or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Getting the edge?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

How do you get the edge of the ski into the snow for turns?  Just read the post on carving and steering.   Should the boot be flexible?  Mine are very stiff.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 9

Stand in the kitchen in your boots.  Tip both boots to the left, so you are standing on the left edges of your boots with air under the right sides.

If the boots were clicked into the bindings, the skis would be edged, with the left sides pressed into the snow and air under the right sides.

 

You can tip the boots by tipping your ankles sideways.

You can tip the boots by sticking your hip out to the side.

You can combine these.
There's more to this; I hope this simple explanation helps get the idea across.


Was this what you were asking about?

post #3 of 9

Tilting is how you get a ski on edge.  I suggest practicing by putting on your boots only and tilting your feet in front of a mirror.  You should be standing with your knees fairly bent and your feet less than shoulder width apart.  If you can't tilt your feet, your legs may be too fare apart.   

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you!!  I will practice in the safety of my own home. :rotflmao: Maybe it will be easier to do on the slopes if I have it engrained first.

post #5 of 9

There is a ski training aid that can help you feel the motions needed to control skis.  It's called the SkiA Sweetspot.  I started using the Sweetspot while after recovering from a knee injury.  It's proved to be very helpful to improve my skiing in general.

 

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks!  Gosh, being on this forum has helped me considerably!  Everyone is so encouraging.   I have never heard of the SkiA sweetspot.   thanks for the idea and the video.  I will definitely get it.

 

thanks again!!!

post #7 of 9

The tipping sensation  with the SkiA's  on flat surface is a bit different than on a downhill surface.  Seems like  a  different sweet spot balance point like a actual ski hill.   I suggest trying it on a ramp inside with boots on and on a hill outdoors with the ski boots & skis on.  

 

I noticed more of a forefoot pressure and other leg functions  on a downhill like sloped  surface just like skiing.  Really works the tipping and balancing movements.  It is handy to use ski poles for balance in the beginning.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by carvequest View Post
 

The tipping sensation  with the SkiA's  on flat surface is a bit different than on a downhill surface.  Seems like  a  different sweet spot balance point like a actual ski hill.   I suggest trying it on a ramp inside with boots on and on a hill outdoors with the ski boots & skis on.  

 

I noticed more of a forefoot pressure and other leg functions  on a downhill like sloped  surface just like skiing.  Really works the tipping and balancing movements.  It is handy to use ski poles for balance in the beginning.

I think for a beginner, better to start on a flat surface.  One of the goals is to build confidence.  That's easier to do when keeping the exercise as simple as possible initially.  That can mean sticking with the green blocks for quite a while before moving to the next size (blue).  Just as it's better to master turning and stopping skills on green slopes before moving to blues.

post #9 of 9

The thing you cannot do is abruptly get on edge.  Nor get on an edge late in the turn.  You'll skid.

 

You need to roll your ankles on to the edge smoothly and very early in the turn.  You finish one turn by rolling to the new edge for the next turn and simultaneously pull both feet behind to to engage the ski tips in the snow.  Start on an easy slope where you won't get going too fast.  You can work on edging and riding the edges around the turn without being concerned about speed.  You want to be able to balance on the inside edge of the outside ski in each turn with very little weight (10% or less) on the inside ski.  Your feet need to be walking-width apart.  With your boots on at home on a hard floor, try edging with your feet wide apart, then close together.  Wide apart works very poorly.

 

Stiff boots are better.  They give you something to work against when you need to re-center.  Stiff boots transfer your movements to the skis much more quickly.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Beginner Zone