constantly regulating my temperature so that I don't get too warm and sweaty while skiing, or too cold riding the lift.   I always wear a jacket with at hood and pit zips, and an insulating layer with a zip neck.  At the first sign of overheating I'm ventilating, that way my goggles never fog.

 

This is the best REAL advice in the thread. Most people dress too warm. I go by the metric that if I am actually WARM standing in line or on the lift, then I'm not dressed properly. At the end of the day I can deal with being a little cool. But fogged up goggles can ruin an otherwise great day.

post #37 of 41

One other thing about overheating--I can't wear the ear muffs that come with a helmet except on the coldest days (I'm in California). I take off the ear pieces and wear a thin helmet liner that covers my ears and that I can easily take off when it's warm enough. It helps that the helmet headband adjusts easily with a dial (Smith).

 

http://www.bulabula.com/product/shelter-micro-helmet-liner/

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post

I haven't had a foggy goggle in 20 years so I have no input.

For me it would be about 18 years. But i do have one input... I never ever EVER touch the inner part of my goggles from the day I open the box.
post #39 of 41
OP, I hear you. Awful lot of true-believer "never"s in this thread, for a world that's full of exceptions, and full of differences in anatomy, face shape, perspiration, local climate, etc., etc.

Much good info buried amid the excess certainty, especially the stuff about not removing the goggles once outside. The neck gaiter / face mask quandary is a stumper for those of us who live where it is very cold, very windy, and very damp at once. My tactic is to pull it all down below my mouth when skiing hard (bumps, trees, gates), and pull it back up when cruising or on the lift. When up, it's key to exhale out / down through exposed nostrils, not covered mouth where breath might be redirected upwards.

Sometimes you just gotta go into the lodge, blot with clean dry cloth, then wave around and wait for real drying and warming to occur while trying to figure out how not to repeat mistake.
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

OP, I hear you. Awful lot of true-believer "never"s in this thread, for a world that's full of exceptions, and full of differences in anatomy, face shape, perspiration, local climate, etc., etc.

Much good info buried amid the excess certainty, especially the stuff about not removing the goggles once outside. The neck gaiter / face mask quandary is a stumper for those of us who live where it is very cold, very windy, and very damp at once. My tactic is to pull it all down below my mouth when skiing hard (bumps, trees, gates), and pull it back up when cruising or on the lift. When up, it's key to exhale out / down through exposed nostrils, not covered mouth where breath might be redirected upwards.

Sometimes you just gotta go into the lodge, blot with clean dry cloth, then wave around and wait for real drying and warming to occur while trying to figure out how not to repeat mistake.

All of this ^^^^, including the pull-down, pull-up deal with the gator, training to nose breathe, and not taking it off outside (sure death). But on truly bad days, I shift to something like this: http://www.seirus.com/snow-sports-detail/1380/?ltag=snow-sports-ByTag/face-protection/ although the one I have doesn't use the roll-stitching around the forehead and face, which can create irritation. The nose design and holes over the mouth permit fairly normal breathing without much fogging. 

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Much good info buried amid the excess certainty, especially the stuff about not removing the goggles once outside. The neck gaiter / face mask quandary is a stumper for those of us who live where it is very cold, very windy, and very damp at once. My tactic is to pull it all down below my mouth when skiing hard (bumps, trees, gates), and pull it back up when cruising or on the lift. When up, it's key to exhale out / down through exposed nostrils, not covered mouth where breath might be redirected upwards.
 

 

my face mask has a mouth hole. gotta watch out for chapped lips, but it helps avoid the hot air into goggles problem.

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